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Merrick School of Business Course Descriptions

Browse the course descriptions of all courses that the Merrick School of Business offers.

  • ACCT: Accounting

    ACCT 201 INTRODUCTION TO FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING (3)

    A comprehensive study of basic financial accounting processes applicable to a service, merchandising, and manufacturing business. An analysis of transactions, journalizing, posting, preparation of working papers and ­financial statements.

    ACCT 202 INTRODUCTION TO MANAGERIAL ACCOUNTING (3)

    An introductory study of managerial accounting processes including job order costing, process costing, cost-volume-profit analysis, standard costs, activity-based costing, cost analysis, budgeting, and managerial decision making. Prerequisite: ACCT 201 or equivalent with a minimum grade of C.

    ACCT 301 INTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTING I (3)

    A study of financial accounting ­standard setting, the conceptual framework underlying financial accounting, balance sheet and income statement ­presentations, revenue and expense ­recognition, and accounting for current assets, and current liabilities. Prerequisite: ACCT 202 with a minimum grade of C.

    ACCT 302 INTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTING II (3)

    This class is the second course of the three-semester sequence of intermediate financial accounting. This course focuses on issues related to the reporting and analysis of financial accounting information. The objective in this course is to examine in detail (with an emphasis on both the "what" and the "why") the following financial topics: 1) Operational Assets 2) Time value of money 3) Bonds and long term notes 4) Leases 5) Employee benefits and pensions. Prerequisite: ACCT301 or equivalent with a minimum grade of C.

    ACCT 306 COST ACCOUNTING (3)

    A study of cost behavior, overhead cost ­allocations, cost systems design, and an introduction to activity-based costing and control systems. Emphasis is on case studies and other practical applications. Prerequisite: ACCT 202 with minimum grade of C.

    ACCT 310 INTERMED ACCOUNTING III (3)

    The third course in a three-course sequence for accounting majors. A comprehensive view of financial accounting concepts and principles, an intensive look at the nature and determination of the major financial statements, and an examination of current accounting practice, theory, and literature. Topics include shareholders' equity, investments, income taxes, earnings per share, accounting changes, error analysis, and statement of cash flows. Prerequisite: ACCT 302 or equivalent with a minimum grade of C.

    ACCT 317 ACCOUNTING INFORMATION SYSTEMS (3)

    A study of fundamental accounting system concepts, the technology of accounting systems, file processing and data bases, the utilization of accounting ­system technology, accounting system applications, the internal control of accounting information, and the development and operation of accounting systems. Projects use manual and computer-based transaction processing systems. Prerequisite: Prior or concurrent enrollment in ACCT 301.

    ACCT 401 AUDITING (3)

    A study of Generally Accepted Auditing Standards and other standards. Topics covered include professional standards, professional ethics, audit planning, internal control, audit evidence, completing the audit, audit reports and standards for different assurance and non-assurance services. Prerequisites: Acct 302 with a minimium grade of C / Merrick School of Business student or by permission of the instructor.

    ACCT 402 Seminar in Assurance Services (3)

    A study of auditing and other assurance services with an emphasis on the world of auditing that exists outside of the college textbook. Special emphasis is given to legal liability, statistical sampling, audits of SEC registrants, research using the AICPA auditing database, and other assurance services. A case study approach is used to attempt to create a realistic view of how an auditor organizes and carries out an audit examination. Prerequisite: OPRE 202 and ACCT 401 or equivalent with a minimum grade of C.

    ACCT 403 Advanced Financial Reporting (3)

    A study of business combinations and the preparation of consolidated financial statements for consolidated enterprises, fund-type accounting for governmental units and not-for-profit entities, accounting for partnerships, and accounting for multi-national enterprises. Prerequisite: ACCT 302 or equivalent with a minimum grade of C.

    ACCT 404 ADVANCED COST ACCOUNTING (3)

    An advanced study of the concepts of process cost accounting, cost behavior, overhead cost allocations, cost system design, activity-based costing and control systems. Emphasis is on case study analysis and other practical applications of cost accounting practices to various business enterprises. Prerequisite: ACCT 306 or equivalent

    ACCT 405 INCOME TAXATION (3)

    A study and analysis of the federal income tax structure with emphasis upon the taxation of individuals. Topics include income determination, deductions, property transactions, credits, procedures, and an introduction to corporation and partnership taxation, tax planning and ethical issues. Prerequisite: ACCT 202 or equivalent with a minimum grade of C.

    ACCT 406 ADVANCED TAXATION (3)

    A continuation of the study of the federal income tax structure with emphasis on the taxation of business entities, including corporations, partnerships and entities taxed as partnerships and S corporations. Also introduces gift and estate taxes and income taxation of estates and trusts. Prerequisite: ACCT 405 or equivalent.

    ACCT 411 SEMINAR IN ACCOUNTING (3)

    A detailed study of current problems and contemporary developments in accounting literature, reports, and bulletins and a review of financial accounting theory as it relates to current accounting practices. Prerequisite: ACCT 302 or equivalent with a minimum grade of B-. Merrick School of Business student, or by permission of the instructor.

    ACCT 412 Introduction to Forensic Accounting (3)

    Provides an overview of the field of forensic accounting, focusing on the roles, responsibilities and requirements of a forensic accountant in both litigation and fraud engagements. Examines basic litigation and fraud examination theory, identifies financial fraud schemes, explores the legal framework for damages and fraud and damage assessments and methodologies, and reviews earning management and financial reporting fraud. Other topics include computer forensics and corporate governance and ethics. Actual litigation and fraud cases are used to highlight the evolving roles of forensic accounting.

    ACCT 413 Ethical Issues in Accounting (3)

    Considers business ethics issues within an accounting context from a multiple stakeholder perspective. Ethical theories, codes of ethics relevant to accountants, corporate governance and professional and corporate social responsibility are covered. The course emphasizes the application of concepts such as professionalism, integrity, independence and objectivity to individual decision-making.

    ACCT 414 Federal and State Government Accounting (3)

    The course covers the basics of federal, state and local (municipal) accounting with particular focus on fund accounting and issues specific to the accounting by the US Federal Government. The course coverage will roughly approximate the curriculum of Part II and III of Exam II of Certified Government Financial Manager examination.

    ACCT 493 HONORS SEMINAR (3)

    An advanced interdisciplinary seminar that focuses on important books and issues and encourages independent thinking, clear presentation and an understanding of the concerns and methods of various disciplines. The course may be team taught; topic and instructor(s) may change from semester to semester. Course may be repeated for credit when topic changes. prerequisites: 3.3 GPA and permission of the Denit Honors Program director

    ACCT 494 HONORS PROJ/THESIS (3 - 6)

    Directed individual instruction in an advanced project of the student's choice; the project must be academically related to this discipline. Each student works closely with a faculty director who guides his/her progress. The project must be of honors quality and must be finally approved by both the faculty director and a second faculty member. Course is eligible for a continuing studies grade. prerequisite: 3.3 GPA and permission of both the Denit Honors Program director and the faculty director

    ACCT 495 ACCOUNTING INTERNSHIP (3)

    Provides students with real-world accounting experience. The course requires approximately 175 hours of practical work with a qualified firm based on explicit statements of student responsibilities and faculty/firm monitoring mechanisms. Students will work closely with both the firm and a faculty member. It is recommended that students complete an internship in their junior year. prerequisites: Completion of nine semester hours of accounting with a minimum GPA of 3.0. Completion of MGMT 330 or permission of the instructor. Permission of the instructor is required.

    ACCT 497 SPECIAL TOPIC: (3)

    The accounting faculty, from time to time, offer an opportunity to integrate new material into the undergraduate program reflecting changes in the field and in the educational needs of students. Prerequisites: ACCT 202 or equivalent with a grade of C or better or instructor permission.

    ACCT 499 INDEPENDENT STUDY: ACCOUNTING (1 - 3)

    An in-depth study of a specific accounting topic performed on an independent basis by the student under the direction of a faculty member. Completion of a major paper as part of the independent study is required. For eligibility and ­procedures, refer to the Merrick School of Business Independent Study Policy.

    ACCT 505 ACCOUNTING ESSENTIALS (1.50)

    Introduces students to the basics of corporate financial reporting and financial statement analysis from the manager’s perspective. Emphasizes the analysis of financial statements and provides an overview of U.S. Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP) and International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS) rules for most critical accounting items. prerequisite: graduate standing

    ACCT 510 INTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTING I (3)

    A study of financial accounting standard-setting, the conceptual framework underlying financial accounting, balance sheet and income statement presentations, revenue and expense recognition, and accounting for current assets and current liabilities. Prerequisite: ACCT 505 or equivalent.

    ACCT 511 INTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTING II (3)

    A continuation of ACCT 510 with emphasis on accounting for investments, dilutive securities, long-term liabilities, fixed assets, intangible assets, stockholders’ equity and earnings per share. Graduate equivalent of ACCT 302. prerequisite: ACCT 510 or equivalent

    ACCT 512 AUDITING ACCOUNTING SYSTEM (3)

    A study of generally accepted auditing standards with emphasis on professional standards, planning, internal control, audit evidence, audit sampling and standard reports for the various attestation functions. Also includes fundamental accounting systems, accounting system applications, the internal control of accounting information, the development and operation of accounting systems and methods for auditing computerized accounting systems. prerequisite: ACCT 511 or equivalent

    ACCT 513 INTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTING III / ADVANCED ACCOUNTING (3)

    A continuation of ACCT 510 and ACCT 511. Topics include leases, pensions, error correction, accounting changes, accounting for income taxes, statement of cash flows and foreign currency transactions and translations. Also includes the study of business combinations and the preparation of consolidated financial statements, fund accounting for governmental units and other nonprofit organizations and accounting for partnerships. prerequisite: ACCT 511 or equivalent

    ACCT 514 Fundamentals of Income Taxation (3)

    A study and analysis of the federal income tax structure with emphasis on the taxation of individuals. Topics include income determination, deductions, property transactions, credits and procedures, and an introduction to corporation and partnership taxation, tax planning and ethical issues. Prerequisite: ACCT 505 or equivalent.

    ACCT 601 FORENSIC ACCOUNTING PRINCIPLES (3)

    Provides an overview of the field of forensic accounting, focusing on the roles, responsibilities and requirements of a forensic accountant in both litigation and fraud engagements. Examines basic litigation and fraud examination theory, identifies financial fraud schemes, explores the legal framework for damages and fraud and damage assessments and methodologies, and reviews earning management and financial reporting fraud. Other topics include computer forensics and corporate governance and ethics. Actual litigation and fraud cases are used to highlight the evolving roles of forensic accounting. ACCT 505 or equivalent.

    ACCT 602 DISSECTING FINANCIAL STATEMENT (3)

    Students learn how to review, detect and investigate possible financial statement concerns of publicly and privately held businesses, as well as those of nonprofit organizations and family businesses. Topics include legal elements of financial statement fraud, management’s and auditors’ responsibilities, improper revenue/sales recognition, inadequate disclosure of related-party transactions, improper asset valuation, improper deferral of costs and expenses, financial statement red flags and inadequacies in management’s discussion and analysis. Students learn how to detect and investigate possible financial statement problems by addressing such factors as off-balance sheet activity, liquidity, financial performance indicators, unreported intangibles and lease auditing. Prerequisite: ACCT 505 or equivalent.

    ACCT 603 INVESTIGATIVE ACCOUNTING AND FRAUD EXAMINATION (3)

    Topics include the in-depth review of sophisticated fraud schemes, how fraudulent conduct can be deterred, how allegations of fraud should be investigated and resolved, the recovery of assets, methods of writing effective reports and complying with SAS 82 and other fraud standards. Fraud and investigation topics cover acts of skimming, cash larceny, check tampering, register disbursement schemes, billing schemes, payroll and expense reimbursement schemes, improper accounting of inventory and other assets, corruption, bribery, conflicts of interest, security fraud, insurance fraud, anti-terrorist financing and money laundering. Prerequisite: ACCT 505 or equivalent.

    ACCT 604 LITIGATION SUPPORT (3)

    Addresses the relationship between the forensic accounting professional and the litigation process in which he or she may play a role. Specifically, this course covers the litigation process, the legal framework for damages and fraud, damage assessment methodologies, issues related to the presentation of evidence through expert testimony, practices used in supporting divorce cases and basic rules of evidence as they apply to forensic accountants. Prerequisite: ACCT 505 or equivalent.

    ACCT 605 PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT AND ACCOUNTING CONTROLS (3)

    Focuses on how managers can use accounting information in the budgeting process to assist them in planning, controlling and making decisions. Introduces students to internal controls, corporate governance and enterprise risk management. Prerequisites: ACCT 505 or equivalent.

    ACCT 630 CONTEMPORARY ISSUES IN FINANCIAL REPORTING (3)

    Explores theoretical and conceptual foundations of generally accepted accounting principles and practices as well as certain other principles and practices not generally accepted. Recent and current literature is studied to provide coverage of the basic postulates, assumptions and standards underlying the measurement criteria and practices of financial accounting. prerequisite: ACCT 511 or equivalent

    ACCT 655 TAX POLICY (3)

    Explores the evolution and structure of the federal income tax system from a public policy perspective. Focus is placed on legal, economic, social and practical considerations. Alternatives, including current legislative proposals, are considered. Students prepare a research paper on a topic related to tax policy.

    ACCT 680 TAXATION OF ENTITIES (3)

    Covers federal income taxation of corporations, partnerships, estates and trusts as well as the taxation of gifts and estates. Analysis includes consideration of the sources of tax law, weight or authority, ethical issues, planning and administrative procedures. prerequisite: ACCT 405 or equivalent

    ACCT 701 ACCOUNTING ETHICS (3)

    ACCT 701: Accounting Ethics - Considers business ethics issues within an accounting context from a multiple stakeholder perspective. Ethical theories, codes of ethics relevant to accountants, corporate governance and professional and corporate social responsibility are covered. The course emphasizes the application of concepts such as professionalism, integrity, independence and objectivity to individual decision-making.

    ACCT 702 Federal and State Government Accounting (3)

    This course covers the basic of federal, state and local (municipal) accounting with particular focus on fund accounting and issues specific to the accounting by the US Federal Government. The course coverage will roughly approximate the curriculum of Parts II and III of Exam II of Certified Government Financial Manager examination.

