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College of Public Affairs Course Descriptions

Browse the course descriptions of all courses that the College of Public Affairs offers.

  • CSCE: Community Studies/Civic Engage

    CSCE 100 URBAN SOLUTIONS (3)

    Provides an introduction to the field of urban studies and to the practices of studying cities and metropolitan areas. Students are exposed to a variety of current and historic urban challenges as well as policy solutions. The course exposes students to the complexity of life in metropolitan regions, using the Baltimore area and other cities nationally and internationally as case studies. [SOSC] [QQT] [GIK] [CTE] [SBS]

    CSCE 200 UNDERSTANDING COMMUNITY (3)

    Allows students to explore basic concepts of community: a group’s history and change over time, the lines that divide communities, the physical movement of groups, the responsibilities of individuals within the community and the role community plays in social control. Students begin to master the skills of selection and synthesis as they use historical documents, census data, community mapping, field observations, nonfiction and fiction to make observations about groups and compare their findings to the ways groups are depicted by outsiders. [SOSC] [QQT] [GIK] [CTE] [SBS]

    CSCE 297 TOPICS IN COMMUNITY STUDIES (1 - 3)

    Exploration of topics in Community Studies or Civic Engagement. the actual topic of the course will appear in the schedule of classes. Prerequisite: Depends on course topic and level of difficulty.

    CSCE 300 COMMUNITY CASE STUDIES (3)

    Focuses on reading the core philosophy and history of community studies and applying the abstract concepts to a number of case studies of successful problem-solving organizations. Students examine one organization in depth, analyze the issues the organization addresses, identify the assets it draws upon and evaluate the solutions it develops.

    CSCE 301 INTRODUCTION TO NONPROFIT LEADERSHIP (3)

    Introduces students to personal and professional competencies relevant to careers in nonprofit organizations. Special emphasis is placed on individual and community development as the pivotal functions of nonprofit organizations and on collaboration as the central mode of public problem-solving.

    CSCE 302 FUNDRAISING AND GRANT WRITING (3)

    Provides students with a thorough grounding in the principles and practices of fundraising and grant proposal development. The course is structured to mirror the process of fundraising management and by the course's conclusion, students will have developed a fundraising plan or a grant proposal for their own nonprofit organization or a case study of the organization. The course considers planning frameworks and a variety of conceptual tools exploring donor behaviors ( the underlying psychology and sociology) and each major form of fundraising. The course concludes with an examination of the critical managerial and sectoral issues impacting fundraising functions, such as campaign integration, benchmarking of performance, and public trust and confidence.

    CSCE 306 LEADERSHIP FOR SOCIAL CHANGE (3)

    Introduces students to leadership theory and to the history and concepts of community organizing for social change. Encourages careful analysis of responsibilities and commitment in the context of leadership for the common good and for purposeful change. Students explore how to create change in society through everyday acts of leadership and by learning about their own leadership styles. Provides opportunities for practical application, documentation of leadership styles, and reflection on individual responsibility for and potential in leadership roles. Prerequisite: None.

    CSCE 311 SOCIAL AWARENESS AND ETHICAL RESPONSIBLITY (3)

    Focuses on the relationships among ethics, public policy and business enterprise. Designed to help participants think globally about diversity and civic engagement, this course continues students' preparation for leadership position in a global society. Focuses on improving personal leadership skills and on emphasizing the importance of leading consistently with the highest ethical principles and values. Prerequisite: None

    CSCE 315 COMMUNITY ORGANIZATIONS IN A DIGITAL WORLD (3)

    Examines digital and online efforts of community organizations to build community leadership and civic engagement. Explores the ways in which information technologies have transformed and are transforming community organizations and how these technologies affect a range of social, political and economic issues from individual to organizational and societal levels. Focuses on how technological applications may provide more effective and efficient pathways for community organizations to communicate with their stakeholders and to reach their strategic goals, which include the use of social media. Prerequisite: None.

    CSCE 400 NONPROFIT MANAGEMENT (3)

    Nonprofit organizations are key to the functioning of civil society. The United States has one of the world’s most vibrant nonprofit communities. In this practical skills course, students examine how to carry out the responsibilities of organizing and managing a nonprofit, with focus on organizations framed under 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code. Students explore effective mission, incorporation and vision statements; board and staff roles and relationships; ethics; budgets and fundraising; and maintaining nonprofit status. This course helps students meet a number of American Humanics competency requirements. prerequisite: CSCE 301 or permission of the CSCE program director

    CSCE 401 Economic and Community Development (3)

    Using theory and practice, this course emphasizes the programs and policies that enhance the economic vitality of low- and moderate-income communities and organizations to provide an understanding of the basis for both economic and community development along with a basic set of practical tools to enable the student to work in the field of community development. This course features a service-learning component.

    CSCE 412 COMMUNITY LEADERSHIP AND DECISION-MAKING (3)

    Designed to provide students with the competencies necessary to be an effective community leader and decision-maker in the context of community planning, relationship building across networks and social organizing. Students are exposed to public decision-making from local to national government. Examines the primary skills needed for effective engagement in political and civic discussion, deliberation, advocacy and action. Prerequisite: None.

    CSCE 481 COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT EXPERIENCE (3)

    Provides students with the opportunity to become involved in the work of a community organization. The goal of the course is to provide students with a community engagement experience for up to 120 hours. Writing assignments and reflection activities required. Prerequisite: CSCE 200, 300, and 306.

    CSCE 482 CAPSTONE SEMINAR (3)

    Focuses on the integration of concepts and ideas drawn from each of the core course requirements. Each student develops an original capstone project based on a real world problem/ solution in collaboration with a community organization. The capstone project will be designed in consultation with the CSCE program director. Permission of program director required. Prereq: CSCE 200, 300, 301, 302, 306, 311, 315, 400, 412, and 481.

