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FSCS Course Descriptions

  • FSCS 201 HOW TO GET AWAY WITH MURDER (3)

    The course involves the investigation of the causes of violence through viewing primary documents and also using secondary sources. These crimes of violence are then viewed through the perspective of investigators both procedural and scientific. Literature searches and summary reports are part of the writing process associated with the course. The course will introduce students to Criminology, Criminalistics, Offender Profiling, and Crime Scene Investigation. This will prepare the student for an introduction to Criminal Justice, Police Science, and Forensic Science. [SBS]

  • FSCS 301 FORENSIC SCIENCE (3)

    Introduces students to forensic science topics, including crime scene processing, fingerprints, firearms and toolmarks, questioned documents, serology, fire and explosives, trace evidence, pathology and instrumental analysis. Lectures, demonstrations, and basic laboratory exercises are used to present the subject matter.

  • FSCS 305 FUNDAMENTALS OF CYBERSECURITY (3)

    Provides a basic understanding of cybersecurity and its relationship with networks and operating systems. Students will be able to recognize threats to an organization and to infrastructure. Examines the frameworks, roles, and competencies involved with information security. The fundamentals of cybersecurity that will be examined include network and security concepts, attacker techniques, data security, system and applications security. Lab Fees: $65.

  • FSCS 307 CRIME SCENE INVESTIGATION (3)

    Focuses on the scientific techniques used to investigate different types of crime scenes, including burglaries, ­murders, rapes, arsons, and bombings. Students learn to recognize, identify, ­collect, preserve, transport, record, and process physical evidence such as body fluids, body fluid stains, items of trace evidence, tire and shoe impressions, latent fingerprints, weapons, and tools.

  • FSCS 310 CYBER CRIME AND THE LAW (3)

    Learn concepts and techniques related to data analytics and analysis techniques to discover forensic evidence. The course teaches students to apply basic statistical, machine learning, and artificial intelligence tools to describe, visualize, and analyze forensic data collected from computing devices. The class focuses on detecting anomalies on collected forensic log files.

  • FSCS 315 OPERATING SYSTEM FORENSICS (3)

    Explores the roles of an operating system, its basic functions, and the services provided by the operating system. Learn the forensic analysis of the three major operating systems (Windows, Mac OS X, and Linux) in the real world. Topics include disk acquisition and analysis, file system forensic, memory acquisition and analysis, timeline investigation, as well as tracking and analyzing operating system configuration settings. $65 course fee.

  • FSCS 320 INTERVIEWS AND INTERROGATIONS (3)

    Covers the basic and specific techniques employed in criminal justice interviews and interrogations. Emphasizes processes including the interpretation of verbal and physical behavior. Considers legal issue and distinctions. Upon completion of the course, students are able to understand and conduct interviews and interrogations in a legal, ethical, efficient and professional manner. Prerequisite: none.

  • FSCS 330 MOBILE FORENSICS (3)

    Provides a framework for learning the latest developments in wireless and mobile communications; the characteristics and operations of wireless network technologies. Examines wireless network principles, protocols, and applications and provides basic knowledge necessary to complete a logical acquisition of digital evidence from mobile devices. Demonstrates the use of wireless networks and mobile forensics investigative techniques and tools. Explains mobile forensics procedures and principles, related legal issues, mobile platform internals, bypassing passcode, rooting, logical and physical acquisition, data recovery and analysis. Some of the topics covered will include hand-on extraction using iOS, Blackberry and Android platforms. Lab Fees: $65.

  • FSCS 345 NETWORK FORENSICS (3)

    Explores the methodology and procedures associated with analyzing and mitigating threats in a network environment; identification of potential risks, inappropriate software activity, and security breaches. Examines the topologies, protocols, and applications required to conduct forensic analysis in networks. Other topics include an overview of the various types of VPNs and the utility of firewalls and limitations of firewalls. Explains network forensic principles, legal considerations, digital evidence controls, and documentation of forensic procedures. Laboratory exercises will reinforce practical applications of course instruction. Lab Fees: $65.