    ACCT 720 DESIGN OF MANAGERIAL COST AND CONTROL SYSTEMS (3)

    Explores the design of cost and control systems for decision-making and for measurement of the performance of processes, product lines, managers and organizational competitiveness. Case studies highlight the experiences of companies, and include modifying cost and control systems in response to technological, institutional and global changes. prerequisites: ACCT 306, ACCT 605 or equivalent

    ACCT 740 ADVANCED TOPICS IN ASSURANCE SERVICES (3)

    A study of the application of generally accepted auditing standards to auditing practice issues, of academic and practitioner research, of internal auditing, of EDP auditing and of governmental auditing issues. prerequisite: ACCT 512 or equivalent

    ACCT 752 ADVANCED TOPICS IN ACCOUNTING SYSTEMS (3)

    Covers current and emerging trends, technologies and practices in accounting systems. Topics include accounting software for specific industries, the evaluation of accounting software, electronic data interchange, client/server and other accounting systems, work flow and technology, decision support and expert accounting systems, auditing computer-based accounting systems, analyzing benefits and costs, implementation issues and research in accounting systems. Projects require the use of advanced transaction processing systems and database software. prerequisite: ACCT 512 or equivalent

    ACCT 755 GOVERNMENTAL AND NOT-FOR-PROFIT ACCOUNTING (3)

    An advanced study of generally accepted accounting principles and procedures of governmental units and not-for-profit organizations, emphasizing current issues, external financial reporting and the relevant authoritative accounting pronouncements. Topics include characteristics and types of not-for-profit organizations, accounting and reporting entity, fund accounting, budgetary accounts, contributions received and made, investments and the encumbrance system. prerequisite: ACCT 511 or equivalent

    ACCT 761 ACCOUNTING FOR HEALTH-CARE ORGANIZATIONS (3)

    Covers financial reporting, analysis and strategy principles applied to for-profit and not-for-profit health-care organizations. Financial and managerial accounting issues related to strategic decision-making are emphasized. Review of the authoritative health-care accounting literature, overview of the health-care accounting environment, issues in revenue and expense recognition, balance sheet valuations, budgetary control systems, cost accounting, performance measurement, and the financial implications of third-party payment systems and managed-care arrangements. prerequisite: ACCT 505

    ACCT 762 ACCOUNTING FOR MEDICARE REGULATION (3)

    Focuses on principles and applications of Medicare payment systems and rate regulation for health-care providers, emphasizing understanding the Medicare system, developing the technical skills required to identify and research problems in Medicare payments, isolating relevant regulatory issues and developing documentary support and arguments for proposed solutions to problems in health-care payment claims. Topics include Medicare and the American health-care system, Part A hospital insurance benefits, Part B supplementary medical insurance benefits, exclusions from coverage, fraud and abuse, physician self-referral, payments rules, cost reports, claims and appeals, and managed care plans. prerequisite: ACCT 505 or equivalent

    ACCT 770 SEMINAR IN CURRENT TOPICS IN ACCOUNTING (3)

    A study of current developments and contemporary problems in accounting. Topics vary from year to year. A significant writing and research experience is provided. prerequisite: ACCT 511 or equivalent

    ACCT 780 SUSTAINABILITY ACCOUNTING (3)

    Sustainability accounting concerns the process of identifying, measuring and reporting the entities’ impact on the planet with a focus mainly on the environmental impact. Determining how different entities affect the environment, measuring that impact and deciding what, how and to whom to report this impact are all part of this course. The course will cover topics dealing with greenhouse gas emission, trading and sustainability investing. prerequisite: ACCT 605

    ACCT 795 GRADUATE ACCOUNTING INTERNSHIP (3)

    Students will attain professional accounting experience and work on assigned projects within a workplace accounting environment. Requirements include a work supervisor evaluation, a journal detailing the work experience, and a self-assessment of the student's internship experience. Prerequisite: Admission to the MS in Accounting and Business Advisory Services Program and permission of the graduate director of the accounting program.

    ACCT 797 SPECIAL TOPICS IN ACCOUNTING (3)

    Specialized topics in accounting, allowing flexibility for both the changing developments in accounting and the educational needs of students. Exact topics and prerequisite structure appear in the schedule of classes. prerequisite: ACCT 605

    ACCT 799 INDIVIDUAL RESEARCH (3)

    prerequisites: approval of accounting instructor, department chair and academic adviser

  • BULA: Business Law

    BULA 151 BUSINESS LAW I (3)

    A basic study of the judicial system, contracts, agency, fraud, sale of personal property, warranties, transfer of title, and legal remedies.

    BULA 251 BUSINESS LAW II (3)

    A detailed study of the law of bailments, public carriers, negotiable instruments, secured transactions, real property, personal property, landlord and tenant rights and obligations, real estate mortgages, wills and estate of descendants, trusts, insurance, suretyship, guaranty, bankruptcy and labor law. Representative CPA law questions are reviewed and discussed. Note: Business Law II cannot be substituted for a 300- or 400-level business or management elective. prerequisite: BULA 151

  • ECON: Economics

    ECON 100 ECONOMICS OF CONTEMPORARY ISSUES (3)

    Provides a survey of societal issues examined through the lens of economic analysis. A scientific approach is adopted in which the basic tools of economics are ¬applied to social issues such as pollution, crime and prevention, poverty and discrimination, professional sports and economic growth. Students gain an appreciation of how society addresses the conflict between unlimited wants and scarce ¬resources. [SOSC] [GIK] [SBS]

    ECON 200 THE ECONOMIC WAY OF THINKING (3)

    An economist sees the world in a unique way and is able to provide a different perspective on many issues. This course presents the “economic way of thinking” with an emphasis on being able to make effective decisions in a wide variety of economic and business situations. In addition, the “economic way of thinking” is used to understand the impact of business and government policies and actions on our daily lives. [SOSC] [QQT] [SBS]

    ECON 305 MANAGERIAL ECONOMICS (3)

    Managers and business professionals need the wide variety of tools provided by economic theory to deal with the many complex issues facing organizations in today’s competitive global markets. This course focuses on the economic forces affecting the process of organizing ­economic activity. The primary tools of analysis are imperfect information, transaction costs, and the voluntary pursuit of efficiency. Prerequisite:ECON 200, or three hours of micro or macro economics , ACCT 202, and OPRE 202

    ECON 308 MONEY AND BANKING (3)

    Money and Banking focuses on financial markets and their interaction with the stability and growth of the U.S. economy. The course will be useful for all undergraduate business majors and will encourage a sound understanding and appreciation of topics frequently cited in the business press.

    ECON 312 INTRODUCTION TO ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT (3)

    This course introduces students to local economic development from the perspective of the real estate industry and economic development professionals. Students will become familiar with theoretical frameworks of urban economies including theories of the location of economic activity and the principles of urban economic development, housing, transportation, poverty, and unemployment and municipal finance. Students are also exposed to economic development finance including the fundamentals of bond finance, tax increment financing, among others. Students will learn specific techniques in assessing local economies for business attraction and retention strategies such as location quotients, shift-share analysis and input-output analysis. While there is no formal pre-requisite, previous coursework in economics is recommended. [GD]

    ECON 409 INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS (3)

    A broad coverage of international issues, providing a starting point for the analysis and insights available from other business disciplines. Topics include the underlying rationale for trade, market mechanisms, efficiency, exchange rates, balance of payments and some aspects of international economic development. prerequisite: ECON 200 or 3 hours of micro- or macroeconomics

    ECON 493 HONORS SEMINAR (3)

    An advanced interdisciplinary seminar that focuses on important books and issues and encourages independent thinking, clear presentation and an understanding of the concerns and methods of various disciplines. The course may be team taught; topic and instructor(s) may change from semester to semester. Course may be repeated for credit when topic changes. prerequisites: 3.3 GPA and permission of the Denit Honors Program director

    ECON 494 HONORS PROJ/THESIS (3 - 6)

    Directed individual instruction in an advanced project of the student's choice; the project must be academically related to this discipline. Each student works closely with a faculty director who guides his/her progress. The project must be of honors quality and must be finally approved by both the faculty director and a second faculty member. Course is eligible for a continuing studies grade. prerequisites: 3.3 GPA and permission of both the Denit Honors Program director and the faculty director

    ECON 497 SPECIAL TOPICS IN ECONOMICS (3)

    The economics and finance faculty, from time to time, offer an opportunity to integrate new material into the undergraduate ­program reflecting changes in the field and in the educational needs of ­students. Prerequisites: ECON 305 and six additional hours of economics.

    ECON 499 INDEPENDENT STUDY: ECONOMICS (1 - 3)

    An independent study completed under the direction of a faculty member. For eligibility and ­procedures, refer to the Merrick School of Business Independent Study Policy.

    ECON 505 MICRO ECONOMICS (1.50)

    Covers comparative advantage, supply and demand, elasticity, opportunity cost, competition and monopoly, and externalities. Emphasizes understanding concepts that are useful in making effective choices in a variety of economic and managerial situations. prerequisite: graduate standing

    ECON 506 MACRO ECONOMICS (1.50)

    Covers economic growth, monetary and fiscal policy, inflation and unemployment. Emphasizes understanding concepts, such as Federal Reserve policy, that are useful for managerial decision-making. prerequisite: graduate standing

    ECON 605 BUSINESS AND PUBLIC POLICY IN A GLOBAL ECONOMY (1.50)

    This course uses an economic framework to analyze and evaluate public policy issues that may affect businesses. Ethical and managerial implications are integrated. Applications of the framework include globalization, environmental, and health care issues.

    ECON 650 BUSINESS ECONOMICS (3)

    Applies macro-, micro- and global economic theory, drawing on analytical techniques and other business areas, to understand the financial environment of the firm. Based on an understanding of market behavior, the course examines global competitiveness, regulation and pricing. Attention then turns toward the impact of global and macroeconomic forces acting on organizations. Students will be expected to demonstrate analytical skills in solving real-world problems, with an emphasis on the financial conduct and structure of the firm. prerequisites: ECON 505,ECON 506 and OPRE 505, OPRE 506

    ECON 720 INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS AND FINANCE (3)

    Covers the framework of international economics and finance. Topics covered include classical trade theory, balance of payment, models of open economy, export and import economic policies and trade performance, foreign exchange markets, currency options and futures markets, international money markets and capital markets. Specific application will be made to European, Asian and Latin American markets. prerequisite: ECON 505 and ECON 506

    ECON 741 SPORTS ECONOMICS (3)

    The sports world offers a unique arena to illustrate many important economic concepts because incentives affect the behavior of individuals in the sport industry--players, managers, owners, and fans--just like they affect behavior in any other industry. This course will allow you to study sports and the sports industry using the models found in economics. This course is loosely organized according to the fields of industrial organization, public finance, and labor economics to allow for an investigation of many of the issues that regularly come up in sports. Topics include league makeup, stadium financing, team location, competitive balance,and incentive structures. Prerequisite: ECON 605

    ECON 765 THE HEALTH SERVICES SYSTEMS (3)

    An overview of the U.S. health-care system, including health care as a product and the role of all stakeholders: patients, physicians, staff, hospitals, insurers, employers and the government. Topics include the impact of cost containment and competition on management within hospitals and on physician-hospital relations; alternate delivery systems (HMOs, PPOs); multiunit systems; what makes health care different from standard economic markets; health-care marketing; health insurance, including (a) uninsured/uncompensated care and (b) poorly informed but heavily insured customers; a larger not-for-profit sector and heavy government involvement; and legal aspects of health care, including social, moral and ethical issues. prerequisite: ECON 505 and ECON 506

    ECON 797 SPECIAL TOPICS IN ECONOMIC MANAGEMENT (3)

    Specialized topics in economics allowing flexibility for both the changing developments in business and the educational needs of students. Topic areas may include econometrics, entrepreneurship or organizational architecture. Exact listing of topics and prerequisites may be listed in schedule of classes. prerequisite: ECON 504 or area approval

    ECON 799 INDIVIDUAL RESEARCH (1 - 3)

    Individual research in an area of interest to the student. The expectation is that work equivalent to a regular graduate course will be completed. Formal paper(s) will be written under the supervision of a full-time faculty member. prerequisites: approval of both an economics faculty member and the department chair

  • ENTR: Entrepreneurship

    ENTR 101 IMAGINATION,CREATIVITY AND ENTREPRENEURSHIP (3)

    Students will experience what it means to discover the patterns that produce breakthrough ideas when attempting to solve business problems. Participants in this class will be exposed to a systematic approach to changing the way they create, identify and sell these ideas. They will also be introduced to a number of techniques, concepts and methods that can be added to their creative skills toolkit. The course is designed around real methods that have been proven to work in some of the leading corporations in the world. These methods are conveyed through both interactive and experiential learning approaches. Students will form teams for the purposes of developing creative solutions to problems and coming up with a concept around which a venture can be based. [CTE] [SBS]

    ENTR 300 THE ENTREPRENEURIAL EXPERIENCE (3)

    The entrepreneurial process considered as a paradigm, tracing the process and highlighting its practical applications. Special emphasis on the creation and initial growth phases of new ventures, with discussion of related ethical, international and legal issues. Local entrepreneurs serve as guest speakers. Open to all students, this course functions as a survey course as well as the first in the specialization in entrepreneurship sequence.

    ENTR 320 OPPORTUNITY ASSESSMENT AND DEVELOPMENT (3)

    Developing the analytical and conceptual skills required to test the feasibility of a concept for a new venture. A venture feasibility study involves undertaking activities that may help determine whether one should go forward with an opportunity. The process of feasibility analysis involves identifying, evaluating and determining whether to exploit an opportunity. Students will learn a number of practical skills and techniques that are applied to opportunities that students will explore. The creation of a feasibility study is the primary activity of the class. The course involves a significant amount of outside work that is time consuming, ambiguous, complex and multi-functional in nature. Feasibility analysis forces students to: undertake a significant amount of field research; develop and think critically about business concepts; answer fundamental questions about strategic, marketing, financial, operational and human resource issues about business concepts; and then research a decision about going forward to start the venture that is proposed. prerequisite: ENTR 300

    ENTR 390 ENTREPRENEURSHIP MENTORSHIP (1)

    Linked to the first three practice in the Entrepreneurship Fellows Program. Consists of approximately 4 hours per week of mentorship with a local expert entrepreneur. Prerequisite: Status as an Entrepreneurship Fellow. Department permission required.