    CSCE 492 INDEPENDENT STUDY (3)

    Provides students with the opportunity to pursue a research topic or community service project in depth over the course of a semester. An interested student submits a proposal to a faculty member who agrees to be the adviser for the study. The faculty member and the student negotiate the terms of study and the requirements for the final product. prerequisite: permission of the program director

    CSCE 493 HONORS SEMINAR (3)

    An advanced interdisciplinary seminar that focuses on important books and issues, encourages independent thinking, clear presentation, and an understanding of the concerns and methods of various disciplines. The course may be team taught; topic and instructor(s) may change from semester to semester. Course may be repeated for credit when topic changes. Prerequisites: 3.5 GPA and permission of the Honors Director.

    CSCE 494 HONORS PROJECT (3 - 6)

    Directed individual instruction in an advanced project of the student’s choice; the project must be academically related to this discipline. Each student works closely with a faculty director who guides his/her progress. The project must be of honors quality and must be finally approved by both the faculty director and a second faculty member. Course is eligible for a continuing studies grade. prerequisites: 3.3 3.5 GPA and permission of both the Denit Honors Program director and the faculty director

    CSCE 497 SPECIAL TOPICS IN COMMUNITY STUDIES AND CIVIL ENGAGEMENT (3)

    An examination of a selected topic or issue related to the research interests of CSCE faculty or a collaboration with a local nonprofit in a one-time community project. Course may be repeated for credit when topic changes.

  • CRJU: Criminal Justice

    CRJU 200 CRIMINAL JUSTICE (3)

    Examines the fundamental concepts of the criminal justice field; the history, philosophy, social development and operations of police, courts, and corrections in a democratic society; and criminal justice careers. Prerequisite: None. [SOSC] [QQT] [GIK] [SBS]

    CRJU 220 POLICE AND SOCIETY (3)

    This course is an overview, designed to examine law enforcement service delivery at the local, state and federal levels of government. Special emphasis wil be placed upon the historical development of the law enforcement role in contemporary society and how it shapes the type of law enforcement service that can be expected in the future. Prerequisite: Not Applicable

    CRJU 301 THE CONTEMPORARY CRIMINAL JUSTICE SYSTEM (3)

    A critical analysis of the contemporary criminal justice system. Political, economic, and societal contexts provide the framework for an examination of system-wide issues, current problems, and challenges facing the criminal justice system. Prerequisite: CRJU 200 or equivalent.

    CRJU 302 CRIMINAL JUSTICE RESEARCH METHODS (3)

    A survey of the research methods and techniques utilized within the field of criminal justice and criminology. Topics discussed include research designs, sampling, data collection, ­quantitative versus qualitative methods, and applications to criminal justice planning and administration.

    CRJU 304 CJ PROFESSIONAL STUDIES (3)

    Assists students with criminal justice database technologies and with writing and research skills specific to the field of criminal justice. Contains units on conducting secondary research, learning to write for the academic setting (e.g., literature reviews, empirical studies) versus the applied setting (e.g., case summaries, incident reports) and preparing for a career in criminal justice. prerequisite: passing of Upper Division Writing Placement Test prior to enrolling in CRJU 304 and course must be taken within the first 18 credits of the major. SCJ students who earn a B+ or better in WRIT 300 are exempt from taking CRJU 304. Students who are exempt will instead be required to take an additional 3 credit elective.

    CRJU 306 CRIMINOLOGICAL PERSPECTIVES (3)

    The major paradigms, models, and theories that form the foundation of criminal justice and criminology are examined. Using current texts, journals, and reports, the course examines the range of explanations of criminal ­behavior, focusing on attempts to ­integrate ­perspectives and theories.

    CRJU 320 POLICE ADMINISTRATION (3)

    Study of line and staff functions in police organizations. Examination of organization principles, management functions, and organizational behavior as they relate to police agencies. Emphasis upon the behavioral science approach to supervising and managing police personnel.

    CRJU 330 CRIMINAL LAW (3)

    An examination of the general and specific parts of the substantive criminal law in the United States, its development within historical an societal contexts, and its representation in statutory and case law. Consideration is given to problems of application and interpretation of the written law.

    CRJU 334 CRIMINAL PROCEDURES (3)

    This course is designed to present the principles and applications of procedural criminal law in the United States. Such procedural laws are supplemented by rules of evidence and decisions of the U.S. Supreme Court on key constitutional questions. Prerequisite: CRJU 200 Criminal Justice or equivalent.

    CRJU 341 CORRECTIONAL PERSPECTIVES (3)

    Introduces students to the history, role, functions, problems, and contemporary practices of correctional facilities, including prisons, jails, and community corrections, e.g., probation and parole, and the role and difficulties of inmates and correctional officers.

    CRJU 390 VICTIMOLOGY (3)

    An introduction to the study of crime victims. Examines the victim's role in crime, the criminal justice system's handling of victims, and victim services. Prerequisite: CRJU 301.