  • FSCS 360 ADVANCED PYTHON FOR FORENSICS (3)

    Provides advanced elements of regular expressions in Python; explores the python working with databases, files, Unicode and text encoding, and object-oriented coding in Python as it relates to forensics. Examines how to test and debug Python codes. Describes Python language and constructs used to write script and complex programs using Python's OOP model. Python software will be used to perform diagnostics and investigations, and ways to visualize data. The course will teach students to use the Python libraries as an investigative tool. Lab Fees: $65.

  • FSCS 375 FUNDAMENTALS OF CRYPTOGRAPHY (3)

    Introduces the historical and modern cryptography to ensure the confidentiality, integrity, and authenticity of data and communication. Study how cryptographic algorithms and protocols work and how to use them. Topics include symmetric cryptography, asymmetric cryptography, hash functions, as well as various attacks to cryptographic algorithms and protocols. Explores decryption techniques as applied to businesses and to government. Steganography is a process by which information is hidden within other media. Also presents the processes of hiding or encrypting data to inhibit a forensic analysis and of the detection and counter-resolution of hidden information. Lab Fees: $65.

  • FSCS 390 ETHICAL HACKING (3)

    Learn how to apply knowledge of engineering to security evaluations, design and conduct security assessment experiments as well as analyze and interpret the resulting data. Learn various practice techniques for penetration testing and provide various methods of discovering ways of exploiting vulnerabilities to gain access to a system. Understand professional and ethical responsibility. Recognize the need for life-long learning in the quickly changing cybersecurity environment. Lab Fees: $65. Prerequisites: FSCS 305, FSCS 310, and FSCS 360.

  • FSCS 400 LABORATORY SAFETY AND QUALITY ASSURANCE (3)

    Introduces students to the various principles of safety and quality assurance in a forensic laboratory. Laboratory safety topics include OSHA standards. Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS), workplace safety, personal protective equipment, employer liability, and employee responsibilities. Quality assurance topics include quality concepts and quality assurance principles, documentation, document control, standard operating procedures, proficiency testing, validation standards, test standards, instrument calibration, instrument maintenance, auditing principles, laboratory accreditation and analyst certification. Prerequisites: Biology I, Chemistry I and II, Organic Chemistry I and II, and Physics I and II.

  • FSCS 403 TRACE EVIDENCE (4)

    Focuses on the acquisition and analysis of trace materials commonly found in crime scenes. Laboratory fee required. prerequisites: Biology I, Chemistry I and II, Organic Chemistry I and II, Physics I and II, and FSCS 400 and FSCS 407 I.

  • FSCS 404 ARSON INVESTIGATION AND GLASS ANALYSIS (4)

    An introduction to the theory and practice of arson investigation through use of gas chromatography and to the theory and practice of glass analysis through lab use of the GRIM III Refractive Index Measuring System. Laboratory fee required. prerequisites: Biology I, Chemistry I and II, Organic Chemistry I and II, Physics I and II and FSCS 400 and FSCS 407 8.

  • FSCS 405 MICROSCOPY (4)

    Provides instruction in the methods of collecting, handling, preparing, identifying, and comparing items of trace evidence. Topics include use of the steromicroscope, compound microscope, comparison microscope, microspectrophotometer, scanning electron microscope, polarizing microscope, florescent microscope, and hot-stage microscope. These methods are demonstrated and students conduct hands-on analyses of materials using some of this equipment. Prerequisites: Biology I, Chemistry I and II, Organic Chemistry I and II, Physics I and II, and (or concurrent enrollment in) FSCS 400. Laboratory fee.

  • FSCS 407 INSTRUMENTAL ANALYSIS (4)

    The use of scientific instruments in forensic testing is the focus of this course. Lectures and laboratories cover instrumentation theory, data systems, method development, and qualitative and quantitative analytical techniques. Techniques discussed include gas chromatography (GC), liquid chromatograpy (LC), thin layer chromatography (TLC), ion chromatography (IC), capillary electrophoresis (CE), infrared spectrometry (IR), mass spectrometry (MS), and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Prerequisites: Biology I, Chemistry I and II, Organic Chemistry I and II, Physics I and II, FSCS 400 and FSCS 405. Laboratory fee.

