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CRJU Course Descriptions

  • CRJU 200 CRIMINAL JUSTICE (3)

    Examines the fundamental concepts of the criminal justice field; the history, philosophy, social development and operations of police, courts, and corrections in a democratic society; and criminal justice careers. Prerequisite: None. [SOSC] [QQT] [GIK] [SBS]

  • CRJU 220 POLICE AND SOCIETY (3)

    This course is an overview, designed to examine law enforcement service delivery at the local, state and federal levels of government. Special emphasis wil be placed upon the historical development of the law enforcement role in contemporary society and how it shapes the type of law enforcement service that can be expected in the future. Prerequisite: Not Applicable

  • CRJU 301 THE CONTEMPORARY CRIMINAL JUSTICE SYSTEM (3)

    A critical analysis of the contemporary criminal justice system. Political, economic, and societal contexts provide the framework for an examination of system-wide issues, current problems, and challenges facing the criminal justice system. Prerequisite: CRJU 200 or equivalent.

  • CRJU 302 CRIMINAL JUSTICE RESEARCH METHODS (3)

    A survey of the research methods and techniques utilized within the field of criminal justice and criminology. Topics discussed include research designs, sampling, data collection, ­quantitative versus qualitative methods, and applications to criminal justice planning and administration.

  • CRJU 304 CJ PROFESSIONAL STUDIES (3)

    Assists students with criminal justice database technologies and with writing and research skills specific to the field of criminal justice. Contains units on conducting secondary research, learning to write for the academic setting (e.g., literature reviews, empirical studies) versus the applied setting (e.g., case summaries, incident reports) and preparing for a career in criminal justice. prerequisite: passing of Upper Division Writing Placement Test prior to enrolling in CRJU 304 and course must be taken within the first 18 credits of the major. SCJ students who earn a B+ or better in WRIT 300 are exempt from taking CRJU 304. Students who are exempt will instead be required to take an additional 3 credit elective. [IL]

  • CRJU 306 CRIMINOLOGICAL PERSPECTIVES (3)

    The major paradigms, models, and theories that form the foundation of criminal justice and criminology are examined. Using current texts, journals, and reports, the course examines the range of explanations of criminal ­behavior, focusing on attempts to ­integrate ­perspectives and theories.

  • CRJU 320 POLICE ADMINISTRATION (3)

    Study of line and staff functions in police organizations. Examination of organization principles, management functions, and organizational behavior as they relate to police agencies. Emphasis upon the behavioral science approach to supervising and managing police personnel.

  • CRJU 330 CRIMINAL LAW (3)

    An examination of the general and specific parts of the substantive criminal law in the United States, its development within historical an societal contexts, and its representation in statutory and case law. Consideration is given to problems of application and interpretation of the written law.

  • CRJU 334 CRIMINAL PROCEDURES (3)

    This course is designed to present the principles and applications of procedural criminal law in the United States. Such procedural laws are supplemented by rules of evidence and decisions of the U.S. Supreme Court on key constitutional questions. Prerequisite: CRJU 200 Criminal Justice or equivalent.

  • CRJU 341 CORRECTIONAL PERSPECTIVES (3)

    Introduces students to the history, role, functions, problems, and contemporary practices of correctional facilities, including prisons, jails, and community corrections, e.g., probation and parole, and the role and difficulties of inmates and correctional officers.

  • CRJU 390 VICTIMOLOGY (3)

    An introduction to the study of crime victims. Examines the victim's role in crime, the criminal justice system's handling of victims, and victim services. Prerequisite: CRJU 301.