    CRJU 392 THE TRAUMA OF VICTIMIZATION (3)

    Provides the foundation for understanding the trauma of victimization; examines the impact of trauma and describes the short and long term effects of trauma; and explains how past trauma can lead to ongoing problem behaviors. Develops skills and increases awareness of the necessary core competencies in trauma-informed services and administration. prerequisite: none

    CRJU 394 MULTI-DISCIPLINARY PERSPECTIVES ON INTERPERSONAL VIOLENCE (3)

    Examines the complicated nature and dynamics of interpersonal violence. Presents a general overview of interpersonal violence, such as definitions, characteristics, and theoretical models; and various sources of data on interpersonal violence and measurement issues. Provides the historical development and evolution of the multidisciplinary response to interpersonal violence including law enforcement response, specialized courts, and treatment programs; civil actions; and the role of community and human service agencies. Current issues and innovations related to interpersonal violence are integrates throughout the course. prerequisite: none

    CRJU 396 CONTEMPORARY ISSUES FOR VICTIMS OF CRIME (3)

    Analysis of crime and social reaction from the point of view of those who are offended, the crime victims. The course focuses on the relatively recent emphasis on how crime creates problems for those victimized by criminals and analysis of whole populations victimized by persons known to them. Analysis of contemporary issues relating to crime victimization as they have evolved based on legal, political, and social changes. prerequisite: none

    CRJU 398 BEST PRACTICES FOR VICTIM SERVICES (3)

    Introduces the emerging field of victim services in context with the underlying legal structure of victims' rights. The system of victim services both within the criminal justice system and through other allied professions are examined. Best practices in victim assistance programs -from law enforcement through the courts and corrections systems to financial remedies, community-based advocacy, and treatment and support services -are also reviewes. prerequiste: none

    CRJU 400 A DIALOGUE WITH A VICTIM (3)

    Provides a critical and in-depth review of some of the communication barriers criminal justice personnel will encounter when interacting with victims and witnesses in the course of an investigation. Particular attention is spent critically examining the competing narratives (e.g., individual, professional, personal, cultural) that often present when interviewing a victim/ witness, and how those narratives can impede the flow of communication and the investigative process. Strategies to reduce these obstacles are explored. Prerequisite: None

    CRJU 404 COMPARATIVE CRIMINAL JUSTICE (3)

    Examines comparative criminal justice: how different societies around the world practice criminal justice relative to practices in the United States. Multi­disciplinary approach considers the economic, governmental, geographical, and social situations in the selected countries. Prerequisite CRJU 301

    CRJU 406 POLITICAL TERRORISM (3)

    An overview of the definitional and conceptual issues, types, history, causes and effects of oppositional political terrorism. The events of Sept. 11, including its major actors such as Osama bin Laden, al-Qaeda and the Taliban, are explored, including the reaction to this event by the United States and its allies over the past decade. The course then looks at the changes that have occurred since. Prerequisite: CRJU 301

    CRJU 408 CRIME AND DELINQUENCY PREVENTION (3)

    A review of major crime and delinquency prevention strategies, including punitive, mechanical, and corrective prevention policies and programs. Selected prevention programs and policies are highlighted for in-depth evaluation. Prerequisite: CRJU 301.

    CRJU 420 SPEC PROBS IN POLICING (3)

    Issues and problems in policing a free society. The role and ­function of the police, the effects of ­contemporary police practices, the ­exercise and control of police power. Examination of current problems and proposals for reform Prerequisite: CRJU 301

    CRJU 430 JUVENILE JUSTICE (3)

    An examination of youthful law violation and the juvenile justice system. The ­history, law, operations and agencies of juvenile justice are analyzed as are alternative approaches to defining, preventing and responding to youthful law violation.

    CRJU 432 CRIMINAL COURTS (3)

    An exploration of the multidisciplinary ­literature on the criminal courts in the United States, focusing on the social, political, and organizational contexts of the court, the court’s case flow, and the various actors in the court’s process. Contemporary issues are highlighted. Prerequisite: CRJU 301

    CRJU 441 SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN CORRECTION (3)

    In-depth analysis of the issues, problems, and suggested reforms facing the contemporary role and practices of correctional facilities, including prisons, jails, and community corrections, e.g., probation and parole, and the role, functions, and difficulties of inmates and correctional officers. Prerequisite: CRJU 301 or CRJU 341

    CRJU 442 COMMUNITY CORRECTIONS (3)

    An examination of practices and ­problems of community corrections, including but not limited to probation, parole, halfway houses, and fines. Prerequisite: CRJU 301 or CRJU 341

    CRJU 445 THE INSIDE-OUT PRISON EXCHANGE PROGRAM (3)

    Inside-Out brings "outside" students -college undergraduates and graduates, particularly those pursuing careers in criminal justice and related fields together with "inside" students -incarcerated men and women -to study as peers behind prison walls. The semester-long course provides a trans formative experience that allows the outside students to contextualize and rethink what they have learned in the classroom, gaining insights that will help them pursue the work of creating an effective, humane, restorative criminal justice system. prerequisites: none

    CRJU 451 MINORITIES, CRIME AND JUSTICE (3)

    An analysis of race, ethnicity and gender issues and how they impact the criminal justice system. An examination of how race, ethnicity, and gender issues revolve around questions associated with evidence of dsparity, disproportionality and discrimination within the criminal justice system.

    CRJU 454 CRIMINAL BEHAVIOR (3)

    An examination of selected types of crime or criminal behavior patterns, such as white collar crime, violent crime, organized crime, drugs and crime, or age and crime. The topic studied appears in the Class Schedule. CRJU 454 may be repeated for credit when the topic changes. Prerequisite: CRJU 301

    CRJU 456 DRUGS AND CRIME (3)

    An examination of various topics and issues relating drugs and crime in the United States. This course explores social, legal, medical, and political factors, as well as changes in attitudes that contribute to drug use and policy. Prominent drugs-crime issues and projections for the future are included. Prerequisite: CRJU 301 Social Justice in the Urban Community

    CRJU 464 CRIMINAL JUSTICE ISSUES (3)

    An examination of a selected topic or issue, such as women and criminal justice, private security, cirminal justice legislation, or ethical issues. The topic studied will appear in the Schedule of Classes. CRJU 464 may be repeated for credit when the topic changes. Prerequisite: CRJU 301 Social Justice in the Urban Community

    CRJU 485 ADVANCED CRIMINAL JUSTICE STUDIES (3)

    The senior level ­capstone experience. The focus is multi-disciplinary, and the emphasis is on the ­integration and application of theory, research methods, and statistics. The problems of data gathering and reporting, and relationships of theory, research, and practice in the field are addressed. Prerequisites: CRJU 301, 302, 304,306, and MATH 115.