    ENTR 430 CAPITAL ACQUISITION & STRATEGIC FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT FOR ENTREPRE VENTURES. (3)

    Provides knowledge and training in the area of capital acquisition strategies and tactics through the life cycle of an entrepreneurial venture, and coverage of valuation techniques as applied to the allocation of business assets. Topics include start-up and mezzanine financing, and bridging to initial public offers on the capital acquisition side, as well as capital budgeting and internal control techniques applied in the strategic context developed in earlier courses. Prerequisite: ENTR 300/ Merrick School of Business or by permission of the instructor

    ENTR 450 ENTREPRENEURIAL ORGANIZATION, PLANNING & IMPLEMENTATION (3)

    The capstone course of the specialization in entrepreneurship. Students apply knowledge and experience gained in prior courses to develop and implement a new venture. Outside entrepreneurs bring real-world problems to class and students participate in field experiences. Emphasis is placed on creating and continuously enhancing an overall management system to guide the entrepreneurial venture as it grows. Prerequisites: ENTR 300 and ENTR 320 / Merrick School of Business student or by permission of the instructor

    ENTR 460 SOCIAL ENTERPRISE (3)

    Successful nonprofit organizations are consistently challenged to expand their impact, be socially responsible and fiscally accountable, and find new sources of revenue. In response, more and more organizations are discovering innovative ways to generate both financial and social returns on their investments. Students and selected nonprofits learn about successful ventures and engage in lectures and hands-on work to determine the feasibility of entrepreneurial ideas, recognize and overcome financial obstacles, and convert social venture ideas into reality. prerequisites: FIN 331 and ENTR 300 / Merrick School of Business student or by permission of instructor

    ENTR 490 ENTREPRENEURIAL STRATEGY (3)

    One of the courses that comprise the final practicum in the Entrepreneurship Fellows program. Using entrepreneurial strategy as the integrating framework, students reflect on what they have learned in the program, integrate that learning with their new venture concept and prepare to launch their new venture upon or before graduation. prerequisites: status as an Entrepreneurship Fellow and completion of the Entrepreneurial Opportunities and Markets, Human Capital in a New Venture and Economics of New Venture Financing practica

    ENTR 493 HONORS SEMINAR (3)

    An advanced interdisciplinary seminar that focuses on important books and issues and encourages independent thinking, clear presentation and an understanding of the concerns and methods of various disciplines. The course may be team taught; topic and instructor(s) may change from semester to semester. Course may be repeated for credit when topic changes. prerequisites: 3.3 GPA and permission of the Denit Honors Program director

    ENTR 494 HONORS PROJ/THESIS (3 - 6)

    Directed individual instruction in an advanced project of the student's choice; the project must be academically related to this discipline. Each student works closely with a faculty director who guides his/her progress. The project must be of honors quality and must be finally approved by both the faculty director and a second faculty member. Course is eligible for a continuing studies grade. prerequisites: 3.3 GPA and permission of both the Denit Honors Program director and the faculty director

    ENTR 497 SPECIAL TOPICS IN ENTREPRENEURSHIP (3)

    The entrepreneurship faculty, from time to time, offer an opportunity to integrate new material into the undergraduate program reflecting changes in the field and in the educational needs of students. Prerequisite: ENTR 300.

    ENTR 499 INDEPENDENT STUDY (1 - 6)

    An independent study completed under the direction of a faculty member. For eligibility and procedures, refer to the Merrick School of Business Independent Study Policy.

    ENTR 605 CREATIVITY AND THE ENTREPRENEURIAL MINDSET (1.50)

    Focuses on personal and organizational creativity and enables students to recognize and develop creative abilities in organizations. Includes a final team-based new product pitch that allows students to apply creativity in a business context. prerequisite: graduate standing

    ENTR 760 SOCIAL ENTERPRISE AND ENTREPRENEURSHIP (3)

    Provides a study of how successful nonprofit organizations respond to the challenges of expanding their impact, being socially responsible and fiscally accountable, and finding new sources of revenue. The course will investigate innovative ways to generate both financial and social returns on their investments. Students will engage with live social entrepreneurs to evaluate and respond to market opportunities to develop and grow social enterprises. prerequisite: FIN 505 or permission of instructor.

    ENTR 771 THE DESIGN /BUSINESS LINK (3)

    Design could very well be the major competitive strategy for both manufacturing and service companies. This course has two goals: 1) to provide UB students with an understanding of the role of design in today’s business organizations to more effectively use design to achieve the mutual goals of businesspeople and designers, and 2) to teach students how they can invent, produce and distribute their own products and be entrepreneurs. prerequisite: MKTG 505 or area approval

  • FIN: Finance

    FIN 300 PERSONAL FINANCE (3)

    A practical introduction to financial concepts and tools such as the time value of money, risk-return tradeoffs, asset pricing models, the efficient market hypothesis, financial databases and Internet searches. Students learn to apply these concepts and tools to personal financial decisions about housing, personal and small business borrowing, insurance, income taxes, retirement planning and investments in common stock, bonds, mutual funds, and futures and options. FIN 300 may not be used as a specialization course by finance majors.

    FIN 330 EXCEL for Financial Analysis (3)

    Provides students with skills in the use of EXCEL spreadsheets to prepare and present analyses for personal, corporate, real estate and investment finance. prerequisite: Prior or concurrent enrollment in FIN 331

    FIN 331 FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT (3)

    An overview and understanding of fundamental principles of financial decision-making and their application to internal and external problem-solving by the business enterprise. Topics include financial statement analysis and forecasting, time value of money and security valuation, corporate capital budgeting, cost of capital and capital structure. Thematic coverage encompasses the traditional, international and ethical dimensions of financial decision-making. prerequisites: ACCT 201, ECON 200 or 3 hours of micro- or macroeconomics, and MATH 115

    FIN 332 FINANCIAL MODELING AND COMMUNICATION (3)

    Designed to equip students with a working knowledge of the technical methods and tools of financial analysis, as well as to provide them with the ability to design and implement -professional-quality written, oral and electronic presentation of their results. Topics include financial statement constructions, creating exhibits for presentation of financial information, and analysis and communication of corporate financial policy. prerequisites: FIN 331 and INSS 300

    FIN 333 INVESTMENT ANALYSIS AND PORTFOLIO MANAGEMENT (3)

    An understanding of the basic valuation principles for financial instruments such as ­common stocks, bonds, and futures and options. These instruments are studied in the context of modern portfolio theory. Company and industry analysis projects provide the chance for practical experience. Prerequisite: FIN 331.

    FIN 420 RISK AND INSURANCE (3)

    Fundamental concepts of insurance/reinsurance products as risk management tools for individuals and corporations. Topics include the regulatory environment, financial operations of insurance companies and the role of the capital market in the risk management process.

    FIN 430 ENTREPRENEURIAL ORGANIZATION AND FINANCE (3)

    Provides knowledge and training in the area of capital acquisition strategies and tactics through the life cycle of an entrepreneurial venture and coverage of valuation techniques as applied to the allocation of business areas. Topics include start-up and mezzanine financing and bridging to initial public offers on the capital budgeting and internal control techniques applied in the strategic context developed in earlier courses. Prerequisite: FIN 331.

    FIN 433 INTERNATIONAL FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT (3)

    In global financial markets, exchange rate risk exposure demands careful management and the use of financial instruments for hedging currency risk. These include currency options, futures and swaps. Working capital management and long-term financing and investment decisions are also crucial to today’s financial managers and need to be understood in the context of expanding global financial markets. Prerequisite: FIN 331.

    FIN 450 PROFESSIONAL FINANCE PORTFOLIO (3)

    Students apply finance tools and techniques to business plans for selected nonprofit and for-profit firms. Nonprofit firms are assisted in establishing profit-making subsidiaries. Over the semester, students learn about successful ventures and engage in lectures and hands-on experiences. The students’ work for external firms focuses on determining the feasibility of entrepreneurial ideas, analyzing financial obstacles and converting ideas into reality. Prerequisite: FIN 330 and FIN 331 / Merrick School of Business student

    FIN 470 REAL ESTATE INVESTMENTS (3)

    Introduces the fundamentals of real estate investment analysis, including elements of mortgage financing and taxation, and applies the standard tools of financial analysis and economics to real estate valuation. Topics include traditional and nontraditional appraisal methods, techniques of real estate financing, real estate work-outs, innovations in real estate financing and the relationship to the macroeconomic environment. prerequisites: FIN 331

    FIN 471 REAL ESTATE FINANCE (3)

    Analyzes the instruments, techniques and institutions of real estate finance. Emphasis is placed on the sources of funds, mortgage risk analysis and typical policies and procedures used in financing residential and commercial properties. Prerequisite: FIN 331

    FIN 493 HONORS SEMINAR (3)

    An advanced interdisciplinary seminar that focuses on important books and issues and encourages independent thinking, clear presentation and an understanding of the concerns and methods of various disciplines. The course may be team taught; topic and instructor(s) may change from semester to semester. Course may be repeated for credit when topic changes. prerequisites: 3.3 GPA and permission of the Denit Honors Program director

    FIN 494 HONORS PROJ/THESIS (3 - 6)

    Directed individual instruction in an advanced project of the student's choice; the project must be academically related to this discipline. Each student works closely with a faculty director who guides his/her progress. The project must be of honors quality and must be finally approved by both the faculty director and a second faculty member. Course is eligible for a continuing studies grade. prerequisites: 3.3 GPA and permission of both the Denit Honors Program director and the faculty director

    FIN 495 INTERNSHIP IN FINANCE (3)

    Provides students with practical real-world experience in an organization. The course requires a minimum of 120 hours of practical work with a qualified firm based on explicit statements of student responsibilities and faculty/firm monitoring mechanism. Students will work closely with both the firm and a faculty member. prerequisites: completion of 9 hours of finance courses, with a minimum GPA of 3.0 in these courses. Completion of MGMT 330 is recommended. Permission of the department chair is required.

    FIN 497 SPEC TOPIC: (3)

    The economics and finance faculty, from time to time, offer an opportunity to integrate new material into the undergraduate program reflecting changes in the field and in the educational needs of students. Prerequisites: FIN 331.

    FIN 499 INDEPENDENT STUDY : FINANCE (1 - 3)

    An independent study under the direction of a faculty member. For ­eligibility and procedures, refer to the Merrick School of Business Independent Study Policy.

    FIN 505 ESSENTIALS OF FINANCE (1.50)

    Provides introductory-level coverage of financial management. Topics include financial statement analysis, time value of money, financial markets and interest-rate determination, security pricing and valuation, and decision tools. prerequisites: ACCT 505 and ECON 505

    FIN 605 FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT (1.50)

    Provides intermediate-level coverage of topics in financial statements and their analysis, financial forecasting, security risk and pricing, capital budgeting and nonpublic corporate finance. prerequisites: FIN 505, OPRE 505, ECON 506 or permission of the M.B.A. program director

    FIN 615 ENTREPRENEURIAL FINANCE (1.50)

    Provides intermediate-level coverage of topics in venture capital and private equity, asset allocation, security risk and pricing, decision-making and nonpublic corporate finance. prerequisite: FIN 605

    FIN 625 CORPORATE FINANCE (1.50)

    Provides advanced-level coverage of capital budgeting and intermediate-level coverage of topics in asset pricing, capital structure, dividend policy, and derivative instruments such as options and futures. prerequisite: FIN 605

    FIN 700 FINANCIAL REPORTING (3)

    Integrates U.S. generally accepted accounting principles and International Financial Reporting Standards to develop students’ understanding of financial accounting transactions, reporting standards and financial statements. Case materials and financial statements of U.S. and international companies are incorporated. Topics include standard setting, financial statement presentation issues, measurement issues (including fair-value accounting) and classification and recognition issues. prerequisites: ACCT 504 or ACCT 505 and FIN 640 or FIN 605

    FIN 704 FINANCIAL MARKETS AND INSTITUTIONS (3)

    Covers the theory and role of efficient financial markets in the general economy; the structure and regulation of the debt, equity and derivative markets; and the functional management of financial institutions, including commercial and investment banks, investment funds and regulatory agencies. prerequisite: FIN 504 or FIN 505

    FIN 705 ADVANCED FINANCIAL ANALYSIS (3)

    Designed to extend the knowledge and skills acquired in FIN 640 by applying the tools of financial analysis and decision-making at an advanced level. A variety of case applications include coverage of diagnostic financial-statement analysis and forecasting; cash-flow measurement and valuation; and management of financial policy. prerequisite: FIN 640 or FIN 605

    FIN 715 INVESTMENT ANALYSIS (3)

    Provides the theory and tools for measuring and managing the risk and return of financial instruments in the context of modern portfolio theory. A variety of stock, bond, option and other financial asset valuation techniques are presented throughout the course. prerequisite: FIN 605

    FIN 720 GLOBAL FINANCE (3)

    Emphasizes two aspects of global finance: 1) international capital market structure, interest rate and exchange rate determination; and 2) international corporate financial management of risk and return. Topics include: interest rate, purchasing power and international Fisher parities; hedging and management of international interest-rate and exchange-rate risk; and foreign exchange forecasting. prerequisite: FIN 605

    FIN 725 RISK MANAGEMENT (3)

    Provides a comprehensive overview of concepts and tools of corporate risk management, including identification and measurement of value-added, risk and managing the trade-off between the two. Topics include: value-at-risk measures; application of options and futures contracts to risk management; and managing interest rate, credit and other forms of operating risk. prerequisite: FIN 605

    FIN 735 PORTFOLIO MANAGEMENT (3)

    Builds upon FIN 715 to address the problems and opportunities of portfolio management rather than individual assets. Topics include both systematic and unsystematic risk and methodologies for making sure that this risk is appropriate for the beneficiaries of the fund. Also addressed are issues in portfolio theory, hedging, macroeconomic analysis, growth versus value stocks and alternative investments as well as staffing and investment policy documentation and compliance. prerequisite: FIN 715

    FIN 750 REAL ESTATE INVESTMENT (3)

    An advanced course in the analysis and valuation of income-producing real property. Topics include real estate cash flow analysis, internal rate of return, analysis under risk and uncertainty, appraisal techniques, alternative financing forms, market analysis and the securitization of real property and mortgages. Both theory and case analysis are employed and students will get an understanding of the value of the ARGUS real estate analysis software.

    FIN 770 NEW VENTURE FINANCING (3)

    Covers financing and entrepreneurial organization from startup to initial public offering and beyond. Topics include identification and assessment of capital needs, financial planning, sources of capital and the role of venture capital, and the capital markets in financing entrepreneurial organizations. prerequisite: FIN 640 or FIN 605

    FIN 780 BUSINESS VALUATION (3)

    Business valuation arises in mergers, acquisitions, divestitures, estate taxation, lost profits litigation, buy-out agreements, commercial lending, venture capital, IPOs and other exit strategies. This course addresses valuation modeling, using asset pricing theory and practice and employing advanced applications such as EXCEL and corporate databases. The course material is of interest to students who envision careers as CPAs, business valuation experts, corporate finance analysts and investment bankers. Prerequisite: FIN 605.