  • CRJU 392 THE TRAUMA OF VICTIMIZATION (3)

    Provides the foundation for understanding the trauma of victimization; examines the impact of trauma and describes the short and long term effects of trauma; and explains how past trauma can lead to ongoing problem behaviors. Develops skills and increases awareness of the necessary core competencies in trauma-informed services and administration. prerequisite: none

  • CRJU 394 MULTI-DISCIPLINARY PERSPECTIVES ON INTERPERSONAL VIOLENCE (3)

    Examines the complicated nature and dynamics of interpersonal violence. Presents a general overview of interpersonal violence, such as definitions, characteristics, and theoretical models; and various sources of data on interpersonal violence and measurement issues. Provides the historical development and evolution of the multidisciplinary response to interpersonal violence including law enforcement response, specialized courts, and treatment programs; civil actions; and the role of community and human service agencies. Current issues and innovations related to interpersonal violence are integrates throughout the course. prerequisite: none

  • CRJU 396 CONTEMPORARY ISSUES FOR VICTIMS OF CRIME (3)

    Analysis of crime and social reaction from the point of view of those who are offended, the crime victims. The course focuses on the relatively recent emphasis on how crime creates problems for those victimized by criminals and analysis of whole populations victimized by persons known to them. Analysis of contemporary issues relating to crime victimization as they have evolved based on legal, political, and social changes. prerequisite: none

  • CRJU 398 BEST PRACTICES FOR VICTIM SERVICES (3)

    Introduces the emerging field of victim services in context with the underlying legal structure of victims' rights. The system of victim services both within the criminal justice system and through other allied professions are examined. Best practices in victim assistance programs -from law enforcement through the courts and corrections systems to financial remedies, community-based advocacy, and treatment and support services -are also reviewes. prerequiste: none

  • CRJU 400 A DIALOGUE WITH A VICTIM (3)

    Provides a critical and in-depth review of some of the communication barriers criminal justice personnel will encounter when interacting with victims and witnesses in the course of an investigation. Particular attention is spent critically examining the competing narratives (e.g., individual, professional, personal, cultural) that often present when interviewing a victim/ witness, and how those narratives can impede the flow of communication and the investigative process. Strategies to reduce these obstacles are explored. Prerequisite: None

  • CRJU 404 COMPARATIVE CRIMINAL JUSTICE (3)

    Examines comparative criminal justice: how different societies around the world practice criminal justice relative to practices in the United States. Multi­disciplinary approach considers the economic, governmental, geographical, and social situations in the selected countries. Prerequisite CRJU 301 [GD]

  • CRJU 406 POLITICAL TERRORISM (3)

    An overview of the definitional and conceptual issues, types, history, causes and effects of oppositional political terrorism. The events of Sept. 11, including its major actors such as Osama bin Laden, al-Qaeda and the Taliban, are explored, including the reaction to this event by the United States and its allies over the past decade. The course then looks at the changes that have occurred since. Prerequisite: CRJU 301

  • CRJU 408 CRIME AND DELINQUENCY PREVENTION (3)

    A review of major crime and delinquency prevention strategies, including punitive, mechanical, and corrective prevention policies and programs. Selected prevention programs and policies are highlighted for in-depth evaluation. Prerequisite: CRJU 301.

  • CRJU 420 SPEC PROBS IN POLICING (3)

    Issues and problems in policing a free society. The role and ­function of the police, the effects of ­contemporary police practices, the ­exercise and control of police power. Examination of current problems and proposals for reform Prerequisite: CRJU 301

  • CRJU 430 JUVENILE JUSTICE (3)

    An examination of youthful law violation and the juvenile justice system. The ­history, law, operations and agencies of juvenile justice are analyzed as are alternative approaches to defining, preventing and responding to youthful law violation.

