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Transfer Student Issues Calendar

Transferring to a new school has very unique issues associated with it. Sometimes, fitting in is a problem for transfer students because they are coming in a year or two later than their other classmates. Encourage your student to seek out organizations and activities that interest them. The Rosenberg Center for Student Involvement (CSI) has many ways for students to be engaged and involved while at the University of Baltimore, regardless of their year. For more issues and tips to look for concerning transfer students, click here .

  • August

    Issue: Transitioning to a new institution.
    Solution: Students should attend orientation to get acclimated to the campus and learn about the resources that are available. Students should also attend the Transfer Information sessions and Transfer Advisement and Registration sessions to gain more information and meet new people.

    Issue: Uncertain about major.
    Solution: Encourage your student to speak with an academic advisor or visit the Career and Professional Development Center to start career exploration.

    Issue: Unfamiliar with the community surrounding the school.
    Solution: Encourage your student to become familiar with the surrounding community and what it has to offer. Suggest that they ask some people about places to hang out, shop, eat, etc.

  • September

    Issue: Students are not sure how to get involved.
    Solution: Students should visit the Rosenberg Center for Student Involvement or go to their website at http://www.ubalt.edu/campus-life/csi/.

    Issue: Needing a job to off-set expenses.
    Solution: Students can access the UBworks website via the MyUB Portal for available work study and on-campus positions.

  • October

    Issue: Anxiety over mid-terms and projects due at the halfway point of the semester.
    Solution: Students may contact the Achievement and Learning Center for tutoring. Students are also encouraged to set up meetings with professors to discuss their success in the class.

    Issue: It’s time for students to plan their schedule for the Spring Semester and they are not sure what to take.
    Solution: Students should meet with their academic advisors.

  • November

    Issue: Stress is starting to accumulate because the semester is about to end and students are worried about grades for the end of the semester.
    Solution: Students can meet with their professors to talk about their progress in that professor’s class. Students should also start studying for finals early.

    Issue: Stress and being overwhelmed is starting to take your student on an emotional roller coaster.
    Solution: Recommend that your student take care of their emotional well-being by visiting the Counseling Center. Students should also check out the Mind and Body classes in the Wellness Center.

  • December

    Issue: Final exams/papers are overwhelming and students are having trouble finding time to get everything done.
    Solution: Encourage your student to write down all deadlines and exam dates; make a schedule for study time, exams, and everything else that needs to be done. Remind them to prioritize.


  • January

    Issue: Getting back into the groove of going to class, homework, studying, and co-curricular commitments.
    Solution: Suggest that your student create a new calendar with all the new dates and times of commitments, tests, and assignments for the semester.

    Issue: Considering study abroad.
    Solution: Students may begin their research of study abroad programs by visiting the Diversity and Culture Center. Remind your student to consider all requirements, especially financial requirements.

  • February

    Issue: Anxiety about funding for next school term.
    Solution: Students may look for information about scholarships/grants on the scholarship website.

    Issue: Anxiety about career interest/internship.
    Solution: Encourage your student to visit the Career and Professional Development Center to receive help with resume building and to find out about career/internship information.

  • March

    Issue: Spring Break is approaching and no plans have been made.
    Solution: Suggest that your student consider using their Spring Break to do something constructive. Check out information on alternative Spring Break options with the Helen P. Denit Honors Program, the Diversity and Culture Center and/or the Rosenberg Center for Student Involvement.

    Issue: Unsupervised Spring Break trip.
    Solution: Remind your student to be responsible. Students should discuss the logistics of trip with other attendees (finances, travel, etc.).

    Issue: Mid-terms are approaching and procrastination has increased due to Spring Break.
    Solution: Encourage your student to keep track of test dates. Students should visit the Achievement and Learning Center for tutoring services.

  • April

    Issue: Career/internship exploration.
    Solution: Students are encouraged to visit the Career and Professional Development Center to start working on a resume and exploring career and internship interests.

    Issue: Semester is coming to an end and students begin to lack of motivation.
    Solution: Encourage your student to stay focused. Recommend that your student make note of all exam dates and final assignments. Students should begin studying for final exams early. Students are also encouraged to meet with their professors to discuss their progress in classes.

  • May

    Issue: Unsure of summer plans.
    Solution: Students may consider taking summer classes or getting a job for the summer to save money for the next year.

    Issue: Anxiety and depression over leaving friends for the summer.
    Solution: Recommend that your student get contact information from friends to stay in touch over the summer.