    FIN 797 SPECIAL TOPICS IN FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT (3)

    Enables the presentation of specialized topics in finance, allowing flexibility for both the changing developments in finance and the educational needs of students. Topic areas may include entrepreneurial finance, cash and liquidity. Exact topics and prerequisites are posted in the University schedule of classes. May be repeated for credit as topics vary. prerequisite: FIN 640 or FIN 605

    FIN 799 INDIVIDUAL RESEARCH (1 - 3)

    Individual research in an area of interest to the student. The expectation is that work equivalent to a regular graduate course will be completed. Formal paper(s) will be written under the supervision of a full-time faculty member. prerequisites: approval of finance instructor, department chair and academic adviser

  • INSS: Information Science/Systems

    INSS 100 COMPUTER INFORMATION SYSTEMS (3)

    This course provides an introduction to the fundamental technologies that underpin modern organizations, as well as those that affect people's personal lives. The course will provide students with the essential knowledge needed to function productively and independently with information technology. Skills learned will include the ability to solve problems using software, to adapt to new technological environments, and to keep information organized and communicate effectively using technology. Topics will include exploring basic programming concepts through robotics, an introduction to data analysis using spreadsheets, an introduction to cyber security, privacy and ethics, and using databases. Students successfully completing this course will have met the UB graduation requirement for technology fluency. [TF]

    INSS 209 INTRODUCTION TO PROGRAMMING (3)

    This course develops logical and analytical thinking through basic programming concepts like looping, simple sequence, decision and branching. It also provides an exposure to algorithm development for the design of simple programs. Topics include basic concepts of data and file organization.

    INSS 225 STRUCTURAL PROGRAMMING USING PROCEDURAL LANGUAGES (3)

    This course introduces good coding practices using structured programming concepts. Modules and shared routines with single-entry and single-exit points are emphasized. Sequence, selection, repetition, and nesting, techniques are reinforced as acceptable means of controlling program logic. Students work on projects that involve analyzing, designing, coding, executing and testing programs. Pre-requisite: INSS 209 or permission of instructor .

    INSS 300 MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEMS (3)

    Provides a fundamental knowledge of information systems and technology (IS&T) issues from the perspective of business professionals. This ¬includes information technology concepts and vocabulary as well as insights into IS&T applications in business organizations. Topics include searching and extracting information to solve business problems; the role of organizational context in IS&T effectiveness; the economic, social, legal and ethical impacts of IS&T; the systems life cycle approach; and key technologies such as the Internet, networking and database management systems. This course satisfies the University’s information literacy requirement in addition to the computer literacy general-education requirement. [COSC] [CTE] [ELECGE] [IL] [TF]

    INSS 315 INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY (3)

    Information technology stressing the ­personal computer (PC) as a critically important tool in today’s business ­environment. An advanced foundation in information technology enabling students to support personal computer users in selecting, acquiring, customizing, optimizing, maintaining and upgrading their PC hardware and system software. Topics include: characteristics of CPUs, input/output devices; motherboards and ­expansion cards; operating systems and graphical user interface; memory management; system performance benchmarks and techniques; hardware and software technical selection; hardware and software upgrading and installation, and setup of system software. Students are introduced to local area and wide area network technologies. Ethical and legal issues related to computers, especially to PCs, are presented. Prerequisite: INSS 100 or INSS 300 or equivalent.

    INSS 327 PROGRAM DESIGN AND DATA STRUCTURE (3)

    This objective of this course is on developing object-oriented programming skills. This includes abstract data type construction, data and file structure. It includes developing objects for IS applications using data structures including indexed files. instructor.Prerequisite: INSS 225 or equivalent or permission of instructor

    INSS 370 PROJECT MANAGEMENT (3)

    This course provides the fundamentals of project management, with a focus on managing information systems projects. Upon successful completion of this course, candidates may be eligible to take the Project Management Institute (PMI) exam for Certified Associate in Project Management (CAPM). Prerequisites: INSS 300 or permission of instructor

    INSS 401 INTERNET AND BUSINESS (3)

    Provides an understanding of the Internet and the information superhighway through hands-on experience with the main Internet services and applications. The course also answers the questions about how to use the Internet for communications; search for free information, files, and programs; and create a presence on the Internet for individuals and businesses using hypermedia and the Web. Prerequisite: INSS 300 / Merrick School of Business student or permission of instructor

    INSS 406 SYSTEM ANALYSIS AND LOGICAL DESIGN (3)

    Introduces key principles and techniques used to develop or modify information systems to support business ¬undertakings. The course covers the lifecycle of software systems, with an emphasis on the analysis and logical design phases. Topics include the determination and modeling of the requirements of information systems and software, business process modeling and reengineering, data modeling, data gathering and requirements specification, interface design, and the development of system prototypes, including electronic forms and reports. Students gain experience with leading industry development tools such as those from Oracle and PeopleSoft. prerequisite: INSS 209 or INSS 225 or equivalent/ Merrick School of Business student or permission of the instructor.

    INSS 421 DESIGN OF DATABASE MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS (3)

    Introduces the concepts and technologies relevant to the design, development, and implementation of database systems. Data modeling concepts and principles of database design are used to illustrate the construction of integrated databases. Database management systems (DBMS) and their purpose, advantages, disadvantages, and application in business are covered. Prerequisite: INSS 300/ Merrick School of Business student or ­permission of the instructor.

    INSS 422 BUSINESS INTELLIGENCE (3)

    Business Intelligence (BI) refers to the use of information technology to analyze complex information about an organization and its competitors for use in business planning and decision making. This course details the components of BI systems, important techniques as well as the critical variables needed to implement an effective BI program. The course takes a managerial approach to Business Intelligence, emphasizing BI applications and implementations. The course will involve use of industry standard software packages. Prerequisite: MATH 115 and INSS 421, or permission of instructor/ Merrick School of Business student

    INSS 427 BUSINESS DATA COMMUNICATIONS (3)

    Provides students with a basic understanding of terminology, techniques, and concepts of business data communications. The emphasis is on both the technical aspects of data communication and related managerial issues. Topics include, but are not limited to, physical aspects of data communication, common carrier services, local area networks, wide area networks, Internet and electronic commerce, network management, and ­network applications. Prerequisite: INSS 300 / Merrick School of Business student or by permission of the instructor

    INSS 431 ELECTRONIC COMMERCE (3)

    This course provides both a managerial and technical perspective on e-commerce applications, with an emphasis on the operational, tactical, and strategic applications of e-commerce, and the major technologies involved in their development. The course will cover the different types of e-commerce., the technologies and techniques involved, and the major issues facing organizations conducting electronic commerce. Managerial topics include mobile commerce; business, consumer, and government ecommerce uses; and legal, ethical and regulatory issues. Technical topics explored include network infrastructure, ecommerce security, and technologies for data transformation and exchange such as XML. Prerequisite: INSS 300/ Merrick School of Business student or permission of the instructor.

    INSS 452 WEB SERVER MANAGEMENT AND CGI PROGRAMMING (3)

    Provides students with intermediate skills in ­developing interactive, server-based, applications using the world wide web common gateway interface (CGI) and includes the installation and management of web server software, e.g., Apache and other freeware web server software. PERL and CGI programming, Visual Basic, C, or C++ may be used as an alternative CGI programming language. Prerequisites: INSS 401 and INSS 225, or 327, or permission of the instructor.

    INSS 453 INTERNET AND NETWORK SECURITY (3)

    Familiarizes students with basic security threats on networks connected to the Internet and basic tools to provide user and system security resources available on the Internet. The main focus is on digital and infrastructure security. Topics include security framework overview; footprinting; scanning; enumeration; hacking framework; backdoor servers and Trojans; root-kits; Windows (98/NT, 2000/XP) and Linux vulnerabilities; dialup, VPN and network devices vulnerabilities; firewalls; Intrusion Detection System (IDS); Denial of Service (DoS) and Ddos; buffer overflow; spyware; phishing; social engineering and protecting the Web end-user. This is a project-oriented course using a restricted-access UB lab to practice the use of hacking and security tools.prerequisites: INSS 315 and INSS 427 or permission of the instructor / Merrick School of Business student

    INSS 454 OPERATING SYSTEMS (3)

    Functions of operating systems, including process management and concurrency, memory management, scheduling, and user and file management security are studied, as are hardware features required by modern operating systems. Course content also includes a study of symmetric multiprocessing, clusters’ hardware and operating systems concepts, and the capabilities of several commercial operating systems. Provides hands-on experience in a specialized laboratory that includes PC, workstation, and mini- and mainframe computer operating systems, including system setup and basic system administration functions. prerequisite: INSS 225 or INSS 327 or permission of the instructor

    INSS 460 COMPONENT ORIENTED PROGRAMMING (3)

    The current real –world software development environment is characterized by complex, sophisticated frameworks of interdependent tools, functionalities, and languages. Architectures such as J2EE and .NET facilitate the design and development of component-based, distributed, reusable software code for business applications. The purpose of this course is to provide an overview of the concepts, principles, and practices of component-oriented applications development, and to foster hands-on skills using one or more architectures. Topics include software design, development, assembly, and deployment issues, comparison with object-oriented approaches, component standards and libraries, and interoperability concerns. Prerequisite: INSS 225 or equivalent or permission of the instructor.

    INSS 470 IT SERVICE DELIVERY (3)

    As businesses become more dependent on technology, it is crucial that a company's IT systems are designed and delivered to consistently support its business processes. One increasingly popular way to achieve this, particularly as applications hosted and managed "in the cloud" become more pervasive, is to take a service management approach. This course presents the fundamentals of IT service management, including service management strategies, the service lifecycle, metrics and performance indicators, and the impact a service management approach has on issues such as data management, virtualization certification exam. prerequisites: INSS 370 or permission of instructorand security. The course material will prepare students for the ITILV3 Foundation INSS 370 or permission of instructor / Merrick School of Business students or by permission of the instructor.

    INSS 490 MIS CAPSTONE PROJECT (3)

    Student teams undertake an MIS project in a public- or private-sector organization. Projects emphasize the integration of concepts and skills developed in prior courses. Projects typically include elements of analysis and design as well as database, telecommunications or management of information systems. prerequisites: Permission of instructor/ Merrick School of Business students

    INSS 493 HONORS SEMINAR (3)

    An advanced interdisciplinary seminar that focuses on important books and issues and encourages independent thinking, clear presentation and an understanding of the concerns and methods of various disciplines. The course may be team taught; topic and instructor(s) may change from semester to semester. Course may be repeated for credit when topic changes. prerequisites: 3.3 GPA and permission of the Denit Honors Program director

    INSS 494 HONORS PROJ (3 - 6)

    Directed individual instruction in an advanced project of the student's choice; the project must be academically related to this discipline. Each student works closely with a faculty director who guides his/her progress. The project must be of honors quality and must be finally approved by both the faculty director and a second faculty member. Course is eligible for a continuing studies grade. prerequisites: 3.3 GPA and permission of both the Denit Honors Program director and the faculty director

    INSS 495 INTERNSHIP IN MIS (3)

    Provides students with practical real-world experience in an organization. The course requires a minimum of 120 hours of practical work with a qualified firm based on explicit statements of student responsibilities and faculty/firm monitoring mechanism. Students will work closely with both the firm and a faculty member. prerequisites: completion of 15 hours of INSS courses (excluding INSS 300) with a minimum GPA in those courses of 3.0 and permission of the instructor

    INSS 497 SPEC TOPIC: (3)

    The INSS faculty, from time to time, offer an opportunity to integrate new material into the undergraduate program reflecting changes in the field and in the educational needs of students. prerequisites appear in each semester’s class schedule. Prerequisite: Merrick School of Business student and by permission of the instructor.

    INSS 499 INDEPENDENT STUDY - INFORMATION SYSTEMS (1 - 3)

    An ­independent study completed under the direction of a faculty member. For eligibility and procedures, refer to the Merrick School of Business Independent Study Policy.Prerequisite: Merrick School of Business student and by permission of the instructor.

    INSS 605 IT FOR BUSINESS TRANSFORMATION (3)

    Examines the key roles that information systems and technologies play in the current business environment as well as the disruptive and innovative nature of information systems in promoting the fundamental transformation of industries, businesses and society. Covers current major issues in the field of management of information systems, such as social computing, cybersecurity, big data and mobile technologies. Prerequisites: graduate standing.

    INSS 611 Data Science Toolkit I (3)

    This course will introduce the basis of using the python programming language in data science, specifically to collect and manipulate data in preparation for exploratory data analysis and prediction. No prior programming experience is required. Topics will include python data structures, program logic and libraries, as well as data wrangling and data management. Types of data sources covered will include databases as well as unstructured data sources such as social media feeds.

    INSS 612 Data Science Toolkit II (3)

    The effectiveness of business analytics depends on the quality of the data fed into the analytics models used. Data scientists can spend as much as 60% of their time cleaning and organizing data. This course focuses on preparing data for analytics tasks, to improve the accuracy and reliability of the results. Using python students will learn to "wrangle" (clean, transform, merge and reshape) data. Techniques will include data parsing, data correction, and data standardization.

    INSS 621 Digital Transformation (1.50)

    Digital technologies are playing a transformative role in the modern world. The changes associated with digital innovations such as social media, block-chain technology and smart embedded devices are rapidly disrupting a variety of industries across the globe and challenging institutions, organizational structures, and most importantly, the skillset needed for a successful workforce. This course focuses on bleeding-edge technologies and digital business transformation. It enables students to understand the challenges and opportunities of the dynamic complex and disruptive technological business environment of the digital age.

    INSS 622 Digital Innovation (1.50)

    The digital revolution is constantly challenging businesses and managers to adapt to new realities. Many organizations are establishing market leadership in today's competitive environment by mastering digital innovation. This course is designed to assist students in understanding that the fundamental nature of digital innovation is not about information technology, but is about thinking differently about how to organize to create value. It aims to equip students to competently identify technological and organizational opportunities, lead digital initiatives and develop new business models for existing and emerging organizations. Topics include digital disruption and innovation, digital platforms, digital business models and digital product and service development.