  • FSCS 409 DRUG ANALYSIS (4)

    Introduces the scheduling of controlled substances and presents their analysis by crystal tests, color tests and instrumental techniques. prerequisites: Biology I, Chemistry I, and ii, Organic Chemistry i and II, Physics I and II, and FSCS 400 and FSCS 407.

  • FSCS 410 FORENSIC SEROLOGY (4)

    This course is designed to expose students to both the theoretical and practical aspects of forensic serology. At the end of the course students will have gained practical experience and will have a comprehensive knowledge of techniques presently being used in the forensic examination of body fluids. Prerequisites: Biology I, Chemistry I and II, Organic Chemistry I and II, Physics I and II, FSCS 400 and FSCS 405.

  • FSCS 412 FIREARMS/TOOL MARKS EXAMINATION (3)

    Firearms evidence is a major class of evidence developed in forensic related cases. The questions of identification, operability, and derived evidence are addressed and discussed. Related evidence such as tool mark evidence is also developed and explained. Prerequisite: none

  • FSCS 415 FORENSIC INVESTIGATIONS (3)

    Examines the theory, best practices, and methodologies to conduct computer forensics investigations; it includes ethical issues, evidence collection and preservation, data presentation, and chain-of evidence procedures. Explore current tools and technologies used to analyze, acquire, and organize digital evidence. Case studies are used to illustrate successful and sometimes less successful investigations. An introduction to LAN investigation as well as PC and Mac Forensics will be included. Lab Fees: $65. Prerequisites: FSCS Fundamentals of Cyber Security, FSCS 310 Cyber Crime and the Law.

  • FSCS 418 MATHEMATICAL APPLICATIONS IN POLICE SCIENCE (3)

    Introduces the ­various uses and applications of mathematics in law enforcement. Students learn to interpret and construct graphs and tables, calculate clearance rates, and ­conduct trend analysis. The basics of operational research are explored relative to the needs of law enforcement. Probabilities and statistical techniques, which provide the basis for DNA interpretation, are addressed.

  • FSCS 424 FOURTH AMENDMENT : INTERPRETATION AND APPLICATION (3)

    Covers the doctrines and cases inherent in and arising from the Fourth Amend­ment: the law of arrest, search and seizure, standing, forfeiture, and derivative evidence. Organized as a topical analysis, the course identifies the ­elements of each constitutional area and references major federal and state cases to illustrate the application and source of the rules.

  • FSCS 426 INNOVATIVE INVESTIGATIVE TECHNIQUES (3)

    Advanced techniques and strategies designed to further aid in investigating serious or complex crimes are presented. Particular attention is paid to the procedural aspects of police activity as they relate to the admissibility of evidence in state and federal prosecutions. Content includes improvements to basic investigative skills and a discussion of alternative tactics. Also covered are the necessary, suggested, and explicit requirements for a federal Title III investigation and a Maryland wiretap investigation.

  • FSCS 430 SPECIALTY WARRANTS, WIRETAPS, AND HISTORICAL CONSPIRACIES (3)

    Focuses on the extreme recourses available to law enforcement in investigating serious offenders. Content includes the legalities involved in obtaining trap and trace devices, electronic and video survellance, and body wires. These investigative techniques are then combined with traditional investigative techniques to develop historical conspiracies against criminal organizations.

  • FSCS 440 ADVANCED CRIME SCENE INVESTIGATION (3)

    The protection and analysis of a crime scene is a complex procedure. Information is obtained by utilizing ever increasing skills and technology. The skills involve the use of improved casting techniques, enhanced latent fingerprinting techniques and sophisticated new photographic techniques. This course introduces the student to these techniques. Lab Fee. Prerequisite: FSCS 307-Crime Scene Investigation

  • FSCS 445 FORENSIC DATA ANALYSIS (3)

    Learn concepts and techniques related to data analytics and analysis techniques to discover forensic evidence. Applying basic statistical, machine learning, and artificial intelligence tools to describe, visualize, and analyze forensic data collected from computing devices. Focus on detecting anomalies on collected forensic log files. Lab Fees: $65. Prerequisites: FSCS 305, 315, 345, and 415.