  • CRJU 432 CRIMINAL COURTS (3)

    An exploration of the multidisciplinary ­literature on the criminal courts in the United States, focusing on the social, political, and organizational contexts of the court, the court’s case flow, and the various actors in the court’s process. Contemporary issues are highlighted. Prerequisite: CRJU 301

  • CRJU 441 SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN CORRECTION (3)

    In-depth analysis of the issues, problems, and suggested reforms facing the contemporary role and practices of correctional facilities, including prisons, jails, and community corrections, e.g., probation and parole, and the role, functions, and difficulties of inmates and correctional officers. Prerequisite: CRJU 301 or CRJU 341

  • CRJU 442 COMMUNITY CORRECTIONS (3)

    An examination of practices and ­problems of community corrections, including but not limited to probation, parole, halfway houses, and fines. Prerequisite: CRJU 301 or CRJU 341

  • CRJU 445 THE INSIDE-OUT PRISON EXCHANGE PROGRAM (3)

    Inside-Out brings "outside" students -college undergraduates and graduates, particularly those pursuing careers in criminal justice and related fields together with "inside" students -incarcerated men and women -to study as peers behind prison walls. The semester-long course provides a trans formative experience that allows the outside students to contextualize and rethink what they have learned in the classroom, gaining insights that will help them pursue the work of creating an effective, humane, restorative criminal justice system. prerequisites: none

  • CRJU 451 MINORITIES, CRIME AND JUSTICE (3)

    An analysis of race, ethnicity and gender issues and how they impact the criminal justice system. An examination of how race, ethnicity, and gender issues revolve around questions associated with evidence of dsparity, disproportionality and discrimination within the criminal justice system.

  • CRJU 454 CRIMINAL BEHAVIOR (3)

    An examination of selected types of crime or criminal behavior patterns, such as white collar crime, violent crime, organized crime, drugs and crime, or age and crime. The topic studied appears in the Class Schedule. CRJU 454 may be repeated for credit when the topic changes. Prerequisite: CRJU 301

  • CRJU 456 DRUGS AND CRIME (3)

    An examination of various topics and issues relating drugs and crime in the United States. This course explores social, legal, medical, and political factors, as well as changes in attitudes that contribute to drug use and policy. Prominent drugs-crime issues and projections for the future are included. Prerequisite: CRJU 301 Social Justice in the Urban Community

  • CRJU 464 CRIMINAL JUSTICE ISSUES (3)

    An examination of a selected topic or issue, such as women and criminal justice, private security, cirminal justice legislation, or ethical issues. The topic studied will appear in the Schedule of Classes. CRJU 464 may be repeated for credit when the topic changes. Prerequisite: CRJU 301 Social Justice in the Urban Community

  • CRJU 485 ADVANCED CRIMINAL JUSTICE STUDIES (3)

    The senior level ­capstone experience. The focus is multi-disciplinary, and the emphasis is on the ­integration and application of theory, research methods, and statistics. The problems of data gathering and reporting, and relationships of theory, research, and practice in the field are addressed. Prerequisites: CRJU 301, 302, 304,306, and MATH 115.

  • CRJU 490 CRIMINAL JUSTICE INTERNSHIP (3)

    A practicum designed to broaden the educational experience of students through appropriate observational and work assignments with criminal justice agencies. Correlation of theoretical knowledge with practice emphasized. Prerequisite: CRJU 301, senior status, and consent of instructor. This course may be taken for a continuing studies (CS) grade.

  • CRJU 493 HONORS SEMINAR (3)

    An advanced interdisciplinary seminar that focuses on important books and issues, encourages independent thinking, clear presentation, and an understanding of the concerns and methods of various disciplines. The course may be team taught; topic and instructor(s) may change from semester to semester. Course may be repeated for credit when topic changes. Prerequisites: 3.3 GPA and permission of the Honors Director.

  • CRJU 494 HONORS PROJECT (3 - 6)

    Directed individual instruction in an advanced project of the student’s choice; the project must be academically related to this discipline. Each student works closely with a faculty director who guides his/her progress. The project must be of honors quality and must be finally approved by both the faculty director and a second faculty member. Course is eligible for a CS grade. Prerequisite: Honors standing, a 3.3 gpa. and permission of both the Honors Program Director and the faculty director.

  • CRJU 498 DIRECTED INDEPENDENT STUDIES (1 - 3)

    Designed to provide credit for a student who wants to pursue independent work under the supervision of a staff member. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. Eligible for Continuing Studies (CS) grade.