    CRJU 490 CRIMINAL JUSTICE INTERNSHIP (3)

    A practicum designed to broaden the educational experience of students through appropriate observational and work assignments with criminal justice agencies. Correlation of theoretical knowledge with practice emphasized. Prerequisite: CRJU 301, senior status, and consent of instructor. This course may be taken for a continuing studies (CS) grade.

    CRJU 493 HONORS SEMINAR (3)

    An advanced interdisciplinary seminar that focuses on important books and issues, encourages independent thinking, clear presentation, and an understanding of the concerns and methods of various disciplines. The course may be team taught; topic and instructor(s) may change from semester to semester. Course may be repeated for credit when topic changes. Prerequisites: 3.3 GPA and permission of the Honors Director.

    CRJU 494 HONORS PROJECT (3 - 6)

    Directed individual instruction in an advanced project of the student’s choice; the project must be academically related to this discipline. Each student works closely with a faculty director who guides his/her progress. The project must be of honors quality and must be finally approved by both the faculty director and a second faculty member. Course is eligible for a CS grade. Prerequisite: Honors standing, a 3.3 gpa. and permission of both the Honors Program Director and the faculty director.

    CRJU 498 DIRECTED INDEPENDENT STUDIES (1 - 3)

    Designed to provide credit for a student who wants to pursue independent work under the supervision of a staff member. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. Eligible for Continuing Studies (CS) grade.

    CRJU 499 SENIOR THESIS (3 - 6)

    No course description available.

    CRJU 501 PROFESSIONAL SKILLS IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE (3)

    Focuses on professional skills that will prepare students for graduate-level coursework and for future employment. Includes navigating criminal justice databases, interpreting empirical research, writing in a technical style, creating an effective PowerPoint document and strengthening oral presentation skills. Relies on a combination of group and individual exercises in both traditional lecture format and hands-on workshops to address each skill set. Pass/fail grading; to earn a passing grade, students must earn a B or better in this course.

    CRJU 600 Ethical Issue in Criminal Justice (3)

    Examines ethical and moral values and professional responsibilities and decision-making as they pertain to the criminal justice system. Recognize characteristics of an ethical system and ethical frameworks for various criminal justice organizations. Explores ethical implications of discretionary power and various policy issues. Analyzes ethical dilemmas and ethical conduct versus misconduct.

    CRJU 601 CRIME AND POLICY DEVELOPMENT (3)

    Addresses the issue of how crime is measured in the United States and discusses why certain crimes capture the attention of lawmakers and the public more than do others. Examines why lawmakers have adopted certain responses to address crime and critically evaluates whether such strategies are effective in reducing crimes. Students research best practices within the field and are introduced to different analytical techniques to evaluate quantitative crime data. Prerequisites: None

    CRJU 602 RESEARCH TECHNIQUES IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE (3)

    Provides knowledge of and experience with the methods used in studying social science problems. Emphasis is on research, designs and instruments and policy implications. Critical and analytical skills are developed for use in future research and proposal writing. This course is a prerequisite for CRJU 603.

    CRJU 603 CRIMINAL JUSTICE STATISTICS (3)

    Introduces students to the relevance and importance of statistics in studying criminal justice problems. Explores different types of data, data-management techniques and different statistical methods to aid in the preparation of agency and formal research reports. Required for all criminal justice students.

    CRJU 605 GRADUATE INTERNSHIP (3)

    Students will work 120 hours in a selected agency, institution or office within the criminal justice field, and will complete classroom work that focuses on career development and management skills. Required of all students. ( Note: Students who are currently working in the criminal justice field may be waived from this course at the discretion of the program director. Students who are waived must then complete an extra elective.) Prerequisite: Permission of program director.

    CRJU 606 CONTEMPORARY CRIMINAL COURT ISSUES (3)

    In-depth analysis of selected current issues pertaining to criminal court systems. Focuses on the current research literature and considers the operational consequences of alternative responses to the issues discussed.

    CRJU 610 ADMINISTRATION OF JUSTICE (3)

    Analysis of the major conceptions of justice and the ways these conceptions affect the manner in which social and legal systems are constituted. Examines theoretical perspectives with a view to understanding the relationships between various institutions and the administration of justice. Presents a comparative and historical focus on local, national and international systems of justice.

    CRJU 611 CONTEMPORARY ISSUES IN CORRECTIONS (3)

    In-depth analysis of the contemporary structure of the correctional system in the United States. Evaluates the system's issues in managing and supervising a growing offender population. Explorers the latest research on best practice for institutional and community correctional programming.

    CRJU 615 INSIDE-OUT PRISION EXCHANGE PROGRAM (3)

    Inside-Out brings "outside" students college undergraduates and graduates. particularly those pursuing careers in criminal justice and related fields -together with "inside" students -incarcerated men and women -to study as peers behind prison walls. The semester-long course provides a transformative experience that allows the outside students to contextualize and rethink what they have learned in the classroom, gaining insights that will help them pursue the work ofcreating an effective, humane, restorative criminal justice system.

