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Yale Gordon College of Arts and Sciences

PSYC Course Descriptions

View the schedule of classes to determine course offerings by semester.

  • PSYC 100 Introduction to Psychology (3)

    This survey course is an introduction to the science of psychology, with an explicit focus on the understanding of human behavior and experience. Methods used by psychologists to investigate behavior and experience are introduced, and an overview of the major fields of psychology is provided, including discussion of each area's primary theories and models. [SOSC / QQT or GIK]

  • PSYC 200 Introduction to Professional Practices (3)

    Psychology majors learn the problems, methods, thinking styles, ethical standards and career opportunities of modern behavioral science and practice. Students participate in classroom discussion on topics of current concern in psychology, practice the writing style of the American Psychological Association and acquire effective methods for developing a professional resume. prerequisite: PSYC 100 and satisfaction of lower-division general-education requirement in composition or their equivalents

  • PSYC 205 Human Development (3)

    The psychological aspects of the human growth and development process from conception and birth through childhood, adolescence, adulthood and old age. Included are the physical, social and emotional influences on the course of development in role, identity and goal orientation. prerequisite: PSYC 100 or an equivalent introductory psychology course or permission of program director

  • PSYC 210 Interpersonal Psychology (3)

    An examination of intrapersonal and interpersonal dynamics at work within one's relationship with oneself as well as within relationships between the self and others. Application of course concepts facilitates students' own personal discovery processes, and techniques for increasing overall life satisfaction via interpersonal problem-solving are presented.

  • PSYC 215 Human Sexuality (3)

    Reviews the psychological literature on human sexuality, including behavioral patterns, life-cycle changes, interpersonal attraction and the scientific study of love. Sexual functioning throughout the lifespan is discussed, in addition to how it may be influenced by one's gender, age, sexual orientation, religion, culture and racial/ethnic background. Topics may include female and male anatomy, love and sexuality, intimacy, trust and sexual expression, date rape, the sexual response cycle, sexually transmitted diseases, and birth control and contraception.

  • PSYC 220 Stress Identification and Management (3)

    A study of the interaction between a human's environment and psycho-physiological systems involved in the generation of stress and development of related disease processes. The use of electronic instrumentation in the evaluation and amelioration of stress reactions and research are examined. Techniques and strategies of stress management are discussed. Laboratory fee required. prerequisite: PSYC 100 or an equivalent introductory psychology course or permission of the program director

  • PSYC 230 Behavior Modification in Applied Settings (3)

    Application of operant learning theory to problems in everyday life. Students design, conduct and report on their own, self-regulated behavior change programs based on principles of the "ABC" model of learning. Topics include how to identify, define and collect information on problem behaviors, how to select effective consequences for those behaviors, and how to maintain desirable behaviors in new settings. No prior psychology coursework is required.

  • PSYC 240 Educational Psychology (3)

    Applications of current psychological theories of learning, cognition and motivation within a variety of formal and informal educational settings. prerequisite: PSYC 100 or an equivalent introductory psychology course or permission of the program director

  • PSYC 250 Social Psychology (3)

    A consideration of the individual in social situations and of the social environment as a source of psychological stimulations and social conflicts. prerequisite: PSYC 100 or an equivalent introductory psychology course or permission of the program director

  • PSYC 260 Psychology of Religion and Spirituality (3)

    An in-depth, research-based survey of the study of the origins, development and consequences of religion and spirituality from a psychological perspective. The relationship between religion and social-psychological variables in particular is investigated. Religious experiences from a variety of perspectives, including the objective, Freudian, Jungian and humanistic, are examined. The relationship between science and religion is also addressed. prerequisite: PSYC 100 or an equivalent introductory psychology course or permission of the program director

  • PSYC 297 Topics in Psychology (3)

    Introductory exploration of issues, concepts and methods in psychology. Topics will vary according to interests of students and faculty; the subject studied appears under the Topics heading in the class schedule. Course may be repeated for credit when topic changes. prerequisite: PSYC 100 or an equivalent introductory psychology course or permission of the program director

  • PSYC 300 History and Systems in Psychology (3)