  • CRJU 499 SENIOR THESIS (3 - 6)

    No course description available.

  • CRJU 501 PROFESSIONAL SKILLS IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE (3)

    Focuses on professional skills that will prepare students for graduate-level coursework and for future employment. Includes navigating criminal justice databases, interpreting empirical research, writing in a technical style, creating an effective PowerPoint document and strengthening oral presentation skills. Relies on a combination of group and individual exercises in both traditional lecture format and hands-on workshops to address each skill set. Pass/fail grading; to earn a passing grade, students must earn a B or better in this course.

  • CRJU 600 Ethical Issue in Criminal Justice (3)

    Examines ethical and moral values and professional responsibilities and decision-making as they pertain to the criminal justice system. Recognize characteristics of an ethical system and ethical frameworks for various criminal justice organizations. Explores ethical implications of discretionary power and various policy issues. Analyzes ethical dilemmas and ethical conduct versus misconduct.

  • CRJU 601 CRIME AND POLICY DEVELOPMENT (3)

    Addresses the issue of how crime is measured in the United States and discusses why certain crimes capture the attention of lawmakers and the public more than do others. Examines why lawmakers have adopted certain responses to address crime and critically evaluates whether such strategies are effective in reducing crimes. Students research best practices within the field and are introduced to different analytical techniques to evaluate quantitative crime data. Prerequisites: None

  • CRJU 602 RESEARCH TECHNIQUES IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE (3)

    Provides knowledge of and experience with the methods used in studying social science problems. Emphasis is on research, designs and instruments and policy implications. Critical and analytical skills are developed for use in future research and proposal writing. This course is a prerequisite for CRJU 603.

  • CRJU 603 CRIMINAL JUSTICE STATISTICS (3)

    Introduces students to the relevance and importance of statistics in studying criminal justice problems. Explores different types of data, data-management techniques and different statistical methods to aid in the preparation of agency and formal research reports. Required for all criminal justice students.

  • CRJU 605 GRADUATE INTERNSHIP (3)

    Students will work 120 hours in a selected agency, institution or office within the criminal justice field, and will complete classroom work that focuses on career development and management skills. Required of all students. ( Note: Students who are currently working in the criminal justice field may be waived from this course at the discretion of the program director. Students who are waived must then complete an extra elective.) Prerequisite: Permission of program director.

  • CRJU 606 CONTEMPORARY CRIMINAL COURT ISSUES (3)

    In-depth analysis of selected current issues pertaining to criminal court systems. Focuses on the current research literature and considers the operational consequences of alternative responses to the issues discussed.

  • CRJU 610 ADMINISTRATION OF JUSTICE (3)

    Analysis of the major conceptions of justice and the ways these conceptions affect the manner in which social and legal systems are constituted. Examines theoretical perspectives with a view to understanding the relationships between various institutions and the administration of justice. Presents a comparative and historical focus on local, national and international systems of justice.

  • CRJU 611 CONTEMPORARY ISSUES IN CORRECTIONS (3)

    In-depth analysis of the contemporary structure of the correctional system in the United States. Evaluates the system's issues in managing and supervising a growing offender population. Explorers the latest research on best practice for institutional and community correctional programming.

  • CRJU 615 INSIDE-OUT PRISION EXCHANGE PROGRAM (3)

    Inside-Out brings "outside" students college undergraduates and graduates. particularly those pursuing careers in criminal justice and related fields -together with "inside" students -incarcerated men and women -to study as peers behind prison walls. The semester-long course provides a transformative experience that allows the outside students to contextualize and rethink what they have learned in the classroom, gaining insights that will help them pursue the work ofcreating an effective, humane, restorative criminal justice system.

