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CNCM Course Descriptions

 View the schedule of classes to determine course offerings by semester.

  • CNCM 101 American Conflict Since 1890 (3)

    Reflecting on major political events, social conflicts and wars over the past century, this course provides an overview of American approaches to social conflict, conflict management and peacemaking and how these events and processes propelled the United States forward nationally and internationally. [SOSC]

  • CNCM 102 Global Conflict (3)

    Students explore the causes, costs, dynamics and potential remedies to violent and structural conflict in the international system. The course addresses these issues from a broad range of social science vantage points, including the fields of international relations, sociology, anthropology, economics, law and conflict management. Experiential learning includes student simulations of international conflict negotiations. [SOSC]

  • CNCM 297 Special Topics in Negotiations and Conflict Management (3)

    Exploration of topics in negotiations and conflict management. Content varies depending upon the interests of faculty and students. Course may be repeated when topic changes.

  • CNCM 340 Community Conflict: Causes, Sources, Solutions (3)

    Understanding and addressing conflict is critical to community success. This course examines the nature of social conflict from interpersonal to community‐wide. Students consider sources of conflict; ways in which conflicts develop, escalate and de‐escalate; conflict styles, strategies and tactics; and options for managing conflict. This course also has an experiential component that allows students to develop their own conflict management skills.

  • CNCM 497 Special Topics in Conflict Management (3)

    Topics cover a broad overview of the conflict‐management field. Their primary emphasis is the study of conflict and its management, from conflict behaviors to conflict‐intervention techniques. Students read about and discuss social conflict in a number of settings ranging from interpersonal to international conflict. Course may be repeated for credit when topic changes.