    INSS 641 LEADERSHIP OF THE IT FUNCTION (3)

    Focuses on the role of the chief information officer. Today’s CIO proactively assesses and balances the organization’s technological and business environment in a partnership with the CEO. Topics include structure of the IT function, planning and measuring IT-business alignment, enterprise architecture, systems integration, applications portfolio, project planning and management, systems development and implementation, change management, insourcing, outsourcing, vendor management, operations and control management, IT human resource management and legal and ethical issues. Various facets of the CIO’s role are explored through published case studies of real organizations. Background readings are assigned as preparatory work for class-based case discussions. prerequisite: INSS 640 or INSS 605

    INSS 650 NETWORKING AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS (3)

    Provides a solid understanding of fundamentals as well as state-of-the-art networks and telecommunications used in business. Topics include communications layers and architectures, physical and data link layer, network and transport layer, local area networks (LANs), local intranets, wireless LANs, backbone networks, virtual LANs, collapsed backbones, telephone service, voice-over IP, wide area networks, packet-switching concepts, frame relay, ATM, VPN, Internet infrastructure (NAPs, MAEs and backbone), network management and infrastructure security. This course focuses on the TCP/IP architecture, but the OSI model is presented and discussed. It also covers Microsoft Windows networking TCP/IP concepts, including architecture, fixed and dynamic IP addresses, subnet mask calculation, NetBIOS Resolution, IP routing and resolution, and DHCP and DNS services. prerequisite: INSS 605

    INSS 651 DATABASE MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS (3)

    Examines the theories and concepts employed in database management systems (DBMS) and the efficiencies and economics of such systems. The course specifically addresses steps in the database cycle, including normalization, database design, implementation and developing queries using SQL. The functions of various types of DBMS are described, including their purpose, advantages, disadvantages and applications in business. Data administration, data requirements for ERP systems and data security issues are also covered. prerequisite: INSS 640 or INSS 605

    INSS 671 SYSTEMS ANALYSIS AND DESIGN (3)

    Introduces students to key principles and techniques used to develop or modify information systems to support business undertakings. The emphasis is on the determination and modeling of the requirements of information systems and software. Topics include business process re-engineering and the modeling of business processes; data modeling; data gathering and requirements specification; interface design; and the development of systems prototypes, including electronic forms and reports. Students will gain experience with leading industry development tools such as those from Oracle and Peoplesoft. prerequisites: computer literacy and word processing, spreadsheet and database competencies

    INSS 701 INTERNET DEVELOPMENT FOR BUSINESS (3)

    Covers the issues involved with managing an organization’s website. Issues include content management, scalability, security, reliability and usability. Topics include tools and techniques for developing and managing large-scale websites, such as Dreamweaver, ColdFusion and XML. prerequisites: computer, browser and network literacy

    INSS 703 PRINCIPLES OF INFORMATION SECURITY MANAGEMENT (3)

    Awareness and management of information security has become critical to the management of any organization. This course focuses on the need for businesses to adapt to the changing security landscape, and provides an introduction to the different domain areas in information security from a managerial perspective. Topics will include security governance, legal regulations and compliance, environmental security, operations security, access controls, network security, disaster recovery response, and cryptography.

    INSS 722 Visual Business Intelligence (3)

    This course will introduce students to the use of data visualization and visual business intelligence in a business environment. Students will develop a framework and language for analyzing and critiquing the visualization of data, and learn to use data visualizations to effective support decision making. Topics will include data abstraction and validation, and how to handle different types of data, dataset and attribute types. Students will use software tools to create visualizations.

    INSS 737 STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT OF INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY (3)

    Covers information systems strategy and management from a top management perspective. Information technology is an integral part of most products and services of the post-industrial society of the 21st century and has changed the top management job. Topics include business models and organization forms in the information age, IT as a business enabler, IT and competitive strategy, information for management control, analysis and redesign of business structure and processes, knowledge management and information networks, interorganizational networks, sourcing strategies, interfacing with the IT function, reliability and security, and ethical and policy issues. The course relies extensively on the case method, and students supplement their analyses with current information obtained from the Web or directly from the firms under study in the cases. prerequisite: INSS 640 or INSS 605

    INSS 738 ADVANCED DATABASE SYSTEMS (3)

    Examines current trends and major issues in databases, including data warehousing; data mining; data quality; data stewardship; Web-based systems; and object-oriented, distributed and enterprise-wide systems. This course uses software systems like ORACLE and PeopleSoft to demonstrate some of these concepts. prerequisite: INSS 651

    INSS 739 SYSTEMS ARCHITECTURE (3)

    Covers the process and techniques used in the design and implementation of information systems. Emphasis is on systems architecture and on the integration of new systems into an existing infrastructure. Topics include types of system architecture, large-scale system design, including middleware and software components, database design and integration. prerequisite: INSS 671

    INSS 740 INTRODUCTION TO SECURITY MANAGEMENT (3)

    An overview of principles and issues in business and organizational security management. Students examine the challenges embodied in various aspects of security mentioned above. Planning for loss prevention and the protection of assets is examined. Students use situational analyses, case studies and other research-oriented approaches. prerequisite: INSS 640 or INSS 605

    INSS 742 DATA MINING FOR STRATEGIC ADVANTAGE (3)

    An overview of data mining and how these techniques can be used to predict behavior patterns. Emphasizes both theoretical and practical understanding related to pattern recognitions, trends, predictions, categorization and exploration used in data mining. Security, ethical and legal issues related to data mining are examined. Applications of data mining tools in business security, marketing and government are presented. Students use situational analyses, case studies and other research-oriented approaches. prerequisites: OPRE 504 and INSS 640

    INSS 751 OPERATING SYSTEMS (3)

    Provides a solid understanding of modern operating systems (OS) concepts and trends—distributed computing, parallel architecture and open systems. Topics include kernel, process and threads, concurrency and deadlock, scheduling, memory management, storage area network (SAN), network attached storage (NAT), disk performance, redundant array of independent disks (RAID), file systems, symmetric multiprocessing (SMP), clusters, middleware, distributed processing and client/server and OS security. Covers Microsoft Windows and Linux basic concepts including overview at both the graphical user-interface and command-prompt levels, basic tools to manage applications and processes, devices, services, users, drives and partitions, virtual memory (swapfiles), networking and security. This is a project-oriented course, offering hands-on experience in both Windows and Linux. prerequisite: INSS 640 or INSS 605

    INSS 752 WEB SERVER MANAGEMENT AND CGI PROGRAMMING (3)

    Provides an understanding of Web server installation, setup and management (particularly Apache and IIS); developing interactive, server-based applications with the Web Common Gateway Interface (CGI), Active Server Pages (ASP) or PHP; and applications manipulating databases on the Web (particularly MySQL). Topics include HTML and forms review, Apache and IIS Web Server, CGI specifications, Practical Extraction and Report Language (Perl) scripts syntax, commands and CGI libraries, creating and porting CGI scripts, installation and use of MySQL database server, Perl DBI and MySQL, integrating Apache and MySQL, ASP and PHP concepts. prerequisites: INSS 651 and INSS 701

    INSS 753 INFORMATION SECURITY AND BUSINESS CONTINUITY (3)

    This course focuses on information security at a strategic level, particularly information security governance and risk management, and business continuity. The key issues associated with protecting business information assets will be examined, including how risk and security assessments should be done in terms of impact on systems, staff, reputation and market share. Topics will include information security management, disaster recovery response, governance and compliance frameworks, and information security policy.

    INSS 765 e-COMMERCE TECHNOLOGIES AND APPLICATIONS (3)

    Provides a managerial and technical perspective on e-commerce applications. Emphasis is on the operational, tactical and strategic applications of e-commerce and the major technologies involved in their development. Covers the different types of e-commerce, the technologies and techniques involved and the major issues facing organizations conducting electronic commerce. Managerial topics include mobile commerce; business, consumer and government e-commerce uses; and legal and regulatory issues. Technical topics include network infrastructure, e-commerce security and data representation, and transformation and exchange technologies such as XML. prerequisite: INSS 605 or INSS 640 or equivalent

    INSS 784 PROJECT MANAGEMENT (3)

    Strong project management is key to a successful IT project. This course examines the principal elements in effective project management as well as tools and techniques for managing the process. Topics include stakeholder analysis, project design and organization, estimating and budgeting, scheduling, identifying and managing risk, project communications and project metrics, and control. prerequisite: INSS 640 or INSS 605

    INSS 792 ADVANCED TOPICS IN DATABASE MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS (3)

    Examines current and emerging trends, technologies and practices in database management systems. Topics may include but are not limited to data warehousing, data mining, distributed database systems, knowledge discovery tools and database design for customer relations management. prerequisite: INSS 738 or permission of the instructor

    INSS 797 ADVANCED TOPICS IN INFORMATION SYSTEMS (1 - 3)

    An exploration of advanced topics in information systems of interest to faculty and students. Topics are selected and printed in the schedule of classes. Pre-requisite: INSS 605 or INSS 640

    INSS 799 INDIVIDUAL .RESEARCH : INFORMATION SYSTEMS (1 - 3)

    Prerequisites: approval of information systems instructor, department chair and academic adviser

  • IMTC: Innovation Mgmt/Tech Commerce

    IMTC 601 BUSINESS FUNDAMENTALS FOR ENTREPRENEURS AND INNOVATORS I (3)

    Designed to be one of the first two courses in business for M.S. in Innovation Management and Technology Commercialization candidates from non-business backgrounds. Topics covered focus on aspects of business and management studies relevant to new venture creation and innovation. These include small-team formation and leadership, creativity, marketing new products and services and other relevant topics. prerequisite: admission to the M.S. in Innovation Management and Technology Commercialization program or permission of instructor

    IMTC 602 BUSINESS FUNDAMENTALS FOR ENTREPRENEURS AND INNOVATORS II (3)

    Designed to be one of the first two courses in business for M.S. in Innovation Management and Technology Commercialization candidates from nonbusiness backgrounds. Topics covered focus on aspects of business and management studies relevant to new venture creation and innovation. These include accounting and finance topics such as accounting for intangibles, valuation, finance, sources of finance and other relevant topics. prerequisite: admission to the M.S. in Innovation Management and Technology Commercialization program or permission of instructor

    IMTC 750 INTRO TO INNOVATION MANAGMENT AND TECHNOLOGY COMMERCIALIZATION (3)

    Designed to be the survey course for the M.S. in Innovation Management and Technology Commercialization program. Topics covered include the innovation process, creativity, research and development, technology transfer and new product development. prerequisite: IMTC 601 or permission of instructor

    IMTC 761 PATENTS, TRADEMARKS AND TECHNOLOGY (3)

    Introduces students to three important areas of intellectual property law: trade secrets, patents, and trademarks. Together, these bodies of law protect the technology, image, and brand for products, processes, and services. The course addresses the policies underlying the protection of intellectual property and compares the different ways intellectual property can be used to protect commercial interests, particularly in rapidly changing technological areas like computers and the Internet. This course is intended for students who want an introduction to intellectual property. prerequisite: IMTC 750 or permission of instructor

    IMTC 790 MANAGING THE GROWING TECHNOLOGY FIRM (3)

    This course addresses the principal business-related issues facing senior- and middle-level managers in growing technology-oriented firms. Topics covered include marketing, strategy, human resources management and managerial accounting as each relates to this organizational setting. prerequisite: IMTC 750 or permission of instructor

    IMTC 791 RESOURCE ACQUISITION FOR TECHNOLOGY VENTURES (3)

    Addresses the processes by which technology ventures acquire resources to implement strategies. Topics covered include bootstrapping, angel financing, venture capital, strategic alliances, corporate venturing, licensing and government financing of technology ventures. prerequisite: IMTC 602 or permission of instructor

    IMTC 792 INNOVATION IN DEVELOPING AND EMERGING ECONOMICS (3)

    Addresses the distinctive innovation practices in developing and emerging economies. Topics covered include frugal production, reverse innovation, and bottom-of-the-pyramid strategies. prerequisite: IMTC 750 or permission of instructor

  • MGMT: Management

    MGMT 101 BUSINESS IN A CHANGING WORLD (3)

    Business in a Changing World (3) An introduction to the world of business. Students explore the role of business in society, the dynamics of business and public policy, business ethics and social responsibility, the implications of global competition on society, forms of business organizations, and managing to enhance service, quality and productivity. This course also introduces students to the various functional areas and possible careers in business including the creation and distribution of goods and services, accounting and finance, marketing and human resource management. [SOSC] [GIK] [SBS]

    MGMT 301 MANAGEMENT AND ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR (3)

    An exploration into the functions of management, management history, individual behavior, interpersonal relationships in organizations, the nature of work, values and ethics, motivation and morale, teamwork, communication and group dynamics, leadership and supervision, and organizational structure and culture. Course coverage includes global perspectives and significant research from the behaviorial sciences. prerequisite: WRIT 300

    MGMT 302 GLOBAL BUSINESS ENVIRONMENT (3)

    This course enhances students' abilities to operate successfully in today's multicultural, global environment. Students will gain a theoretical basis for understanding key aspects of the global business environment, as applied to small companies, multinational corporations, multilateral institutions and non-governmental organizations. Students will explore the impacts of globalization at home and abroad. Course modules aim to broaden the students' understanding of similarities and differences among national political economics, legal systems and sociocultural environments, including world religions, business ethics and social responsiblity. Students will survey business functions as they are applied to expand and manage international operations. [GD]

    MGMT 315 HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT (3)

    An exploration of competence areas necessary for effectively dealing with people in the workplace. Emphasis is placed on practical application of knowledge gained in the areas of human resource planning, job analysis, selection, training, compensation and safety/health administration. An overview of labor-management relations is provided. Course ¬coverage includes diversity, ethics, communication and international considerations. prerequisite: CMAT 201 or CMAT 303

    MGMT 330 PERSONAL AND PROFESSIONAL SKILLS FOR BUSINESS (1)

    Provides students with the skills necessary to advance their career development. Strategies and practices that allow the student to successfully interface with potential employers are explored and applied. Course modules include business etiquette and professional behavior, appropriate use of workplace communication techniques, written business communications, and showcasing career-building talents and skills within an organizational context. There is a lab fee associated with this course.

    MGMT 339 PROCESS AND OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT (3)

    Provides an overview of managing critical resources efficiently and effectively to create physical goods, services and information goods in manufacturing and service organizations. Topics include operations strategy, project management, forecasting, location and layout of facilities, capacity and process planning, upstream and downstream supply chains and the role of the Internet, operations and environment, matching supply and demand, scheduling, job design and quality management. Integrated throughout are considerations of ethics, information systems, people involved and the domestic and international environment. prerequisite: MATH 115

    MGMT 400 HUMAN RESOURCE ANALYSIS AND COMMUNICATIONS (3)

    An exploration of data analysis and presentation skills for human resource decision-making. Research skills and computer technology are applied to planning, selection, compensation, survey data, organizational effectiveness and utilization analysis. Special emphasis is placed on oral, written and electronic communication skills. prerequisite: MGMT 315 and OPRE 202 / Merrick School of Business student or by permission of the instructor.

    MGMT 410 EMPLOYMENT RELATIONS LAW (3)

    An in-depth discussion of employment law as it applies to recruitment, selection and promotion decisions as well as management’s responsibility to comply with the many federal laws pertaining to employer-employee relations. prerequisites: MGMT 315 / Merrick School of Business student or by permission of the instructor.