    CRJU 626 PROFESSIONAL COMMUNICATIIONS IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE (3)

    Examines strategies and techniques used to obtain information in a variety of situations, to differentiate between interview and interrogation, to interact with diverse populations, to communicate with the media and to analyze information for consideration as evidence. Explores how the use of appropriate communications techniques and procedures leads to effective leadership, management and supervision within the criminal justice system. prerequisite: none

    CRJU 631 CONTEMPORARY ISSUES IN POLICING (3)

    Examines the social and political contexts of policing in contemporary society and evaluates current issues law enforcement faces when dealing with crime control, prevention, and maintenance of order. Explores the latest research on the effect of police policies, programs and practices.

    CRJU 632 POLICING SPECIAL POPULATIONS (3)

    Examines the research literature related to the special populations and groups of people that the police organization is mandated to manage based on statutory law, operating policies and procedures, and tradition and custom. Helps students understand how and why police intervene in the way that they do with some subgroups within the broader population.

    CRJU 633 RACE/ETHNICITY AND GENDER ISSUES IN LAW ENFORCEMENT (3)

    Examines the research literature related to the impact of race/ethnicity and gender on the police organization. Examines the various ways that a suspect’s or victim’s race/ethnicity or gender creates problems and makes it difficult for the police organization to effectively meet the law enforcement needs of a particular community.

    CRJU 635 YOUTH PROBLEMS IN SOCIETY (3)

    Discusses the role of demographics, developmental issues, family, school, peers and individual roles in youth behavior. Analyzes the major studies and theoretical foundations of juvenile delinquency and identifies and analyzes the current solutions implemented at both system and community levels. Reviews best practices in the control and prevention of juvenile delinquency.

    CRJU 636 INFORMATION AND TECHNOLOGY IN CRIMINIAL JUSTICE (3)

    Explores how information is developed and processed into data informed decision making and policy. Analyze how to translate data information into knowledge. Presents a variety of criminal justice data information sources to provide an understanding of how data outcomes drive decision-making in the criminal justice system. Engage in more informed strategic and tactical planning and decision making using data systems, data management and data analysis techniques. prerequisite: none

    CRJU 640 MANAGING POLICE ORGANIZATIONS (3)

    Application of managerial and administrative practices to police agencies. Emphasis on executive processes, including planning, decision-making, implementation and evaluation, structuring discretion, providing leadership and dealing with corruption and other abuses. An examination of the role of the police administrator in the community and the governmental structure.

    CRJU 642 MANAGING CORRECTIONAL ORGANIZATIONS (3)

    Application of managerial and administrative practices to correctional agencies, focusing on the particular problems encountered in managing such agencies. Emphasis is on executive processes, including planning, decision-making, implementation and evaluation. Problems specific to secure facilities, probation, parole and community corrections are considered.

    CRJU 666 POLITICS, LEGISLATION AND THE MEDIA IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE (3)

    Examines the influence and process of politics on the criminal justice system, the legislative process and how legislation is enacted, and general policy-making procedures. Includes analysis of the evolution of a crime problem and how it transforms into law, policy and practice and how politics and the media influence perceptions and reactions to criminal behavior that may lead to successful legislative outcomes. Explores the design and implementation of future forecasting models, guided by law and policy, specific to the criminal justice process and offers a problem-oriented approach to effective lobbying and utilization of media resources in policy-making. prerequisite: none.

    CRJU 676 SYSTEMS AND APPLICATIONS IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE (3)

    Students diagnose and analyze real-world crime-related issues and problems in the criminal justice system. Examines decision-making techniques used in time-sensitive situations and crisis management. Offers a problem-oriented approach to effective leadership and management within the criminal justice system. prerequisite: none.

    CRJU 680 FOUNDATIONS & IMPACT OF TRAUMA (3)

    Provides the foundation for understanding trauma and post-traumatic stress disorder in adults and children; examines the impact of trauma as well as describing the short and long term effects of trauma; and explains how past trauma can lead to ongoing problem behaviors. Develops skills and increases awareness of the necessary core competencies in trauma-informed services and administration. Also, provides an understanding of the impact and manifestation of vicarious traumatization and compassion fatigue on professionals. prerequisite: none

    CRJU 682 TRAUMA INFORMED ORGANIZATIONS (3)

    Provides an understanding of how the impact of trauma can manifest behaviorally and may be elicited by normal interactions found within criminal justice system settings, and describes how to use trauma informed responses to reduce the intensity of difficult or dangerous situations. Explains how trauma informed criminal justice system responses can help to avoid re-traumatizing individuals, increase safety, and reduce future involvement in the system. Explains the benefits of capacity building among partners cross systems to link individuals to trauma-informed services and treatment as a means to increase an individual's ability to recover. prerequisite: none

    CRJU 684 RESPONDING TO TRAUMA (3)

    Provides an understanding of trauma symptoms and the needs of trauma survivors; describes approaches for engaging individuals with histories of trauma; describes client·centered communication and interviewing skills for working with trauma; examines tools to identify and screen for trauma and mental health disorders to facilitate early intervention and treatment referrals. Increases knowledge of trauma~specific services, community resources, and self·care methods for reducing symptoms of vicarious trauma and burn-out. prerequisite: none

    CRJU 685 ISSUES IN FORSENICS INVESTIGATION (3)

    Explores investigative theory and issues of forensic investigations. Examines the use of forensic science to various statutory offenses, solving crimes, and legal proceedings. Presents current issues in forensic investigations and analyzes its impact on the processing of criminal law and administration of justice. Chain of command in evidence preservation and the validity of forensic evidence in criminal proceedings are emphasized throughout the course. prerequisites: none

    CRJU 686 TRAUMA INTERVENTIONS AND BEST PRACTICES (3)

    Examines evidence-based trauma interventions and emerging areas of best practices; describes the different models and techniques currently used with different populations and discusses their effectiveness. Examines how culture and ethnicity influence the experience and effects the treatment of trauma. prerequisite: none

    CRJU 702 CONTEMPORARY ISSUES FOR VICTIMS OF CRIME (3)

    Analysis of crime and social reaction from the point of view of the offended. Focuses on the relatively recent emphasis on how crime creates problems for those victimized by criminals and analysis of whole populations victimized by persons known to them. Includes an analysis of the idea of restitution.