  • CRJU 620 MANAGEMENT AND SUPERVISION IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE (3)

    Examines the foundational concepts of management and supervision as applied in criminal justice organizations. Explores organization and policy planning, budgeting, forecasting, human resources, and policy implementation. Emphasis is placed on issues relating to effective management and supervision in criminal justice. Topics covered include managing budgets and strategies on project management, supervising and managing personnel and staff development, setting clear performance goals, and building internal and external partnerships and community relationships to support the mission of an organization.

  • CRJU 626 PROFESSIONAL COMMUNICATIIONS IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE (3)

    Examines strategies and techniques used to obtain information in a variety of situations, to differentiate between interview and interrogation, to interact with diverse populations, to communicate with the media and to analyze information for consideration as evidence. Explores how the use of appropriate communications techniques and procedures leads to effective leadership, management and supervision within the criminal justice system. prerequisite: none

  • CRJU 631 CONTEMPORARY ISSUES IN POLICING (3)

    Examines the social and political contexts of policing in contemporary society and evaluates current issues law enforcement faces when dealing with crime control, prevention, and maintenance of order. Explores the latest research on the effect of police policies, programs and practices.

  • CRJU 632 POLICING SPECIAL POPULATIONS (3)

    Examines the research literature related to the special populations and groups of people that the police organization is mandated to manage based on statutory law, operating policies and procedures, and tradition and custom. Helps students understand how and why police intervene in the way that they do with some subgroups within the broader population.

  • CRJU 633 RACE/ETHNICITY AND GENDER ISSUES IN LAW ENFORCEMENT (3)

    Examines the research literature related to the impact of race/ethnicity and gender on the police organization. Examines the various ways that a suspect’s or victim’s race/ethnicity or gender creates problems and makes it difficult for the police organization to effectively meet the law enforcement needs of a particular community.

  • CRJU 635 YOUTH PROBLEMS IN SOCIETY (3)

    Discusses the role of demographics, developmental issues, family, school, peers and individual roles in youth behavior. Analyzes the major studies and theoretical foundations of juvenile delinquency and identifies and analyzes the current solutions implemented at both system and community levels. Reviews best practices in the control and prevention of juvenile delinquency.

  • CRJU 636 INFORMATION AND TECHNOLOGY IN CRIMINIAL JUSTICE (3)

    Explores how information is developed and processed into data informed decision making and policy. Analyze how to translate data information into knowledge. Presents a variety of criminal justice data information sources to provide an understanding of how data outcomes drive decision-making in the criminal justice system. Engage in more informed strategic and tactical planning and decision making using data systems, data management and data analysis techniques. prerequisite: none

  • CRJU 640 MANAGING POLICE ORGANIZATIONS (3)

    Application of managerial and administrative practices to police agencies. Emphasis on executive processes, including planning, decision-making, implementation and evaluation, structuring discretion, providing leadership and dealing with corruption and other abuses. An examination of the role of the police administrator in the community and the governmental structure.

  • CRJU 642 MANAGING CORRECTIONAL ORGANIZATIONS (3)

    Application of managerial and administrative practices to correctional agencies, focusing on the particular problems encountered in managing such agencies. Emphasis is on executive processes, including planning, decision-making, implementation and evaluation. Problems specific to secure facilities, probation, parole and community corrections are considered.

  • CRJU 666 POLITICS, LEGISLATION AND THE MEDIA IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE (3)

    Examines the influence and process of politics on the criminal justice system, the legislative process and how legislation is enacted, and general policy-making procedures. Includes analysis of the evolution of a crime problem and how it transforms into law, policy and practice and how politics and the media influence perceptions and reactions to criminal behavior that may lead to successful legislative outcomes. Explores the design and implementation of future forecasting models, guided by law and policy, specific to the criminal justice process and offers a problem-oriented approach to effective lobbying and utilization of media resources in policy-making. prerequisite: none.

  • CRJU 676 SYSTEMS AND APPLICATIONS IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE (3)

    Students diagnose and analyze real-world crime-related issues and problems in the criminal justice system. Examines decision-making techniques used in time-sensitive situations and crisis management. Offers a problem-oriented approach to effective leadership and management within the criminal justice system. prerequisite: none.