    MGMT 415 COMPENSATION AND PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT (3)

    A study of the objectives, procedures and problems ¬involved in the establishment and administration of operative and executive compensation plans. Detailed examinations of job descriptions and evaluations, wage and salary structures, performance ratings, ¬incentive systems, related legislation and occupational information are conducted. prerequisite: MGMT 315 / Merrick School of Business or by permission of the instructor

    MGMT 419 SEMINAR IN HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT (3)

    An in-depth analysis of current challenges to human resource managers in small to multinational organizations. Cases and simulations are integral aspects of the learning experience. prerequisite: MGMT 315

    MGMT 425 EMPLOYEE AND LABOR RELATIONS (3)

    An analysis of the history and development of the American labor movement. Emphasis is placed on labor legislation and present practices in contract negotiations, analysis and administration. An overview of international labor issues is provided. Prerequisite: MGMT 315 / Merrick School of Business student or by permission of the instructor.

    MGMT 430 QUALITY AND PROUCTIVITY MANAGEMENT (3)

    A study of all aspects of quality in creating goods and services; the relationships among customers, employees, suppliers and other stakeholders; the impact of quality on organizational productivity; measures of output performance; and benchmarking. prerequisite: MGMT 339 / Merrick School of Business student or by permission of the instructor

    MGMT 440 MANUFACTURING OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT (3)

    A detailed study of topics related to the design and operation of manufacturing systems. Topics include zero inventory, group technology, flexible manufacturing, synchronous production and Grundlichkeit. Interactions with other fields of management such as marketing and finance are discussed. Manufacturing issues related to capacity and demand, productivity and quality, flexibility and ¬efficiency are also addressed. Prerequisite: MGMT 339 / Merrick School of Business student or by permission of the instructor.

    MGMT 445 SERVICE OPERATIONS (3)

    A detailed study of various topics in effective and efficient management of service operations in both public- and private-sector organizations. Topics include understanding the unique features of services, service strategy, the interface between marketing and operations in service management, design of service operations, service quality management, customer satisfaction and retention, managing customer contact, service capacity management and location choice. Case studies supplement lectures and readings. Prerequisite: Merrick School of Business student or permission of the instructor

    MGMT 465 INTERNATIONAL MANAGEMENT (3)

    An intensive introduction to the practice of business in the international setting, as well as the ­various cross-cultural factors to be found around the world. Prerequisites: MGMT 302/ Merrick School of Business student or permission of the instructor.

    MGMT 475 STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT (3)

    This capstone course utilizes the case method to study processes, strategy, change and policy issues arising at the general management level. This course must be taken in the final semester. Prerequisites: all business upper-division core courses / Merrick School of Business student or permission of the instructor.

    MGMT 493 HONORS SEMINAR (3)

    An advanced interdisciplinary seminar that focuses on important books and issues and encourages independent thinking, clear presentation and an understanding of the concerns and methods of various disciplines. The course may be team taught; topic and instructor(s) may change from semester to semester. Course may be repeated for credit when topic changes. prerequisites: 3.5 GPA and permission of both the Denit Honors Program director

    MGMT 494 HONORS PROJ/THESIS (3 - 6)

    Directed individual instruction in an advanced project of the student's choice; the project must be academically related to this discipline. Each student works closely with a faculty director who guides his/her progress. The project must be of honors quality and must be finally approved by both the faculty director and a second faculty member. Course is eligible for a continuing studies grade. prerequisites: 3.3 GPA and permission of both the Denit Honors Program director and the faculty director

    MGMT 495 INTERNSHIP IN MANAGEMENT (3)

    Provides students with practical real-world experience in an organization. The course requires a minimum of 120 hours of practical work with a qualified firm based on explicit statements of student responsibilities and a faculty/firm monitoring mechanism. Students will work closely with both the firm and a faculty member. prerequisites: completion of 9 hours of management courses, with a minimum GPA of 3.0. Completion of MGMT 330 is recommended. Permission of the department chair is required.

    MGMT 496 INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS PRACTICUM (3)

    Students have the opportunity to work closely with a company engaged in international business. The course requires a substantial work assignment consistent with expectations for a 3-credit course in the Merrick School. The faculty member will approve a statement of student responsibilities and design a monitoring mechanism prior to beginning the work. Prerequisite: department consent required / Merrick School of Business student.

    MGMT 497 SPECIAL TOPICS: (3)

    An intensive exploration of topics in the area of management. Refer to the current Class Schedule for topic offered. Prerequisites: Determined by instructor, Merrick School of Business student.

    MGMT 498 GLOBAL FIELD STUDY (3)

    To better understand and succeed in global business today, there is no better way than direct experience through immersing oneself in a foreign environment. This course will provide an opportunity for lectures and discussion with local experts and students regarding key themes of economic, political and cultural importance to business. The course will engage students in field visits to companies, government agencies and other organizations located abroad. Prerequisite: department consent required.

    MGMT 499 INDEPENDENT STUDY: MANAGEMENT (1 - 3)

    An independent study under the direction of a faculty member. For eligibility and procedures, refer to the Merrick School of Business Independent Study Policy. Prerequisite: Merrick School of Business student and permission of the instructor

    MGMT 605 LEADING WITH INTEGRITY (1.50)

    Focuses on leadership, integrity and core management principles. Provides an overview of concepts and practices essential to managerial effectiveness, including developing a vision for the organization in a complex business environment, setting objectives, planning, motivating others, managing for results, and a grounding in ethics at the individual and organizational level. prerequisite: graduate standing

    MGMT 615 MANAGING IN A DYNAMIC ENVIRONMENT (3)

    Covers the processes and necessary skills for leading and managing people in organizations that compete in dynamic environments. Emphasizes leading and motivating diverse employee populations in global organizations, and human resource management issues, including evaluation, rewards, and employment law. prerequisite: MGMT 605 or MGMT 600

    MGMT 625 COLLABORATION, NEGOTIATION AND CONFLICT MANAGEMENT (3)

    Addresses negotiation skills and the capacity to effectively resolve conflicts. Students apply theory and research to the practice of negotiation and conflict management through practical, hands-on experience including simple buyer-seller bargaining; labor-management negotiations; impasse resolution; and complex, multiparty, multiissue negotiations. prerequisite: MGMT 605 or MGMT 600

    MGMT 650 RESEARCH FOR STRATEGIC HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT DECISIONS (3)

    Covers methods and tools used in business research. Topics include locating sources of strategic human resource management information, developing a research project, using the computer to process data and organizing and presenting strategic human resource management reports. prerequisite: OPRE 504 or OPRE 505 and OPRE 506 or equivalent

    MGMT 710 HUMAN RESOURCE AND COMPENSATION MANAGEMENT (3)

    Covers human resource management issues including legal considerations, recruiting, selection, performance appraisal, development and health and safety. Also covers strategic compensation issues, including job evaluation, benefits administration and pay determination strategies. Additional emphasis on workforce diversity, international dimensions and ethical consideration. Prerequisite: MGMT 600 or MGMT 605

    MGMT 712 EMPLOYMENT LAW AND THE HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGER (3)

    Covers employment law as it applies to management decisions in recruitment and promotion as well as in terms of management’s responsibility to comply with federal laws. Topics include legal issues in employment law and the legal consequences of noncompliance, the regulatory model of government control over the employment relationship, equal employment opportunity, safety and health regulations, the Americans with Disabilities Act, pay and benefits law, the Employee Retirement Income Security Act, civil rights of employees (privacy and wrongful discharge), the Family Leave Act, international comparisons and emerging regulatory issues. prerequisite: MGMT 600 or MGMT 605

    MGMT 725 LABOR RELATIONS AND CONFLICT MANAGEMENT (3)

    Focuses on the legal foundations of labor-management relations and the collective bargaining process. Also covers the basic principles of contract negotiation, administration, impasse resolution, comparative labor relations in cross-cultural contexts, and conflict management strategies applied to workplace settings for groups and individuals. prerequisite: MGMT 600 or MGMT 605

    MGMT 730 LEADERSHIP, LEARNING AND CHANGE (3)

    Based on the idea that the deeper we go into the exploration of organizational leadership, learning and change, the more we need to deal with the dimensions of the sense-making, connection-building, choice-making, vision-inspiring, reality-creating roles of leaders. The course involves a series of workshops designed to help students learn something that cannot be taught: leading, learning and changing “from within.” Readings, assignments and Web forum interactions are designed to inspire “practices of deep inflection”: storytelling, historical inquiry, reflective reading and writing, dialogue and action research.

    MGMT 731 LEADERSHIP SEMINAR (3)

    Focuses on the critical issues pertaining to success in operating at the executive level in business and other organizations. Topics include vision, values clarification, knowing the customer, communications for internal motivation and public awareness, ethical responsibilities, decision-making, resource decisions, performance maximization, human asset activities and individual leader behaviors for effectiveness. Prerequisite: Graduate Standing

    MGMT 732 LEADERSHIP: SELF-ORGANIZATION IN THE FIRM (3)

    Covers self-organizing systems, complexity theory in management, dialogue as a management tool, leadership in a complex system, pursuing a personal discovery process and growing new knowledge and innovation. A major objective is to discover the management principles and processes that promote and foster self-organization as an alternative to command-and-control hierarchies. Also draws on the profound implications of self-organization for growing new knowledge and innovation. A second major objective has to do with the process of personal discovery. Parallel principles of spontaneous order operate at the level of the organization and at the level of the individual. As a result, a highly leveraged form of change in an organization is leadership through personal growth and discovery.

    MGMT 741 SPORT IN THE GLOBAL MARKETPLACE (3)

    Offers an interdisciplinary examination of the global flows of sporting capital. It challenges students to consider the social, cultural, technological and economic structures that constitute and are constituted by the expanding international sports industry. Using theories from a number of disciplines, students consider issues related to sport commerce in the global marketplace, including market saturation, just-in-time manufacturing of sporting goods, global sport branding, labor conditions in developing nations, sport in core and periphery economies, international sport regulation, post-industrial sporting economies, sport in the global popular, sport labor migration, sport and the culturalization of economics, global Fordism and the challenges facing the global business of sport. prerequisite: completion of all 500-level fundamental courses

    MGMT 742 SOCIAL AND ETHICAL ISSUES IN SPORT (3)

    An exploration of the incontrovertible link among sport, commerce and culture. Understanding sport forms as cultural and intertwined with business is accomplished through the sociological and philosophical analysis of several sport-related topics. Topics include sport as a mediated spectacle; factors such as race, gender and class; the negotiation of sporting spaces; and human rights. Knowledge of these social and ethical issues is discussed in terms of its practical application to the sport industry setting. prerequisite: completion of all 500-level fundamental courses

    MGMT 745 MANAGING THE SUSTAINABLE ENTERPRISE (3)

    Sustainability is a modem business concept that focuses on development of win-win-win business strategies that respect people, profit and the planet (the “triple bottom line”). This course incorporates the history of capital, business and environmentalism and the triple-bottom-line concept. It enables managers to incorporate sustainability into every phase of the business process and develop appreciation for the competitive implications of a sustainable business strategy.

    MGMT 757 E-COMMERCE AND SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT (3)

    Provides an overview of e-commerce and supply chain management. Covers in detail the role of e-commerce in the design, integration and management of supply chains; topics include logistics networks, business-to-business and business-to-consumer supply chains, decision-support systems for supply chain management, strategic alliances, Internet strategy, e-business models, e-markets (including auctions and exchanges), Internet retailing, dynamic pricing, distribution networks, Internet-based integration of value chains, the role of the Internet infrastructure (banks, utilities and so forth), decision technologies, information goods, the status of brands in the Internet economy, mass customization and various technologies related to e-business. Also covers sustainability; topics include environment and operations management, the design of sustainable products and closed-loop supply chains.

    MGMT 760 ORGANIZATIONAL CREATIVITY AND INNOVATION (3)

    Focuses on strategy and techniques for successfully leading intrapreneurship and innovation in organizations. Covers the role of power, influence and communication in the change process; confrontation and effective intervention; creativity; and acceptance of innovation. Included are individual and group concepts and techniques of organizational development; frameworks for research and experiential exercises. prerequisite: MGMT 600 or MGMT 605

    MGMT 765 MANAGEMENT OF HEALTH CARE ORGANIZATIONS AND PROFESSIONALS (3)

    A two-module course focused on major organization and management issues in health-care service organizations and on the roles and interactions of individual health professionals and their relationships with patients and with the organization’s administration. prerequisite: MGMT 600 or MGMT 605

    MGMT 770 PLANNING, PREVENTION AND RISK MANAGEMENT (3)

    Identifies and defines critical infrastructures and their associated threats and countermeasures. Software applications containing risk-management tools are mastered and provide skills necessary for the comparison and selection of competing proposals designed to optimize infrastructure protection. Industry-specific studies are performed using these risk-management analysis techniques. Contingency and continuity of operation planning (COOP) techniques are also reviewed. Skills acquired during the course are applied to case studies of selected industrial, service and government organizations to practice critical infrastructure planning, protection and risk management. prerequisites: OPRE 505, OPRE 506 and INSS 605

    MGMT 780 LEADING ACROSS CULTURES (3)

    Focuses on leadership challenges and dilemmas of multinational and multicultural organizations within the United States and among other countries. Enhances knowledge and capabilities to more effectively identify, understand and manage the cultural components of organizational and business dynamics. Topics include cultural value awareness, cross-cultural communication skills and cross-cultural leadership skills, including strategic planning, organizational design and creating and motivating a globally competent workforce. Prerequisite: MGMT 600 or MGMT 605.