    The historical development of the major schools and systems of psychology. The philosophical underpinnings of the discipline are discussed. Students are instructed in the social and cultural variables that contributed to the development of psychology as a science. Connections are made between the early schools of psychology and contemporary perspectives in psychology. The growth and development of applied psychology and the professionalization of psychology are also described. prerequisite: PSYC 100 or an equivalent introductory psychology course or permission of the program director

  • PSYC 308 Research Methods and Statistics I (3)

    Integrated study of descriptive psychological research methods and corresponding statistical concepts. Topics include ethical considerations, observational and survey research techniques, graphing, central tendency and variability, correlation and linear regression. Students participate in data collection, data analysis and interpretation by means of the microcomputer Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) and in the writing of APA-style research reports. Laboratory fee required. prerequisites: PSYC 200 and satisfaction of lower-division general-education computer literacy requirement, or their equivalents; co-requisite: satisfactory completion of or concurrent enrollment in WRIT 300

  • PSYC 309 Research Methods and Statistics II (3)

    Integrated study of experimental and quasi-experimental psychological research methods and corresponding statistical concepts. Topics include basic probability theory, the logic of hypothesis testing, simple and complex experimental design and analysis, internal and external validity of experimental results, and nonparametric research and analysis of techniques. Students participate in data collection, data analysis and interpretation by means of the microcomputer Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) and in the writing of APA-style research reports. Laboratory fee required. prerequisite: PSYC 308

  • PSYC 315 Motivation (3)

    An exploration of internal and external forces that initiate, direct and sustain behavior. This course examines biological, cognitive and social psychological theories of motivation and their applications in a variety of real-life contexts. Students are encouraged to consider how these theories can increase their understandings of their own and others' behavior. prerequisite: PSYC 100 or an equivalent introductory psychology course or permission of the program director

  • PSYC 320 Industrial and Organizational Psychology (3)

    Psychological principles and methods applied to problems commonly encountered in business and industry. Topics include personnel selection and evaluation, training and development, attitudes and motivation, leadership, group dynamics, organizational structure and climate, and job design and working conditions. prerequisite: PSYC 100 or an equivalent introductory psychology course or permission of the program director

  • PSYC 325 Forensic Psychology (3)

    A survey of the broad field of forensic psychology, including roles that psychological knowledge, theory and practice have played with respect to issues of law and the legal system. Topics include psychological theories of crime, the psychological evaluation of criminal suspects, factors influencing the reliability of eyewitness testimony and psychological models of jury selection, among others. Students also learn the opportunities, demands and responsibilities associated with careers as forensic psychologists. prerequisite: PSYC 200 or CRJU 306 or permission of the psychology program director

  • PSYC 330 Health Psychology (3)

    Scientific psychology as applied to enhance health, prevent and treat disease, identify risk factors, improve the health-care system and shape public opinion with regard to health. The course focuses on the biopsychosocial model of health and the interactive influences of biological, behavioral and social factors on health, well-being and illness. prerequisite: PSYC 100 or an equivalent introductory psychology course or permission of the program director

  • PSYC 335 Theories of Personality (3)

    A study of contemporary theories attempting to describe, understand, explain, measure and predict the human as an integrated being. Laboratory fee required. prerequisite: PSYC 100 or an equivalent introductory psychology course or permission of the program director

  • PSYC 340 Counseling Psychology (3)

    An introduction to the applied psychology field of counseling. History, theories and processes of counseling are surveyed, as are a variety of specializations and settings in which counseling is practiced. Discussions, demonstrations and exercises give students an opportunity to explore counseling psychology as a career path. prerequisite: PSYC 100 or an equivalent introductory psychology course or permission of the program director

  • PSYC 345 Cognitive Psychology (3)

    An introduction to the scientific study of the mind, including historical and current issues, concepts, theoretical models, research methods and evidence regarding the physiological and psychological mechanisms, processes and content of thought. prerequisite: PSYC 100 or an equivalent introductory psychology course or permission of the program director

  • PSYC 350 Abnormal Psychology (3)

    An analysis of abnormal behavior as a personal, social and societal concern. Research findings relevant to diagnostic and therapeutic issues are studied. prerequisite: PSYC 100 or an equivalent introductory psychology course or permission of the program director

  • PSYC 355 Interviewing Psychology (3)

    A consideration of the principles and techniques of the interview as a personnel selection or research tool. Designed for students interested in the utilization of interview information in applied settings.

