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The mission of the University of Baltimore General Education Program is to engage undergraduate students in the development of essential skills and competencies that will enable them to make knowledge work.
Courses and experiential learning opportunities within this program prepare students:
  • to communicate effectively in many different modes
  • to gather, synthesize, and critically evaluate information
  • to make ethical and evidence-based decisions within real-world contexts
  • to understand systems and to think systemicall
  • to negotiate divergent and competing perspectives.
Spanning the lower division and upper division and featuring high impact educational practices, the program offers all UB students an integrative experience that transcends individual majors and helps fulfill University-wide learning goals.

General Education Area Definitions and Student Learning Outcomes

Approved by University Faculty Senate May 25, 2016

  • Arts & Humanities [AH]

    Area Definition: Arts & Humanities courses consider what it means to be human and cultivate empathy with peoples across cultures and time. Courses in this area encourage the critical investigation of value systems, and apply aesthetic frameworks to a variety of intellectual and artistic issues. Students produce work in multiple genres, and study texts from disciplines including literature, philosophy, history, art history, design, and the performing arts.

    Student Learning Outcomes:
    Students who satisfy this requirement will demonstrate that they are able to do all of the following:

    • Using appropriate concepts and vocabulary, describe how a text, performance, work of art, or other artifact leads the audience to achieve insight(s) into the human condition.
    • Explain how historical, intellectual, or cultural context influences the creation or interpretation of texts, artworks, or artifacts.
  • Arts & Humanities - Ethics [AHE]

    Area Definition: Ethics courses require students to explore and critically examine moral and ethical issues as they arise in their personal, professional and public lives. Students will gain an understanding of major moral frameworks, how they inform ethical decision-making, and their distinctive importance in the human experience.

    Student Learning Outcomes: 
    Students who satisfy this requirement will demonstrate that they are able to meet all of the following: 

    • Identify moral and ethical issues as distinct from legal, social, economic and practical issues. 
    • Using appropriate concepts and vocabulary, provide reasoning and support for a moral and ethical conclusion.
    • Using appropriate concepts and vocabulary, describe how a text, performance, work of art, or other artifact leads the audience to achieve insight(s) into the human condition.
    • Explain how historical, intellectual, or cultural context influences the creation or interpretation of texts, artworks, or artifacts.
  • Mathematics [MATH]

    Area Definition: Students will apply mathematical and scientific methods in problem-solving. Coursework in this area will build upon the content standards, essential skills, and knowledge statements developed for mathematics in the Maryland College and Career-Ready Standards to engage students in using technology, modeling, and oral and written communication to express fundamental and more advanced concepts, theories, and issues within their fields of study.

    Student Learning Outcomes:
    Students who satisfy this requirement will demonstrate that they are able to do all of the following:

    • Apply arithmetical, algebraic, geometric, measurement, statistical or technological methods to solve problems. 
    • Describe connections between mathematics and other disciplines.
  • English Composition [COMP] [UCOMP]

    At UB, these requirements are met wit WRIT101 and WRIT300

    Area Definition: Composition courses promote the value of writing as a tool for learning, thinking, and communicating. In a portfolio-based environment, students develop the rhetorical tools necessary to compose effective documents in academic, professional, and civic discourse.

    Student Learning Outcomes[COMP]in WRIT101:
    Students who satisfy this requirement will demonstrate that they are able to do all of the following:

    • Apply effective writing strategies to produce revised, polished documents. 
    • Interpret written documents, including their own, based on audience, purpose, context, and genre. 
    • Employ appropriate format, structure, and style conventions.

    Upper Division Writing SLOs[UCOMP]in WRIT300:
    Students who satisfy this requirement will demonstrate that they are able to meet the English Composition SLOs and all of the following:

    • Produce a variety of texts for multiple purposes and audiences. 
    • Engage in recursive reading, writing, and research processes to participate in the meaning-making of their field. 
  • Social & Behavioral Sciences [SBS]

    Area Definition: Social and behavioral sciences courses examine the ways in which individuals, groups, institutions, or segments of societies behave, function, and influence one another. They introduce students to the variety of methods to collect, analyze, interpret, and apply qualitative and quantitative data as related to social phenomena and individual behavior.

    Student Learning Outcomes:
    Students who satisfy this requirement will demonstrate that they are able to do all of the following:

    • Interpret events or actions of individuals, cultures, society or the institutions within which they interact using concepts of social/behavioral science by applying major concepts, theories, or models within the field of study. 
    • Describe social or behavioral science-based methods to identify solutions to problems faced by members of our communities.
  • Biological & Physical Sciences [BPS]

    Area Definition: Biological and physical sciences courses examine living systems and the physical universe. They introduce students to the variety of methods used to collect, interpret, and apply scientific data, and to an understanding of the relationship between scientific theory and application.

    Student Learning Outcomes:
    Students who satisfy this requirement will demonstrate that they are able to do all of the following:

    • Access specific scientific information on a topic related to course material. 
    • Discriminate among sources of information through the use of peer reviewed and non-refereed literature or through the discernment of scientific and non-scientific material. 
    • Demonstrate comprehension of the quantitative aspects of science and of hypothesis construction and testing through observation and evaluation of data.
  • Biological & Physical Sciences - Lab [BPSL]

    Area Definition: Biological and physical sciences courses examine living systems and the physical universe. They introduce students to the variety of methods used to collect, interpret, and apply scientific data, and to an understanding of the relationship between scientific theory and application.