  • FSCS 454 DEATH INVESTIGATION (3)

    Presents the medical and legal investigation of death. The history and development of forensic pathology are considered. The course examines the manners of death, including, homicide, suicide, accidental, natural and undetermined. The course is organized in a lecture series format. Lecture topics include sharp and blunt force trauma, thermal injuries, drowning, drug and alcohol abuse, pediatric forensics, gunshot injuries, asphyxia and motor vehicle trauma.

  • FSCS 455 HOMICIDE INVESTIGATION (3)

    Analysis of homicide investigation from the viewpoint of the homicide detective exploring the legal issues and the practical use of interviews, interrogations, and medical and trace forensic evidence. prerequisite: None

  • FSCS 456 CHEMISTRY OF DEATH (3)

    Explores the fate of the human body at the time of death to the decomposition of the body into the lithosphere. Study considers biochemical and physical process involved in taphonomy. prerequisites: none

  • FSCS 460 FORENSIC PHOTOGRAPHY (3)

    Familiarizes students with, and provides basic understanding of, the camera (34mm, digital and video) with respect to crime scene analysis. Using photographic techniques, students will learn how to document a crime scene and pertinent physical evidence including tire impressions, shoe prints, latent prints and blood spatter. In addition, students wil explore available light, flash, flash fill and painting-by-light processes. Students will learn how to construct and maintain a photographic log and how to enter photographs into court as evidence. Students will create a portfolio of their work. Laboratory fee required.

  • FSCS 462 INTRODUCTION TO DOCUMENT EXAMINATION (3)

    Focuses on the origins and styles of writing and materials used in writing and in the formation of documents. prerequisite: permission of the program director.

  • FSCS 464 HANDWRITING ANALYSIS (3)

    Introduction to the study of hand writing analysis as relevant to the forensic analysis of documents. prerequisite: permission of program director.

  • FSCS 466 INSTRUMENTAL ANALYSIS IN DOCUMENT EXAMINATION (4)

    Practical experience in using instrumental techniques to examine documents by spectral imaging and impression analysis. Laboratory fee required. prerequites: FSCS 462, FSCS 464 and permission of the program director.

  • FSCS 480 FORENSIC DOCUMENTATION (3)

    Prepares students to document and ­manage cases properly from inception to successful conclusion. Students gain a basic understanding of investigative and forensic case documentation.

  • FSCS 482 MOOT COURT AND TRIAL ADVOCACY FOR FORENSICS (3)

    Students learn courtroom presentation techniques designed to elicit direct, persuasive, and comprehensive testimony as it relates to various evidentiary issues at criminal hearings and trials. Students prepare and present direct testimony and are cross-examined by attorneys in a simulated courtroom setting. [CAP]

  • FSCS 484 ART AND FORENSICS (3)

    An introduction to various styles of art and their analysis using forensic techniques. Security, storage and exhibition are examined. Laboratory fee required. Prerequisite: none

  • FSCS 487 FIELD INTERNSHIP IN FORENSIC SCIENCE (3)

    Provides field experience to students through laboratory assignments with various criminal justice entities. This requirement is completed at the end of the program. Eligible for continuing studies grade.

  • FSCS 490 FORENSIC INCIDENT RESPONSE - CAPSTONE (3)

    Examines the methods, procedures, and policies necessary for a collaborative incident response team. Allows opportunity to review, analyze, and integrate what has been learned in each of the prerequisites courses. Students will learn how incident response teams organize, identify, and gather evidence using a number of real-world scenario cases related to various aspects of cyber forensics to complete a capstone project that demonstrate mastery of the culmination of the cyber forensics degree program. Prerequisites: FSCS 305, 310, 315, 330, 345, 360, 375, and 390.