  • PSYC 360 Cross-Cultural Psychology (3)

    Educates, sensitizes and stimulates students' critical thinking about the role of culture relative to both consistencies and differences in human psychological functioning and social behavior. Focus is given to the effects of culture on human perceptions, emotions, expectations and values. Other areas that are explored are individualism vs. collectivism, moral reasoning, gender roles and how culture influences research strategies. prerequisite: PSYC 100 or equivalent

  • PSYC 365 Psychology of Gender (3)

    Explores the psychological, sociocultural, emotional, behavioral and physiological influences on the lives of women and men. The course focuses specifically on the psychological literature that addresses the many ways gender affects our experience. This course is designed to facilitate greater understanding of the unique expectations, constraints, dilemmas and experiences that face women and men. prerequisite: PSYC 100

  • PSYC 370 Psycholinguistics (3)

    An introduction to the study of the cognitive processes involved in how humans use language. Students learn about language from a psychological perspective, examining the cognitive aspects of meaning, understanding, communication, speech and language learning. Students learn the formal structure of language, how linguistic knowledge is represented and structured in the mind and how linguistic knowledge is utilized in the real-time processing of language. The course examines the biological and neurolinguistic foundations of language. Links with cognitive science, neuroscience and philosophy are also explored. Laboratory fee required. prerequisite: PSYC 100 or an equivalent introductory psychology course or permission of the program director

  • PSYC 380 Community Psychology (3)

    Introduction to the career path of community psychology. The interdependence among individuals, their communities and their environments is explored, with foci on local and regional social issues and policies, underserved and marginalized groups, prevention of social and mental health problems and related concepts such as social justice and social change. prerequisite: PSYC 100 or an equivalent introductory psychology course

  • PSYC 375 Environmental Psychology (3)

    Explores interrelationships between humans and the physical environment, both natural and constructed. This course surveys theories and evidence from various subdisciplines in psychology and applies this knowledge to an understanding of how human behavior affects an environment and how that environment, in turn, influences behavior. The course also explores the manipulation of psychological variables to design environments that promote specific behaviors. prerequisite: PSYC 100 or an equivalent introductory psychology course

  • PSYC 400 Theories of Learning (3)

    Investigation of the factors and processes involved in the acquisition and maintenance of new behavior. Both historical and current learning theories representing the dominant schools of psychological thought are presented, including modern understandings of the evolution and physiology of learning. Applications of current learning theories in various real-world, human contexts also are discussed. prerequisite: PSYC 300

  • PSYC 403 Training and Development (3)

    A comprehensive course designed to help the student develop the skills necessary to design and implement effective training programs. The course investigates needs assessment, the development of appropriate training efforts and the use of training program evaluations. Techniques included are the use of technology in CBT and Web-based training. Laboratory fee required. prerequisite: PSYC 100 or an equivalent introductory psychology course or permission of the program director

  • PSYC 404 Organizational Consulting (3)

    An upper-level, practitioner-oriented course. Students explore and develop skill sets necessary to consult successfully with various client systems. Using experiential learning settings, the focus is on demonstrating techniques of engaging, contracting, deploying interventions strategies and disengaging the client. Internal and external consulting models are included. Laboratory fee required. prerequisite: PSYC 100 or an equivalent introductory psychology course or permission of the program director

  • PSYC 405 Tests and Measurements (3)

    Introduction to the requirements for instruments used in the measurement of human behavior. Includes a study of the theory and methods of psychological measurement and a review of several representative types of tests. Laboratory fee required. prerequisite: PSYC 100 or an equivalent introductory psychology course and PSYC 309 or permission of the program director

  • PSYC 413 Psychopathology (3)

    An upper-division course preparing students for practice in any health-related field or for graduate school. Students learn about the symptoms, etiology, course, outcome and (to a minor extent) treatment of the major child and adult mental disorders from a biopsychosocial and multicultural perspective. Course materials focus on original sources and scholarly reviews to encourage critical and integrative thinking. prerequisite: PSYC 100 or an equivalent introductory psychology course and PSYC 350 or an equivalent abnormal psychology course or permission of the program director