  • CRJU 680 FOUNDATIONS & IMPACT OF TRAUMA (3)

    Provides the foundation for understanding trauma and post-traumatic stress disorder in adults and children; examines the impact of trauma as well as describing the short and long term effects of trauma; and explains how past trauma can lead to ongoing problem behaviors. Develops skills and increases awareness of the necessary core competencies in trauma-informed services and administration. Also, provides an understanding of the impact and manifestation of vicarious traumatization and compassion fatigue on professionals. prerequisite: none

  • CRJU 682 TRAUMA INFORMED ORGANIZATIONS (3)

    Provides an understanding of how the impact of trauma can manifest behaviorally and may be elicited by normal interactions found within criminal justice system settings, and describes how to use trauma informed responses to reduce the intensity of difficult or dangerous situations. Explains how trauma informed criminal justice system responses can help to avoid re-traumatizing individuals, increase safety, and reduce future involvement in the system. Explains the benefits of capacity building among partners cross systems to link individuals to trauma-informed services and treatment as a means to increase an individual's ability to recover. prerequisite: none

  • CRJU 684 RESPONDING TO TRAUMA (3)

    Provides an understanding of trauma symptoms and the needs of trauma survivors; describes approaches for engaging individuals with histories of trauma; describes client·centered communication and interviewing skills for working with trauma; examines tools to identify and screen for trauma and mental health disorders to facilitate early intervention and treatment referrals. Increases knowledge of trauma~specific services, community resources, and self·care methods for reducing symptoms of vicarious trauma and burn-out. prerequisite: none

  • CRJU 685 ISSUES IN FORSENICS INVESTIGATION (3)

    Explores investigative theory and issues of forensic investigations. Examines the use of forensic science to various statutory offenses, solving crimes, and legal proceedings. Presents current issues in forensic investigations and analyzes its impact on the processing of criminal law and administration of justice. Chain of command in evidence preservation and the validity of forensic evidence in criminal proceedings are emphasized throughout the course. prerequisites: none

  • CRJU 686 TRAUMA INTERVENTIONS AND BEST PRACTICES (3)

    Examines evidence-based trauma interventions and emerging areas of best practices; describes the different models and techniques currently used with different populations and discusses their effectiveness. Examines how culture and ethnicity influence the experience and effects the treatment of trauma. prerequisite: none

  • CRJU 702 CONTEMPORARY ISSUES FOR VICTIMS OF CRIME (3)

    Analysis of crime and social reaction from the point of view of the offended. Focuses on the relatively recent emphasis on how crime creates problems for those victimized by criminals and analysis of whole populations victimized by persons known to them. Includes an analysis of the idea of restitution.

  • CRJU 703 SEMINAR IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE (3)

    Seminar devoted to a particular topic related to research, theory and/or applications in criminal justice. Sample topics include qualitative research in criminal justice, community crime prevention and juvenile justice history. May be repeated for credit when the topic changes. no prerequisite unless listed in schedule of classes

  • CRJU 704 BEST PRACTICES IN VICTIM SERVICES (3)

    Introduces the emerging field of victim services in context with the underlying legal structure of crime victims' rights. The impact of the legal structure of crime victims' rights has influenced both formal and informal responses to crime victims needs. A thorough analysis of the system of services, both with the criminal justice system and through other allied professions, is examined. Best practices in victim assistance programs-- from law enforcement through the courts and corrections systems to financial remedies, community- based advocacy, and treatment and support services- are also examined. Prerequisite: None

  • CRJU 705 A DIALOGUE WITH A VICTIM (3)

    Provides a critical and in-depth review of some of the communication barriers criminal justice personnel encounter when interacting with victims and witnesses in the course of an investigation. Critically examines competing narratives (e.g., individual, professional, personal, cultural) often present when interviewing a victim/witness and how these narratives can impede communication flow and the investigative process. Explore strategies to reduce these obstacles. Prerequisite: None.