  • FSCS 493 HONORS SEMINAR (3)

    An advanced interdisciplinary seminar that focuses on important books and issues and encourages independent thinking, clear presentation and an understanding of the concerns and methods of various disciplines. The course may be team taught; topic and instructor(s} may change from semester to semester. Course may be repeated for credit when topic changes. Prerequisites; 3.5 GPA and permission of both the Denit Honors Program director

  • FSCS 494 HONORS PROJECT (3 - 6)

    Directed indiv\dua\ instructioo in an advanced prQjec\ of ina student's choice; ihe prQject must be academically related to this discipline. Each student works closely with afaculty director who guides hislher progress. The project must be of honors qualit1 and must be 'fina\\y approved by both the fatuity director and asecond facult1 member. Course is eligible for a continuing studies grade. Prerequisites: Honors standing. 3.5 GPA and permission of both the Denit Honors Program director and the faculty director

  • FSCS 496 FIELD INTERNSHIP IN POLICE SCIENCE (3)

    Broadens the educational experience of students through appropriate observational and work assignments with criminal investigation units. This requirement is completed at the end of the program. Eligible for continuing studies grade.

  • FSCS 497 TOPICS IN FORENSICS (3)

    Examines special topics and issues in the field of forensics such as homicide investigation, blood spatter analysis, and forensic medicine and public health. Course may be repeated for credit when the topic changes.

  • FSCS 498 LABORATORY TOPICS IN FORENSICS (4)

    This course will cover special laboratory topics and issues in the field of forensics such as DNA analysis, questioned document examination, and drug analysis. FSCS 498 may be repeated for credit when the topic changes. No prerequisite unless listed in the schedule of classes.

  • FSCS 499 DIRECTED INDEPENDENT STUDY (1 - 6)

    No course description available.

  • FSCS 600 LEGAL ISSUES IN FINANCIAL CRIMES (3)

    Examines the general regulations, general laws, and ethics and business policies associated with financial crimes. Areas of major focus include legal issues facing management and administration, traditional search and seizure as well as privacy issues, manager and supervisor responsibilities, criminal issues and definitions, chain of custody and ethical considerations. This problem-oriented course focuses on applying the holdings of cases and analyses of statutes to different criminal fact patterns. Prerequisite: None

  • FSCS 601 LEGAL ISSUES IN HIGH TECHNOLOGY CRIME (3)

    Examines the general regulations, general and computer-related law, and ethics and business policies associated with high technology crime. Areas of major focus include description of legal issues facing management and administration, traditional search and seizure as well as privacy issues, manager and supervisor responsibilities, criminal issues and definitions, chain of custody and ethical considerations. Problem-oriented course that focuses on applying the holdings of cases and analyses of statutes to different criminal fact patterns. Prerequisites: None

  • FSCS 602 MONEY LAUNDERING (3)

    An essential element of financial crimes is the ability to move assets in ways that resist detection. Explores frequently used techniques, reviews national and international laws and practices to prevent money laundering, and describes best practices to minimize the ability to use money laundering as part of financial crimes. Prerequisite: None.

  • FSCS 610 IDENTIFYING ORGANIZATIONAL LIABILITIES AND CRIME (3)

    Defines problems, logic and theory, research protocols, personal and organizational risks, criminal and civil liabilities, physical security issues, due diligence matters, environmental concerns and sexual harassment issues. Covers responsibilities of the organization and of the individual.

  • FSCS 615 INFORMATION RETRIEVAL : PAPER AND ELECTRONIC (3)

    Learn the fundamentals of data, information, computing technology, and information retrieval, with a focus on the understanding of computer hardware components, operating systems, and networks, as well as how raw data is associated with software and hardware.

  • FSCS 620 FORENSIC INVESTIGATIVE TECHNIQUE I (3)

    Focuses on traditional investigative techniques (interviews and interrogations), simple data collection, physical evidence, fraud detection, data acquisition and computer techniques, reverse engineering, and industrial espionage. Also, examines administrative process, the role of human resources and accounting, organizational processes and structures, and chain of command / management. Intended as an introduction to FSCS 720. Prererequisite: FSCS 615. Lab fee.

  • FSCS 630 INTRODUCTION TO CRYPTOGRAPHY (3)

    Provides the historical basis for ciphers and encryption techniques and examines the use of codes and decryption techniques in government and commercial applications. Reviews the responsibilities of a Security Analyst, including recognizing breaches of security, controlling further risk, and identifying methods for gathering forensic evidence. prerequisite: FSCS 615. Lab Fee

  • FSCS 635 IMAGE ANALYSIS (3)

    Examines the effective manipulation of digital images from digital photographs and videotapes. Discusses identification of authenticity and detection of manipulation in addition to detection of fraud and other criminal activity in these digital media. Prerequisite: FSCS 630 Lab Fee.