    CRJU 703 SEMINAR IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE (3)

    Seminar devoted to a particular topic related to research, theory and/or applications in criminal justice. Sample topics include qualitative research in criminal justice, community crime prevention and juvenile justice history. May be repeated for credit when the topic changes. no prerequisite unless listed in schedule of classes

    CRJU 704 BEST PRACTICES IN VICTIM SERVICES (3)

    Introduces the emerging field of victim services in context with the underlying legal structure of crime victims' rights. The impact of the legal structure of crime victims' rights has influenced both formal and informal responses to crime victims needs. A thorough analysis of the system of services, both with the criminal justice system and through other allied professions, is examined. Best practices in victim assistance programs-- from law enforcement through the courts and corrections systems to financial remedies, community- based advocacy, and treatment and support services- are also examined. Prerequisite: None

    CRJU 705 A DIALOGUE WITH A VICTIM (3)

    Provides a critical and in-depth review of some of the communication barriers criminal justice personnel encounter when interacting with victims and witnesses in the course of an investigation. Critically examines competing narratives (e.g., individual, professional, personal, cultural) often present when interviewing a victim/witness and how these narratives can impede communication flow and the investigative process. Explore strategies to reduce these obstacles. Prerequisite: None.

    CRJU 707 COMMUNITY CORRECTIONS (3)

    Analysis of the types, procedures, problems, theories and evaluation of supervision of adults and juveniles in the various forms of community-based corrections. Students will be responsible for understanding classic and contemporary research on this subject matter.

    CRJU 708 LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE (3)

    Integrates evolving perspectives in leadership, principles of criminal justice administration, and relevant technological innovations and applications. Studies the influence of leadership as it relates to criminal justice organizational culture, governing bodies, strategic planning, succession planning, diversity and globalization. Prerequisite: None.

    CRJU 710 ADVANCED CRIMINOLOGY: THEORY TO PRACTICE (3)

    Discusses classical and contemporary theories of criminal behavior and investigates how political, economic and social factors can cause paradigmatic shifts in how theory is both developed and applied in the real world. Students explore how theories are evaluated empirically and learn to develop and critique contemporary crime prevention and control policies by applying different theoretical models.

    CRJU 713 SEMINAR IN JUDICIAL ADMINISTRATION (3)

    Evaluation of management problems relating to courts and the role of court functions and personnel.

    CRJU 715 STUDIES/READING IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE (1 - 3)

    Designed to give the graduate student academic flexibility. Eligible for continuing studies grades. prerequisite: permission of program director

    CRJU 722 STRATEGIC AND CRISIS MANAGEMENT IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE ORGANIZATIONS (3)

    Examines strategic and crisis management methodologies and tactics employed in criminal justice organizations. Provides foundational skills and financial literacy for managing resources and personnel while managing competing priorities. Identifies conflict management and resolution strategies in justice leadership. Explores the cultural, ethical, social and political effects on organizational management. Discusses the nature and impact of external forces on criminal justice management and leadership and an understanding of the need for organizational change. Prerequisites: none

    CRJU 725 FUNDAMENTALS OF GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SCIENCE AND SYSTEMS (3)

    Provides students with foundational knowledge in both geographic information science and Systems that will allow them to better understand and think critically about the role of "place and space" and to engage in the routine use of basic GIS technology in their studies and workplace. Students will learn to use ESRl's ArcGIS to create maps and analyze geo-data and relationships, and to present their results to others. prerequisites: none.

    CRJU 730 CONTEMPORARY ISSUES IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE (3)

    Examines contemporary issues pertaining to the criminal justice system. Explores the newest research and its impact on laws, policy, and practices. Evaluates the current issues in leading and managing the various complex agencies within the criminal justice system. Prerequisites: none

    CRJU 742 MANAGING CORREC ORG (3)

    No course description available.

    CRJU 777 CAPSTONE IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE (3)

    Capstone course offers students an opportunity to demonstrate their mastery of knowledge in the fields of criminology and criminal justice, gained while working toward completion of the graduate degree. Course is designed to be an integrative experience in which students combine their knowledge of criminological theory and of justice policy with practical skills to develop a comprehensive approach to planned change. Prerequisite: CRJU 601, 602, 603, 610, 708 and 710.

    CRJU 798 CONTINUOUS ENROLLMENT (1)

    Provides continuing faculty direction, academic support services and enrollment services for students who have completed all course requirements for the degree but have not completed a thesis or final project. Students continue the independent work leading to finishing the thesis or final project that is significantly under way. Course may be repeated for credit as needed. Eligible for continuing studies (CS) grade; otherwise grading is pass/fail. prerequisite: completion of all course requirements for degree program

    CRJU 799 THESIS (3 - 6)

    Supervised preparation of an original work displaying research and writing skills. 6 hours, plus defense. Students may register for 3 hours in each of two semesters or 6 hours in one semester. Eligible for continuing studies (CS) grade; otherwise grading is pass/fail. prerequisite: permission of program director

  • FSCS: Forensic Science

    FSCS 301 FORENSIC SCIENCE (3)

    Introduces students to forensic science topics, including crime scene processing, fingerprints, firearms and toolmarks, questioned documents, serology, fire and explosives, trace evidence, pathology and instrumental analysis. Lectures, demonstrations, and basic laboratory exercises are used to present the subject matter.