    MGMT 781 INTERNAT'L BUSINESS STRATEGY (3)

    Draws on the framework of global strategic management to help students integrate the concepts of economics, finance, marketing, technology and operations in a global context. Focuses on market entry issues, transnational structures, operational issues and leadership in cross-cultural settings and provides the framework for a real-world, international business project that may be completed by student teams and which offers the option for a study/analysis trip to another country. prerequisite: all 500-level M.B.A. courses or equivalent

    MGMT 790 STRATEGIC MANAGMENT CAPSTONE (3)

    An experiential capstone in which students assume the perspective of general managers facing decisions of strategic importance to their organizations. Emphasizes the critical functions of goal-setting, strategy formulation, implementation and control processes. prerequisites: ACCT 605, ECON 605, ENTR 605, FIN 605, INSS 605, MGMT 605, MKTG 605, OPRE 605

    MGMT 795 ENTREPRENEURSHIP PRACTICUM (3)

    Students are provided the opportunity to work with a new company or product/service division on a real-life entrepreneurship project. Students work together in consulting teams composed of teammates with varying specializations and interests. Projects may deal with market analyses, feasibility studies, distribution analyses or a variety of other specific company needs. prerequisite: department consent

    MGMT 796 GLOBAL BUSINESS PRACTICUM (3)

    Provides students with opportunities for real-world experience working with companies on international projects of real value and priority to the companies. Students choose an international study experience from the participating Merrick School of Business specializations and companies. Student consulting teams work together on a specific corporate project, focusing on a particular country or region of interest to the company. Projects may focus on market analyses, feasibility studies, distribution analyses or a variety of other specific company needs. Students register for this course as a 3-credit elective. prerequisite: department consent

    MGMT 797 SPECIAL TOPICS IN MANAGEMENT (3)

    An intensive exploration of topics in the area of management. Topics include e-commerce, e-commerce and supply chain management, e-venturing, leadership, organizational theory and best business practice. Refer to semester class schedule for title of topic offered. May be repeated for credit when the topic varies. prerequisite: to be determined by the instructor

    MGMT 798 GLOBAL FIELD STUDY (3)

    There is no better way to understand and succeed in global business today than through direct experience, or immersing oneself in a foreign environment. This course will provide an opportunity for lectures and discussion with local experts and students regarding key themes of economic, political and cultural importance to business. The course will also engage students in field visits to companies, government agencies and other organizations located abroad. prerequisite: department consent

    MGMT 799 INDIVIDUAL RESEARCH (1 - 3)

    Investigation into a particular subject in more depth than can be accommodated by an existing course. Students work closely with an individual faculty member. prerequisites: approval of management instructor, department chair and academic adviser

  • MKTG: Marketing

    MKTG 301 MARKETING MANAGEMENT (3)

    A basic course in the contribution of marketing to the firm or organization that includes decision-making tools for integrating product, price, distribution, and communication decisions and processes into an -organization competing in a global environment. Students also build skills in oral and written communication. [IL]

    MKTG 407 INTERNATIONAL MARKETING (3)

    An application of marketing concepts and tools to international marketing problems arising in a global business environment. Prerequisites: MKTG 301.

    MKTG 410 BUYER BEHAVIOR AND MARKETING ANALYSIS (3)

    One requirement of successful marketing is listening to the voice of the customer. Marketers need to know what customers want, when and why they want it. Buyer Behavior and Market Analysis will enable students to understand the basic buyer and company needs. In addition, students will be able to verify them with commonly used research techniques that really listen to the voice of the customer. Prerequisite: MKTG 301 and MATH 115

    MKTG 415 MARKETING COMMUNICATION (3)

    The course examines integrated marketing communications in the context of changes in media that have occurred since 2000. Communication theory will be the foundation of planning, implementing, evaluating and coordinating an integrated marketing communication program. There will be special emphasis on social media. Students will advance their professional competencies in written and oral communication, teamwork and critical thinking. Prerequisite: MKTG 301/ Merrick School of Business student or by permission of the instructor.

    MKTG 420 MARKETING RESEARCH (3)

    An analysis of the methods of collecting, analyzing and interpreting marketing information, and specific applications of research to problems in the marketing field. Students build critical thinking competencies in data interpretation. Prerequisites: MKTG 301 and MATH 115

    MKTG 430 PERSONAL SELLING (3)

    Presents the sales principles and skills required by today's professional salesperson, with emphasis on both the business-to-consumer and business-to-business selling environments. Examines current approaches to a variety of selling challenges including prospecting, the selling process, closing the sale and post-sale follow-up. Presents the principles underlying the sales process and the practical application of these principles to selling situations. Studies the role of selling in the total marketing process. Prerequisite: MKTG 301 / Merrick School of Business student/ or by permission of the instructor.

    MKTG 440 PRODUCT MANAGEMENT (3)

    Examines methods of creating new ideas, developing product prototypes, modifying existing products, evaluating market response, and commercializing and launching new products and services. Competitive and global changes, and technological, social, legal, economic and related issues are considered in the assessment of market potential, corporate resource needs and eventual success. Prerequisite: MKTG 301 / Merrick School of Business student or by permission of the instructor.

    MKTG 450 NEW VENTURE AND INDUSTRY ANALYSIS (3)

    The use of information and marketing models to analyze consumer and industrial markets. Students also build professional competencies in using computers to analyze marketing information used for market planning. Prerequisite: MKTG 301.

    MKTG 460 ADVANCED MARKETING MANAGEMENT (3)

    A study of the organization and management of a marketing-oriented enterprise using marketing cases and/or simulations to integrate the frameworks and skills from Marketing Management (MKTG 301) to analyze and plan marketing programs. Critical thinking, oral and written communication and teamwork competencies are advanced. Prerequisite: MKTG 301,senior status or permission of the department chair /Merrick School of Business student.

    MKTG 493 HONORS SEMINAR (3)

    An advanced interdisciplinary seminar that focuses on important books and issues and encourages independent thinking, clear presentation and an understanding of the concerns and methods of various disciplines. The course may be team taught; topic and instructor(s) may change from semester to semester. Course may be repeated for credit when topic changes. Prerequisite: 3.3 GPA and permission of the Denit Honors Program director / Merrick School of Business student.

    MKTG 494 HONORS PROJ/THESIS (3 - 6)

    Directed individual instruction in an advanced project of the student's choice; the project must be academically related to this discipline. Each student works closely with a faculty director who guides his/her progress. The project must be of honors quality and must be finally approved by both the faculty director and a second faculty member. Course is eligible for a continuing studies grade. prerequisite: 3.3 GPA and permission of both the Denit Honors Program director and the faculty director / Merrick School of Business student

    MKTG 495 INTERNSHIP IN MARKETING (3)

    Provides students with practical real-world experience in an organization. The course requires a minimum of 120 hours of practical work with a qualified firm based on explicit statements of student responsibilities and a faculty/firm monitoring mechanism. Students will work closely with both the firm and a faculty member. Prerequisites: Completion of 9 hours of marketing courses, with a minimum GPA of 3. 0. Completion of MGMT 330 is recommended. Permission of the department chair is required.

    MKTG 497 SPECIAL TOPICS IN MARKETING (3)

    The marketing faculty, from time to time, offer an opportunity to integrate new material into the undergraduate program reflecting changes in the field and in the educational needs of students. Prerequisite: MKTG 301/ Merrick School of Business student or permission of the instructor.

    MKTG 499 INDEPENDENT STUDY: MARKETING (1 - 3)

    An independent study completed under the direction of a ­faculty member. For eligibility and ­procedures, refer to the Merrick School of Business Independent Study Policy.

    MKTG 505 MARKETING ESSENTIALS (1.50)

    Covers concepts, processes and institutions necessary for effective marketing of goods and services, including analyses of market opportunities, buyer behavior, product planning, pricing, promotion and distribution. prerequisite: graduate standing

    MKTG 605 MARKETING STRATEGY (1.50)

    Explores the role of marketing in creating value for the firm and its stakeholders and examines market strategy in the context of a dynamic external environment. prerequisite: MKTG 504 or MKTG 505 or permission of the M.B.A. program director

    MKTG 615 ENTREPRENEURIAL MARKETING (1.50)

    Emphasizes market opportunity analysis, product development, creation and formulations of strategic positioning, pricing feasibility, channel strategies and promotion with limited resources in entrepreneurial and intrapreneurial settings. prerequisite: MKTG 605

    MKTG 625 CUSTOMERS AND MARKETS (1.50)

    Focuses on choosing customers and markets through data analysis, building customer loyalty and communicating to current and potential customers in B2C, B2B and nonprofit organizations. prerequisite: MKTG 605

    MKTG 742 SOCIAL, NONPROFIT AND PUBLIC SECTOR MARKETING (3)

    Centers on the application of social marketing principles, frameworks and tools within nonprofit and public-sector organizations to improve performance and foster the successful dissemination of social initiatives to individuals, foundations and corporations. Recognizing that this sector represents many differences in missions, structures and resources, this course emphasizes that effective social marketing requires a change from being organization-centered to becoming audience-centered. prerequisite: MKTG 605

    MKTG 745 STRATEGIC SPORT MARKETING (3)

    Compares and contrasts the field of sport marketing with the practices and applications of mainstream marketing. Includes an overview of the foundations of sport marketing and examines the application of these principles to collegiate and professional sport organizations, special events, facilities, commercial and public organizations, sponsors and corporations, sporting goods manufacturers and the sport enterprise in general. Combines lecture, assigned readings, case studies, research assignments and special projects to strategically assess the current state of sport marketing. prerequisite: MKTG 605 or MKTG 640

    MKTG 755 INTEGRATED MARKETING COMMUNICATIONS (3)

    Analyzes integrated marketing communications (IMC) management and the role it plays in organizations’ marketing plans. Focuses on strategic, synergistic planning to effectively use promotional tools to help the firm achieve their promotion objectives. These tools include advertising, direct marketing, online marketing, sales promotion, personal selling, public relations, buzz marketing, trade shows, etc. Regulation, ethics, social responsibility and economic factors that affect an IMC program will also be examined, as will consideration of the international environment, special decision areas and how the IMC mix may change as a firm goes global. prerequisite: MKTG 605 or MKTG 640

    MKTG 760 GLOBAL MARKETING MANAGEMENT (3)

    The theory and application of marketing in a global context. Topics include international trade and financial markets; market structures of nations; and consumption behavior related to culture, social values and economic conditions. Also considers the political and legal control over marketing activities (advertising, promotion and distribution), the growth of regional marketing arrangements relative to competitive strategies of multinational corporations, the dilemma of marketing ethics in a multicultural world and the cost-benefit of technology transfer. prerequisite: MKTG 605 or MKTG 640

    MKTG 762 MARKET OPPORTUNITY ANALYSIS (3)

    Introduces the subject of opportunity analysis in marketing, intrapreneurship and entrepreneurship as well as the practice of their requisite skills. Includes the analysis of markets, competition, preliminary cost feasibility and intellectual property and also involves the creation and development of strategic positioning appropriate to the marketing opportunity. prerequisite: MKTG 605 or permission of the instructor.

    MKTG 770 PRODUCT AND BRAND DEVELOPMENT AND MANAGEMENT (3)

    Focuses on the firm’s product and brand development and management strategies with a special emphasis on innovative offerings. The influence of the social, legal and technological environment, as well as relationships with users and channel members, on the implementation of product and brand strategies are analyzed and discussed in depth. Encourages the application of the learned concepts to tangible and intangible products such as goods, services and ideas. prerequisite: MKTG 605 or MKTG 640

    MKTG 780 MARKET INFORMATION AND RESEARCH (3)

    Focuses on the acquisition, evaluation and use of competitor and consumer information for goods and services. Explores a variety of methods, including the use of electronic data such as the Internet, computer databases and scanner data as well as behavioral research (e.g., focus groups, observations, survey research and experiments). Emphasis on the timeliness and validity of information in making effective marketplace decisions regarding competitor and consumer behavior. prerequisite: MKTG 605 or MKTG 640

    MKTG 796 MARKETING PRACTICUM (3)

    Student teams apply concepts from other courses and from their experience to solve marketing problems. They are provided the opportunity to work with an organization or with a product/service division of same on a real-life marketing project. Students work together in consulting teams composed of teammates with varying interests, backgrounds and academic specializations. Projects may deal with a variety of marketing strategies, including customer and competitive analysis, feasibility studies, product and service development, promotion, pricing, distribution, analyses and a variety of other specific organization or company needs. prerequisite: department consent

    MKTG 797 SPECIAL TOPICS: (3)

    Explores specialized topics in marketing, allowing flexibility for both the changing developments in applied business practice and the educational needs of students. Exact topical coverage and prerequisites are listed in the schedule of classes. prerequisite: MKTG 605 or MKTG 640

    MKTG 799 INDEPENDENT STUDY (1 - 3)

    Prerequisites: Approval of marketing instructor, department chair and academic adviser. MKTG 605

  • OPM: Operations Management

    OPM 505 INTRODUCTION TO OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT (1.50)

    Overview of the concepts and tools used for the creation and delivery of goods and services. Describes the role of effective operations management for organizational success and competitiveness. Demonstrates approaches for improving quality, productivity, customer service and overall performance. prerequisite: graduate standing

    OPM 615 INNOVATION AND PROJECT MANAGEMENT (3)

    Covers the essentials of innovation and project management from project selection through implementation, monitoring, control and termination. Topics covered include: product/process innovation, project identification, risk and uncertainty in project management, project planning and budgeting, selecting the project team, resource allocation, implementation and control, and project evaluation and termination. prerequisite: OPM 505 or MGMT 506

    OPM 625 OPERATIONS AND SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT (3)

    Provides in-depth coverage of the concepts, techniques and tools used to design, create, control and improve manufacturing and services operations. Topics covered include: operations strategy, quality management, high- and low-contact services, forecasting, smart pricing, procurement, global supply chains, sustainability in manufacturing and services, aggregate sales and operations planning, inventory control and operations scheduling. prerequisite: OPM 505 or MGMT 506

  • OPRE: Operations Research

    OPRE 202 STATISTICAL DATA ANALYSIS (3)

    A second course in the statistical analysis of data related to business activities with emphasis on applications in various functional areas including accounting, finance, management, marketing and operations management, among others. Topics include estimation, hypothesis testing, contingency tables and chi-square test, analysis of variance and covariance, simple and multiple regression analysis and correlation analysis. Computer implementation using Excel-based statistical data analysis or other relevant software and interpretation of results for business applications are emphasized. prerequisites: OPRE 201 and basic computer skills.

    OPRE 315 BUSINESS APPLICATION OF DECISION SCIENCE (3)

    A study of managerial decision-making processes using a ¬decision-sciences approach. Topics include linear and integer models and decision analysis and their application in investment problems, media selection, market research, product mix, production planning, personnel scheduling and transportation design, among others. Special emphasis is on understanding the concepts and computer implementation and interpreting the results to write management reports. prerequisite: MATH 111 and Math 115

    OPRE 493 HONORS SEMINAR (3)

    An advanced interdisciplinary seminar that focuses on important books and issues and encourages independent thinking, clear presentation and an understanding of the concerns and methods of various disciplines. The course may be team taught; topic and instructor(s) may change from semester to semester. Course may be repeated for credit when topic changes. prerequisites: 3.3 GPA and permission of the Denit Honors Program director

    OPRE 494 HONORS PROJ/THESIS (3)

    Directed individual instruction in an advanced project of the student's choice; the project must be academically related to this discipline. Each student works closely with a faculty director who guides his/her progress. The project must be of honors quality and must be finally approved by both the faculty director and a second faculty member. Course is eligible for a continuing studies grade. prerequisites: 3.3 GPA and permission of both the Denit Honors Program director and the faculty director

    OPRE 497 SPECIAL TOPICS IN OPERATIONS RESEARCH (3)

    An intensive exploration of topics in the area of operations research. Refer to the semester class schedule for exact title of topic offered. This course may be repeated for credit when topic changes. prerequisites: determined by the instructor

    OPRE 499 INDEPENDENT STUDY: OPERATIONS RESEARCH (1 - 3)

    An ­independent study under the direction of a faculty member. For eligibility and procedures, refer to the Merrick School of Business Independent Study Policy.