  • FSCS 640 STEGANOGRAPHY (3)

    Steganography is a process by which information is hidden within other media. Presents tools (software) to detect such hidden information, including files, images, network traffic, disks, etc., that masquerade within any system. Also presents the processes of hiding or encrypting data to inhibit a forensic analysis and of the detection and counter-resolution of hidden information. Prerequisite: FSCS 630 and FSCS 635. Lab Fee.

  • FSCS 685 MOBILE FORENSICS (3)

    This course provides a hands-on approach to mobile forensics investigation. Students acquire knowledge of scientific methodologies and practical skills with the goal of extracting digital evidence in a legal context. The program uses modern, open source, and commercial forensic tools and techniques to deliver high-caliber instruction while at the same time, ensuring investigations are forensically sound. Students learn how to conduct a mobile forensics investigation where the results may be used in criminal proceedings. The course will provide extensive laboratory exercises on various phases of the mobile forensics process for both Android, Windows, and iOS based devices. Some of the goals of the course are to produce knowledgeable students who can identify, collect, examine, and analyze mobile evidence while using hardware and software. The chain of command, evidence preservation, validity of forensic evidence are emphasized throughout the course.

  • FSCS 720 FORENSIC INVESTIGATIVE TECHNIQUES II (3)

    A continuation of FSCS 620 with special attention to computer systems and network systems. Lab Fee required. Prerequisite: FSCS 620

  • FSCS 724 PROTECTION OF DATA / INFORMATION (3)

    Examines prevention of data / information loss by theft, intrusion, and natural disaster and assessment of vulnerabilities and their remediation. Also presents protocols for security and for effective data storage and examines assessment of risk. Prerequisite: FSCS 615. Lab Fee.

  • FSCS 727 COMPUTER AND DIGITAL FORENSICS (3)

    Examines the use of specialized techniques for recovery, authentication, and analysis of electronic data; reconstruction of computer usage; examination of residual data; and authentication of remaining data. Also, examines the effective manipulation of digital images from digital photographs and videotapes. Discusses identifjcation of authenticity and detection of manipulation in addition to detection of fraud and other criminal activity in these digital media. Lab fee required. Prerequisite FSCS 630.

  • FSCS 728 INFORMATION SYSTEMS, THREATS, ATTACKS, AND DEFENSE STRATEGIES (3)

    Examines information systems and the threats from malicious activities that attempt to collect data from or disrupt, deny or destroy information within a system. Explores origins of such attacks and effective responses to threat. Also, examines the process of Steganography by which information is hidden within other media. Presents tools (software) to detect such hidden information, including files, images, network traffic, disks, etc., that masquerade within any system. Also presents the processes of hiding or encrypting data to inhibit a forensic analysis and the detection and counter-resolution of hidden information. Lab fee required. prerequisite: FSCS 630

  • FSCS 730 INCIDENT RESPONSE (3)

    Explores the development of effective responses to active attacks on computer systems and networks, coupled with analysis of the breakdown of protective measures. Permission of program director required.

  • FSCS 740 GRADUATE INTERNSHIP (3)

    Provides field experience to students through laboratory assignments with various forensic or criminal justice entities. Course is completed at the end of the program and requires submission of a journal and a research paper. Eligible for continuing studies grade. Prerequisite: Successful completion of all foundation courses in MSFS degree program and permission of program director.

  • FSCS 750 CAPSTONE COURSE (3)

    Capstone course requires students to integrate and apply knowledge, theories, principles, skills and practical applications learned in Master of Science in Forensic Science- High Technology Crime core courses to actual high technology case scenarios. prerequisite: successful completion of all core courses in M.S. in Forensic Science program and permission of program director.

  • FSCS 753 COMPUTER AND DIGITAL SECURITY MANAGEMENT (3)

    A study of the management of networks, types and sources of threats and vulnerabilities, risk management, firewalls and other security issues. Prerequisite: FSCS 615, 727, and 728. Lab Fee.