    Student Learning Outcomes:
    Students who satisfy this requirement will demonstrate that they are able to do all of the following:

    • Use technology to gather and process data.
    • Access specific scientific information on a topic related to course material. 
    • Discriminate among sources of information through the use of peer reviewed and non-refereed literature or through the discernment of scientific and non-scientific material. 
    • Demonstrate comprehension of the quantitative aspects of science and of hypothesis construction and testing through observation and evaluation of data.

Graduation Requirements Area Definitions, Student Learning Outcomes and Course Requirements

Approved by University Faculty Senate January 3, 2017

  • Information Literacy

    Area Definition: Students will learn the set of integrated abilities encompassing the reflective discovery of information, the understanding of how information is produced and valued, and the use of information in creating new knowledge and participating ethically in personal and professional environments.  

    Student Learning Outcomes:
    Students who satisfy this requirement will demonstrate that they are able to do all of the following:

    • Use a discipline-specific research tool, mechanism, or strategy to address an information need.
    • Apply discipline-specific evaluation criteria to an information source.

    Course Requirements:

    Note:  The following are the minimum required course elements needed to satisfy the information literacy graduation requirement. More than the minimum is encouraged if this can be accommodated by the instructor(s). 

    Includes Area Definition and GR SLOs on course syllabus.

    Includes assignments that produce written artifacts demonstrating these SLOs.

    Details assessment criteria for each SLO.

    Uses class time or specific time on task to model and address information literacy concepts, and to have students practice evaluating sources and using/selecting research tools.

    Includes a required research journal, research log, research narrative, or similar assignment in which students document their searches and reflect on the search process and selection of material. 

  • Oral Communication

    Area Definition: Students will learn the craft of transmitting ideas clearly and concisely to a range of audiences. Coursework in this area will build skills in expressing ideas verbally and nonverbally; listening; communicating in one-on-one and group settings; conveying informative and persuasive messages; and making effective use of information resources and visual aids.

    Student Learning Outcomes: 
    Students who satisfy this requirement will demonstrate that they are able to meet all of the following: 

    • Deliver an effective oral presentation for which the selected topic, supporting materials, and language are appropriate to the audience and occasion. 
    • Employ appropriate rhetorical, organizational, and delivery techniques before an audience in real time.*
      * In real time will mean different things in different course delivery contexts.  In addition to face-to-face instruction, this requirement could be met in a variety of ways, including but not limited to:

      a.  Synchronous online class:  Material and speeches presented live in a Go-To-Meeting-like environment.

      b.  Hybrid asynchronous online class:  Material online; class meets for speeches in a Go-To-Meeting-like environment.

      c.  Online class:  Speeches recorded by students in front of an audience of academic peers or a professional setting with an appropriate audience and submitted.

    Course Requirements:

    Note:  The following are the minimum required course elements needed to satisfy the oral communication graduation requirement. More than the minimum is encouraged if this can be accommodated by the instructor(s). 

    Includes Area Definition and GR SLOs on course syllabus.

    Details assessment criteria for each SLO.

    Uses class time or specific time on task to address oral communication concepts including effective listening techniques.

    Requires students to complete a minimum of 2 required presentations, at least one of which is a group presentation.

    Requires students to complete self-evaluation and peer-response exercises.

    Emphasizes strategic and practical aspects of interpersonal communication, group discussion, and public speaking.

    Recommended class cap of 22 students.

  • Global Awareness and Diverse Perspectives

    Area Definition: Students will engage in assigned course work that requires identification of the components of global systems or the elements of diverse cultural perspectives that differ from their own.   

    Student Learning Outcomes:
    Students who satisfy this requirement will demonstrate that they are able to do all of the following:

    • Discuss causes of and reasons for explicit and implicit biases.
    • Describe ways that global forces and/or diversity shape people and institutions.

    Course Requirements:

    Note:  The following are the minimum required course elements needed to satisfy the global awareness and diverse perspectives graduation requirement. More than the minimum is encouraged if this can be accommodated by the instructor(s). 

    Includes Area Definition and GR SLOs on course syllabus.

    Includes assignments that produce artifacts demonstrating these SLOs.

    Details assessment criteria for each SLO.

    Uses class time or specific time on task to engage in thoughtful, respectful conversation about cultural practices different from one’s own.

    Requires students to complete a reflection activity as appropriate to the discipline.

     

  • Technological Fluency

    Area Definition: Students will discuss key components in information technology and examine its limitations and societal impacts. Students will develop general or discipline-specific strategies to identify, access, and apply relevant technologies. Courses in this area will build skills in using digital technologies to communicate, manipulate, and create artifacts such as documents, graphics, or computer programs, and apply theories for effective, ethical use of technology for personal and professional problem-solving.

    Student Learning Outcomes:
    Students who satisfy this requirement will demonstrate that they are able to do all of the following:

    • Describe key components in information technology.
    • Discuss the limitations of information technology and its societal impact.. 

    Course Requirements:

    Note:  The following are the minimum required course elements needed to satisfy the technology fluency graduation requirement. More than the minimum is encouraged if this can be accommodated by the instructor(s). 

    Includes Area Definition and GR SLOs on course syllabus.

    Includes assignments that produce written artifacts demonstrating these SLOs.

    Details assessment criteria for each SLO.

    Uses class time or specific time on task to address technology fluency concepts such as the computing eco-system, information systems, networks, programming, storage, databases, the cloud, software tools, cybersecurity, and privacy.

    Requires students to create at least one complex digital product integrating multimedia, business productive software, or other advanced software as appropriate to the discipline.

  • Capstone Experience

    From the Affirming Resolution, University Faculty Senate, May 5, 2014 Regarding Capstone Course Process

    The Capstone is an enhanced discipline-based learning experience designed to be culminating and integrative, typically taken in the last semester of the student's program of study. 

 

Graduation Requirements

Last Published 10/18/17