  • CRJU 707 COMMUNITY CORRECTIONS (3)

    Analysis of the types, procedures, problems, theories and evaluation of supervision of adults and juveniles in the various forms of community-based corrections. Students will be responsible for understanding classic and contemporary research on this subject matter.

  • CRJU 708 LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE (3)

    Integrates evolving perspectives in leadership, principles of criminal justice administration, and relevant technological innovations and applications. Studies the influence of leadership as it relates to criminal justice organizational culture, governing bodies, strategic planning, succession planning, diversity and globalization. Prerequisite: None.

  • CRJU 710 ADVANCED CRIMINOLOGY: THEORY TO PRACTICE (3)

    Discusses classical and contemporary theories of criminal behavior and investigates how political, economic and social factors can cause paradigmatic shifts in how theory is both developed and applied in the real world. Students explore how theories are evaluated empirically and learn to develop and critique contemporary crime prevention and control policies by applying different theoretical models.

  • CRJU 713 SEMINAR IN JUDICIAL ADMINISTRATION (3)

    Evaluation of management problems relating to courts and the role of court functions and personnel.

  • CRJU 715 STUDIES/READING IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE (1 - 3)

    Designed to give the graduate student academic flexibility. Eligible for continuing studies grades. prerequisite: permission of program director

  • CRJU 722 STRATEGIC AND CRISIS MANAGEMENT IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE ORGANIZATIONS (3)

    Examines strategic and crisis management methodologies and tactics employed in criminal justice organizations. Provides foundational skills and financial literacy for managing resources and personnel while managing competing priorities. Identifies conflict management and resolution strategies in justice leadership. Explores the cultural, ethical, social and political effects on organizational management. Discusses the nature and impact of external forces on criminal justice management and leadership and an understanding of the need for organizational change. Prerequisites: none

  • CRJU 725 FUNDAMENTALS OF GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SCIENCE AND SYSTEMS (3)

    Provides students with foundational knowledge in both geographic information science and Systems that will allow them to better understand and think critically about the role of "place and space" and to engage in the routine use of basic GIS technology in their studies and workplace. Students will learn to use ESRl's ArcGIS to create maps and analyze geo-data and relationships, and to present their results to others. prerequisites: none.

  • CRJU 730 CONTEMPORARY ISSUES IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE (3)

    Examines contemporary issues pertaining to the criminal justice system. Explores the newest research and its impact on laws, policy, and practices. Evaluates the current issues in leading and managing the various complex agencies within the criminal justice system. Prerequisites: none

  • CRJU 742 MANAGING CORREC ORG (3)

    No course description available.

  • CRJU 777 CAPSTONE IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE (3)

    Capstone course offers students an opportunity to demonstrate their mastery of knowledge in the fields of criminology and criminal justice, gained while working toward completion of the graduate degree. Course is designed to be an integrative experience in which students combine their knowledge of criminological theory and of justice policy with practical skills to develop a comprehensive approach to planned change. Prerequisite: CRJU 601, 602, 603, 610, 708 and 710.

  • CRJU 798 CONTINUOUS ENROLLMENT (1)

    Provides continuing faculty direction, academic support services and enrollment services for students who have completed all course requirements for the degree but have not completed a thesis or final project. Students continue the independent work leading to finishing the thesis or final project that is significantly under way. Course may be repeated for credit as needed. Eligible for continuing studies (CS) grade; otherwise grading is pass/fail. prerequisite: completion of all course requirements for degree program

  • CRJU 799 THESIS (3 - 6)

    Supervised preparation of an original work displaying research and writing skills. 6 hours, plus defense. Students may register for 3 hours in each of two semesters or 6 hours in one semester. Eligible for continuing studies (CS) grade; otherwise grading is pass/fail. prerequisite: permission of program director