  • PSYC 415 Evolutionary Psychology (3)

    Aspects of human psychology are examined from the perspective that current, species-common human thought processes and behaviors may be understood as evolved adaptations to problems faced by our evolutionary ancestors. Topics include environmental preferences and survival responses, male and female mating and parental attitudes and behaviors, and kinship-based and reciprocal altruism. prerequisite: PSYC 100 and PSYC 300 or permission of the program director

  • PSYC 425 Sensation and Perception (4)

    A study of the sensory processes and the methods and techniques for their measurement with emphasis on experimental study of perception. Laboratory fee required. prerequisite: PSYC 100 or an equivalent introductory psychology course and PSYC 309 or permission of the program director

  • PSYC 430 Physiological Psychology (3)

    A study of the biological substrates of behavior. The role of the central nervous system and its relationships to other physiological processes are examined as they affect the organism's adaptation to its environment. Laboratory fee required. prerequisite: PSYC 100 or an equivalent introductory psychology course or permission of the program director

  • PSYC 445 Psychology of Aging (3)

    A survey of the psychological theories of aging and the psychological changes in intellectual, emotional and social functioning; neuropsychological dysfunctions; and review of issues associated with retirement and economic self-maintenance. prerequisite: PSYC 100 or an equivalent introductory psychology course or permission of the program director

  • PSYC 446 Death, Dying and Bereavement (3)

    The profound influence of death on human behavior and its associated psychological effects. Death-related variables are identified and evaluated as to their contributions to the development of individual differences across the life span. Discussions center on current research and clinical findings about anxiety, depression, guilt, conflict and defense mechanisms, as well as techniques for death education and bereavement counseling. prerequisite: PSYC 100 or an equivalent introductory psychology course or permission of the program director

  • PSYC 455 Workshop in Counseling (3)

    A practicum experience for students to function as helping persons in a professional setting with intense supervision. prerequisite: PSYC 100 or an equivalent introductory psychology course and PSYC 340 or an equivalent counseling psychology course and permission of the program director

  • PSYC 490 Senior Project in Psychology (3)

    The capstone experience for psychology majors. Students design and conduct original, quantitative or qualitative studies of psychological topics of personal interest and share their own project problems, progress and outcomes in a weekly seminar. Completed projects are reported in both a formal, APA-style written report and orally as part of a psychology student colloquium. Grading: pass/fail. prerequisite: PSYC 200, PSYC 300, PSYC 308, PSYC 309 and PSYC 405 or their equivalents; senior status

  • PSYC 493 Honors Seminar (3)

    An advanced interdisciplinary seminar that focuses on important books and issues and encourages independent thinking, clear presentation and an understanding of the concerns and methods of various disciplines. The course may be team taught; topic and instructor(s) may change from semester to semester. Course may be repeated for credit when topic changes. prerequisite: 3.3 GPA and permission of the Denit Honors Program director

  • PSYC 494 Honors Project (3-6)

    Directed individual instruction in an advanced project of the student's choice; the project must be academically related to this discipline. Each student works closely with a faculty director who guides his/her progress. The project must be of honors quality and must be finally approved by both the faculty director and a second faculty member. Course is eligible for a continuing studies grade. prerequisite: 3.3 GPA and permission of both the Denit Honors Program director and the faculty director

  • PSYC 497 Topics in Psychology (3)

    An intensive exploration of topics in psychology of mutual interest to faculty and students. Content varies according to their concurrent interests. The subject studied appears under the Topics heading in the class schedule. Course may be repeated for credit when topic changes. prerequisite: permission of the program director

  • PSYC 499 Special Projects in Psychology (1-3)

    The pursuit of independent work under the supervision of a faculty member. Projects may include research in the laboratory or the library, supervised work in a psychological clinic or laboratory or at a training facility in a class. A student may earn up to 9 hours in this course but cannot take more than 3 hours per semester. Exact course credit for any project is determined by the program director. Course is eligible for a continuing studies grade. prerequisite: permission of the program director