    OPRE 505 FUNDAMENTALS OF STATISTICS (1.50)

    Emphasizes applications of descriptive statistics in business. Topics include basic probability concepts, summary measures of location and dispersion, discrete and continuous probability distributions, sampling distribution of mean, and introductions to confidence interval estimation and hypothesis testing. Excel-based software is used for computer implementation. prerequisite: graduate standing

    OPRE 506 MANAGERIAL STATISTICS (1.50)

    Emphasizes applications of inferential statistics in business. Topics include confidence interval estimation, hypothesis testing, analysis of variance, simple linear regression and an introduction to multiple regression. Excel-based software is used for computer implementation. prerequisite: OPRE 505

    OPRE 605 BUSINESS ANALYTICS (1.50)

    Explores business analytics and its applications to management decision-making for a range of business situations. Covers problem structuring; big data; data mining; optimization; computer simulation; decision analysis; and predictive modeling. prerequisite: OPRE 504 or OPRE 505 and OPRE 506 or equivalent or permission of the M.B.A. program director.

    OPRE 797 SPECIAL TOPICS IN OPERATIONS RESEARCH (3)

    Explores advanced topics in operations research of interest to faculty and students. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisites and topics are selected and printed in the schedule of classes. prerequisite: department consent

    OPRE 799 INDIVIDUAL RESEARCH: OPERATIONS RESEARCH (1 - 6)

    Individual research in an area of interest to the student. The expectation is that work equivalent to a regular graduate course will be completed. Formal paper(s) will be written under the supervision of a full-time faculty member. prerequisites: approval of information systems instructor, department chair and academic adviser

  • REED: Real Estate/Economic Developmt

    REED 312 REAL ESTATE PRINCIPLES AND TRANSACTION (3)

    Identifies the framework in which the acquisition and development of real estate are arranged. Particular attention is paid to financing techniques and the underlying financial structures involved in real estate investment choices. Emphasis is placed on development issues including site acquisition and evaluation, environmental regulation, market analysis and interaction with constituent groups.

    REED 315 REAL PROPERTY LAW (3)

    Focuses on how law impacts real estate, its ownership, conveyance and development. Emphasis is on real property ownership interests, restrictions on such interests, methods of transferring such interests, private and public land use controls, and legal transactions involving real estate, such as gifts, sales and leases. prerequisite: BULA 151 or equivalent

    REED 475 REAL ESTATE MARKET ANALYSIS (3)

    Emphasizes real estate markets with specific attention given to understanding the market forces affecting real estate at the urban and regional levels. The main focus is on providing insight into the operation of urban land and nonresidential markets and the process of urban growth and regional development. Prerequisites: REED 312 / Merrick School of Business student or by permission of the instructor.

    REED 480 PROPERTY MANAGEMENT (3)

    This course addresses the issues involved with managing commercial property including residential, office, retail and industrial. Topics include tenant relations and retention, insurance and risk management, leasing, environmental issues, and maintenance. Prerequisite: REED 312

    REED 495 INTERNSHIP IN REAL ESTATE AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT (3)

    Provides students with practical real world experience in an organization. The course requires a minimum of 120 hours of practical work with a qualified firm based on explicit statements of student responsibilities and faculty/firm monitoring mechanism. Students will work closely with both the firm and a faculty member. Prerequisite: completion of 9 hours of real estate courses, with a minimum GPA of 3.0. Completion of MGMT 330 is recommended. Permission of the department chair is required..

    REED 497 SPECIAL TOPICS IN REAL ESTATE (3)

    The real estate faculty, from time to time, offer an opportunity to integrate new material into the undergraduate program reflecting changes in the field and in the educational needs of students. Prerequisite ECON 312

  • UNIV: Sophomore Seminar

    UNIV 203 SOPHOMORE SEMINAR: INTELLECTUAL TRANSITIONS (3)

    (Reserved for MSB students ) Serves as a bridge from the first year to a student's major area of study, building on skills gained in First-Year Seminar: Introduction to University Learning, learning communities and other general-education courses. All sophomores participate in a common academic experience designed to enhance their critical-thinking and to enable them to make connections among their academic work, personal aspirations and professional goals. Students engage a common reading across seminar sections, exploring academic discourse in broad areas, and apply core skills in communication, research, information literacy and team building to real-world issues. prerequisite: WRIT 101; prerequisite or corequisite: INFO 110 (may be waived for students who enroll with 45 credits or more). [CTE]

  • TAXA: Taxation

    TAXA 650 TAX RESEARCH AND WRITING (3)

    Covers research and writing projects on federal tax subjects with analysis and instruction in tax research techniques, materials and methodology. Students are required to prepare legal memoranda.

    TAXA 651 FUNDAMENTALS OF FEDERAL INCOME TAX I (3)

    Covers basic concepts in federal income taxation, including gross income, exclusions, adjusted gross income, deductions, exemptions, credits, assignment of income, identification of the taxpayer, tax rates, depreciation and the alternative minimum tax.

    TAXA 652 CORPORATE TAXATION (3)

    Covers federal income taxation of corporations and their shareholders with emphasis on the formation of the corporation, capital structure, operational alternatives, distributions, partial and complete liquidations, personal holding companies and the accumulated earnings tax. Formation, operation and liquidation of S corporations discussed briefly.

    TAXA 653 PARTNERSHIP TAXATION (3)

    Explores problems encountered in the formation, operation and liquidation of a partnership, including the acquisition of partnership interests, compensation of the service partner, the treatment of partnership distributions and problems associated with the disposition of partnership interests or property by sale.

    TAXA 654 TAX PRACTICE & PROCEDURE (3)

    Covers aspects of practice before the Internal Revenue Service, including ruling requests, handling of audits, assessment of deficiencies and penalties, closing agreements, tax liens, statutes of limitations, claims for refunds, appeals conferences and practice before the U.S. Tax Court, U.S. District Courts, Claims Court and appellate courts. Also includes analysis of the problems encountered in parallel civil and criminal proceedings, problems involving government investigatory powers and taxpayer rights and privileges.

    TAXA 655 TAX POLICY (3)

    A study of the evolution and structure of the federal income tax system from a public-policy perspective with a focus on legal, economic, social and practical considerations. Alternatives, including current legislative proposals, are considered. Students prepare a paper on a tax policy issue approved by the professor.

    TAXA 660 ESTATE AND GIFT TAXATION (3)

    Covers the basic principles of federal estate and gift taxation, including computation of the taxable estate, inter vivos transfers, transfers in contemplation of death, transfers with retained interests or powers, joint interests, life insurance proceeds, property subject to powers of appointment, the marital deduction and the unified credit.

    TAXA 662 FOREIGN TAXATION (3)

    Analysis of the federal income tax provisions applying to U.S. inbound and outbound transactions and investments. Course covers U.S. resident status, source-of-income rules, graduated tax on effectively connected income, withholding tax on FDAP income, branch profits tax, FIRPTA, tax treaties, foreign tax credit, foreign earned income exclusion, Subpart F and transfer pricing.

    TAXA 663 QUALIFIED PENSION AND PROFIT-SHARING PLANS (3)

    An introduction to pension and profit-sharing law with particular emphasis on Title 2 (IRS) of ERISA. Geared toward understanding all of the pension and profit-sharing rules that must be met for plan qualification, with emphasis on qualified plan planning for both incorporated and unincorporated forms of business.

    TAXA 664 EXECUTIVE COMPENSATION (2)

    Covers methods of providing tax-free and tax-deferred compensation to employees, including section 83 tax planning, stock option tax planning, incentive compensation arrangements and methods of funding nonqualified plans.

    TAXA 665 TAX EXEMPT ORGANIZATIONS (2)

    An analysis of provisions relating to the qualification for exemption from federal income tax, with emphasis on section 501(c)(3) organizations, private foundations and the treatment of unrelated business income.

    TAXA 667 ESTATE PLANNING (972) (3)

    Examines methods of disposing of estates by will, life insurance, inter vivos arrangements and the consideration of resulting tax and administrative problems. Also focuses on gathering and analyzing facts in the planning and drafting of trusts, wills and related documents. additional prerequisite: TAXA 660

    TAXA 668 BUSINESS PLANNING WORKSHOP (3)

    An integrated study of the impact of tax, securities, corporate law and partnership law on business transactions. Topics include selection of the form of business enterprise, acquisitions and dispositions of business interests, and professional responsibility issues. Students prepare writing projects relating to the course material. additional prerequisites: TAXA 652 and TAXA 653

    TAXA 670 INCOME TAXATION OF ESTATES AND TRUSTS (3)

    Covers federal income taxation of decedents’ estates, simple and complex trusts, charitable trusts and grantor trusts. Also covers the preparation of fiduciary income tax returns with emphasis on unique tax issues such as income in respect of a decedent, distributable net income and fiduciary accounting.

    TAXA 671 CORPORATE REORGANIZATIONS (3)

    An analysis of the tax treatment of corporations and shareholders in corporate acquisitions, divisions, reincorporations and recapitalizations, including a discussion of section 338. Review of the net operating loss carryover and collapsible corporation rules. additional prerequisite: TAXA 652

    TAXA 672 STATE AND LOCAL TAXATION (3)

    Explores federal constitutional and statutory limitations on state authority to tax a multistate business. Specific topics include the Commerce Clause, sales and use tax nexus and PL 86-272 limitations on state income taxation. Also covers apportionment of income derived from a multistate business and combined versus separate entity reporting. Maryland state and local taxation also are examined briefly.

    TAXA 674 CONSOLIDATED CORPORATIONS (2)

    An analysis of the techniques used by multiple, related corporations to report income and losses. Detailed examination of the consolidated income tax regulations and consideration of other problems encountered by affiliated groups of corporations. additional prerequisite: TAXA 652

    TAXA 675 ADVANCED REAL ESTATE TAXATION (2)

    An analysis of the effect of income taxes on real estate transactions; a comparison of the various entities used for the ownership and development of real estate; real estate syndications, basis and basis adjustments; alternative financing techniques such as the sale-leaseback; depreciation, amortization and obsolescence; passive activity and at-risk rules; and REITS. additional prerequisite: TAXA 678

    TAXA 676 FEDERAL TAX LEGISLATION WORKSHOP (3)

    A workshop course that examines the process of formulating and enacting federal tax legislation, as well as areas ripe for current federal tax legislative proposals; these areas may include income tax rates, capital gains taxation, tax expenditures, and the federal estate tax. Students will engage in drafting and other exercises that simulate the process of creating such legislation from the standpoint of staffers on Congressional committees. Prerequisite: Fundamental Federal Income Tax I

    TAXA 678 FUNDAMENTALS OF FEDERAL INCOME TAX II (3)

    A continuation of basic tax concepts, including cash and accrual methods, capital gains and losses, 1231 transactions, recapture, original issue discount and imputed interest, below-market loans, installment sales, like-kind exchanges, involuntary conversions, at-risk rules and passive loss rules.

    TAXA 679 WELFARE BENEFIT PLANS (2)

    Welfare benefit plans are employee-sponsored plans that provide employees with benefits other than pension and retirement plans and deferred compensation. Welfare benefit plans include life insurance, health insurance, disability insurance, vacation pay, severance pay, educational reimbursement, group legal services and dependent assistance care plans. This course focuses on federal income tax requirements for various welfare benefit plans, including fringe benefits and health-care continuation coverage under COBRA. Examines the income tax consequences to employers who sponsor, and employees who participate in, welfare plan benefits. Discusses the various mechanisms for offering welfare benefit plans, such as cafeteria plans under section 125 and VEBAs under section 501(c)(9).

    TAXA 680 ADVANCED QUALIFIED PENSION AND PROFIT-SHARING PLANS (3)

    Building on the foundation provided by Qualified Pension and Profit-Sharing Plans, this in-depth examination of defined contribution and defined benefit plans includes current IRS positions; final, proposed and temporary regulations; and developing case law. Tax sheltered annuities are considered. additional prerequisite: TAXA 663

    TAXA 682 BANKRUPTCY TAXATION (2)

    An introduction to the basics of bankruptcy law and creditors’ rights and an analysis of tax issues that arise.

    TAXA 684 S-CORPORATIONS (1)

    Covers federal income taxation of S corporations and their shareholders with emphasis on the creation of the S corporation, capital structure, operational alternatives, distributions and liquidations.

    TAXA 689 ADVANCED PARTNERSHIP TAXATION (3)

    This course builds upon the ideas presented in Partnership Taxation and provides students with additional skills that are valuable when practicing in the area of partnership taxation. Requires an ability and willingness to engage in critical thinking and problem-solving. Topics covered include the issues surrounding family limited partnerships; transferring property into and out of a partnership on a tax-deferred basis; recognizing transactions considered tax shelters or “abuses of subchapter K” under the current climate; and the international tax concepts. additional prerequisite: TAXA 653

    TAXA 690 STATE TAX POLICY ISSUES SEMINAR (2)

    This advanced state and local tax seminar consists of discussions of articles written by leading state tax theoreticians and practitioners regarding the present condition and likely future of state taxation in the 21th century. Each student will be expected to moderate at least one group discussion during the semester. The grade will be based on class participation and the completion of one publishable paper on a state tax policy topic of the student's choice, subject to the instructor's approval.

    TAXA 692 INTRODUCTION TO THE TAXATION OF FINANCIAL PRODUCTS (2)

    Study of the taxation of basic financial building blocks (equity, debt, options, notional principal contracts and forward contracts) and their various combinations. Financial equivalencies among traditional and derivative instruments that are taxed under widely varying tax regimes. Use of financial instruments to change the timing, character and source of income. Gaps in existing law, possible future tax regimes and emerging financial products.

    TAXA 799 INDEPENDENT STUDY (1 - 2)

    Students may study an area of particular interest to them, not covered in a significant way elsewhere in the program, via an independent study. To qualify, students must submit a written proposal and obtain the consent of a faculty member who supervises the project. The proposal must be approved by both the supervising faculty member and the program director.