    FSCS 307 CRIME SCENE INVESTIGATION (3)

    Focuses on the scientific techniques used to investigate different types of crime scenes, including burglaries, ­murders, rapes, arsons, and bombings. Students learn to recognize, identify, ­collect, preserve, transport, record, and process physical evidence such as body fluids, body fluid stains, items of trace evidence, tire and shoe impressions, latent fingerprints, weapons, and tools.

    FSCS 320 INTERVIEWS AND INTERROGATIONS (3)

    Covers the basic and specific techniques employed in criminal justice interviews and interrogations. Emphasizes processes including the interpretation of verbal and physical behavior. Considers legal issue and distinctions. Upon completion of the course, students are able to understand and conduct interviews and interrogations in a legal, ethical, efficient and professional manner. Prerequisite: none.

    FSCS 400 LABORATORY SAFETY AND QUALITY ASSURANCE (3)

    Introduces students to the various principles of safety and quality assurance in a forensic laboratory. Laboratory safety topics include OSHA standards. Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS), workplace safety, personal protective equipment, employer liability, and employee responsibilities. Quality assurance topics include quality concepts and quality assurance principles, documentation, document control, standard operating procedures, proficiency testing, validation standards, test standards, instrument calibration, instrument maintenance, auditing principles, laboratory accreditation and analyst certification. Prerequisites: Biology I, Chemistry I and II, Organic Chemistry I and II, and Physics I and II.

    FSCS 403 TRACE EVIDENCE (4)

    Focuses on the acquisition and analysis of trace materials commonly found in crime scenes. Laboratory fee required. prerequisites: Biology I, Chemistry I and II, Organic Chemistry I and II, Physics I and II, and FSCS 400 and FSCS 407 I.

    FSCS 404 ARSON INVESTIGATION AND GLASS ANALYSIS (4)

    An introduction to the theory and practice of arson investigation through use of gas chromatography and to the theory and practice of glass analysis through lab use of the GRIM III Refractive Index Measuring System. Laboratory fee required. prerequisites: Biology I, Chemistry I and II, Organic Chemistry I and II, Physics I and II and FSCS 400 and FSCS 407 8.

    FSCS 405 MICROSCOPY (4)

    Provides instruction in the methods of collecting, handling, preparing, identifying, and comparing items of trace evidence. Topics include use of the steromicroscope, compound microscope, comparison microscope, microspectrophotometer, scanning electron microscope, polarizing microscope, florescent microscope, and hot-stage microscope. These methods are demonstrated and students conduct hands-on analyses of materials using some of this equipment. Prerequisites: Biology I, Chemistry I and II, Organic Chemistry I and II, Physics I and II, and (or concurrent enrollment in) FSCS 400. Laboratory fee.

    FSCS 407 INSTRUMENTAL ANALYSIS (4)

    The use of scientific instruments in forensic testing is the focus of this course. Lectures and laboratories cover instrumentation theory, data systems, method development, and qualitative and quantitative analytical techniques. Techniques discussed include gas chromatography (GC), liquid chromatograpy (LC), thin layer chromatography (TLC), ion chromatography (IC), capillary electrophoresis (CE), infrared spectrometry (IR), mass spectrometry (MS), and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Prerequisites: Biology I, Chemistry I and II, Organic Chemistry I and II, Physics I and II, FSCS 400 and FSCS 405. Laboratory fee.

    FSCS 409 DRUG ANALYSIS (4)

    Introduces the scheduling of controlled substances and presents their analysis by crystal tests, color tests and instrumental techniques. prerequisites: Biology I, Chemistry I, and ii, Organic Chemistry i and II, Physics I and II, and FSCS 400 and FSCS 407.

    FSCS 410 FORENSIC SEROLOGY (4)

    This course is designed to expose students to both the theoretical and practical aspects of forensic serology. At the end of the course students will have gained practical experience and will have a comprehensive knowledge of techniques presently being used in the forensic examination of body fluids. Prerequisites: Biology I, Chemistry I and II, Organic Chemistry I and II, Physics I and II, FSCS 400 and FSCS 405.

    FSCS 412 FIREARMS/TOOL MARKS EXAMINATION (3)

    Firearms evidence is a major class of evidence developed in forensic related cases. The questions of identification, operability, and derived evidence are addressed and discussed. Related evidence such as tool mark evidence is also developed and explained. Prerequisite: none

    FSCS 418 MATHEMATICAL APPLICATIONS IN POLICE SCIENCE (3)

    Introduces the ­various uses and applications of mathematics in law enforcement. Students learn to interpret and construct graphs and tables, calculate clearance rates, and ­conduct trend analysis. The basics of operational research are explored relative to the needs of law enforcement. Probabilities and statistical techniques, which provide the basis for DNA interpretation, are addressed.

    FSCS 424 FOURTH AMENDMENT : INTERPRETATION AND APPLICATION (3)

    Covers the doctrines and cases inherent in and arising from the Fourth Amend­ment: the law of arrest, search and seizure, standing, forfeiture, and derivative evidence. Organized as a topical analysis, the course identifies the ­elements of each constitutional area and references major federal and state cases to illustrate the application and source of the rules.

    FSCS 426 INNOVATIVE INVESTIGATIVE TECHNIQUES (3)

    Advanced techniques and strategies designed to further aid in investigating serious or complex crimes are presented. Particular attention is paid to the procedural aspects of police activity as they relate to the admissibility of evidence in state and federal prosecutions. Content includes improvements to basic investigative skills and a discussion of alternative tactics. Also covered are the necessary, suggested, and explicit requirements for a federal Title III investigation and a Maryland wiretap investigation.

    FSCS 440 ADVANCED CRIME SCENE INVESTIGATION (3)

    The protection and analysis of a crime scene is a complex procedure. Information is obtained by utilizing ever increasing skills and technology. The skills involve the use of improved casting techniques, enhanced latent fingerprinting techniques and sophisticated new photographic techniques. This course introduces the student to these techniques. Lab Fee. Prerequisite: FSCS 307-Crime Scene Investigation

    FSCS 454 DEATH INVESTIGATION (3)

    Presents the medical and legal investigation of death. The history and development of forensic pathology are considered. The course examines the manners of death, including, homicide, suicide, accidental, natural and undetermined. The course is organized in a lecture series format. Lecture topics include sharp and blunt force trauma, thermal injuries, drowning, drug and alcohol abuse, pediatric forensics, gunshot injuries, asphyxia and motor vehicle trauma.

    FSCS 455 HOMICIDE INVESTIGATION (3)

    Analysis of homicide investigation from the viewpoint of the homicide detective exploring the legal issues and the practical use of interviews, interrogations, and medical and trace forensic evidence. prerequisite: None

    FSCS 456 CHEMISTRY OF DEATH (3)

    Explores the fate of the human body at the time of death to the decomposition of the body into the lithosphere. Study considers biochemical and physical process involved in taphonomy. prerequisites: none

    FSCS 460 FORENSIC PHOTOGRAPHY (3)

    Familiarizes students with, and provides basic understanding of, the camera (34mm, digital and video) with respect to crime scene analysis. Using photographic techniques, students will learn how to document a crime scene and pertinent physical evidence including tire impressions, shoe prints, latent prints and blood spatter. In addition, students wil explore available light, flash, flash fill and painting-by-light processes. Students will learn how to construct and maintain a photographic log and how to enter photographs into court as evidence. Students will create a portfolio of their work. Laboratory fee required.

    FSCS 462 INTRODUCTION TO DOCUMENT EXAMINATION (3)

    Focuses on the origins and styles of writing and materials used in writing and in the formation of documents. prerequisite: permission of the program director.

    FSCS 464 HANDWRITING ANALYSIS (3)

    Introduction to the study of hand writing analysis as relevant to the forensic analysis of documents. prerequisite: permission of program director.

    FSCS 466 INSTRUMENTAL ANALYSIS IN DOCUMENT EXAMINATION (4)

    Practical experience in using instrumental techniques to examine documents by spectral imaging and impression analysis. Laboratory fee required. prerequites: FSCS 462, FSCS 464 and permission of the program director.

    FSCS 480 FORENSIC DOCUMENTATION (3)

    Prepares students to document and ­manage cases properly from inception to successful conclusion. Students gain a basic understanding of investigative and forensic case documentation.

    FSCS 482 MOOT COURT AND TRIAL ADVOCACY FOR FORENSICS (3)

    Students learn courtroom presentation techniques designed to elicit direct, persuasive, and comprehensive testimony as it relates to various evidentiary issues at criminal hearings and trials. Students prepare and present direct testimony and are cross-examined by attorneys in a simulated courtroom setting.

    FSCS 484 ART AND FORENSICS (3)

    An introduction to various styles of art and their analysis using forensic techniques. Security, storage and exhibition are examined. Laboratory fee required. Prerequisite: none

    FSCS 487 FIELD INTERNSHIP IN FORENSIC SCIENCE (3)

    Provides field experience to students through laboratory assignments with various criminal justice entities. This requirement is completed at the end of the program. Eligible for continuing studies grade.

    FSCS 493 HONORS SEMINAR (3)

    An advanced interdisciplinary seminar that focuses on important books and issues and encourages independent thinking, clear presentation and an understanding of the concerns and methods of various disciplines. The course may be team taught; topic and instructor(s} may change from semester to semester. Course may be repeated for credit when topic changes. Prerequisites; 3.5 GPA and permission of both the Denit Honors Program director

    FSCS 494 HONORS PROJECT (3 - 6)

    Directed indiv\dua\ instructioo in an advanced prQjec\ of ina student's choice; ihe prQject must be academically related to this discipline. Each student works closely with afaculty director who guides hislher progress. The project must be of honors qualit1 and must be 'fina\\y approved by both the fatuity director and asecond facult1 member. Course is eligible for a continuing studies grade. Prerequisites: Honors standing. 3.5 GPA and permission of both the Denit Honors Program director and the faculty director

    FSCS 496 FIELD INTERNSHIP IN POLICE SCIENCE (3)

    Broadens the educational experience of students through appropriate observational and work assignments with criminal investigation units. This requirement is completed at the end of the program. Eligible for continuing studies grade.

    FSCS 497 TOPICS IN FORENSICS (3)

    Examines special topics and issues in the field of forensics such as homicide investigation, blood spatter analysis, and forensic medicine and public health. Course may be repeated for credit when the topic changes.

    FSCS 498 LABORATORY TOPICS IN FORENSICS (4)

    This course will cover special laboratory topics and issues in the field of forensics such as DNA analysis, questioned document examination, and drug analysis. FSCS 498 may be repeated for credit when the topic changes. No prerequisite unless listed in the schedule of classes.

    FSCS 499 DIRECTED INDEPENDENT STUDY (1 - 6)

    No course description available.

    FSCS 600 LEGAL ISSUES IN FINANCIAL CRIMES (3)

    Examines the general regulations, general laws, and ethics and business policies associated with financial crimes. Areas of major focus include legal issues facing management and administration, traditional search and seizure as well as privacy issues, manager and supervisor responsibilities, criminal issues and definitions, chain of custody and ethical considerations. This problem-oriented course focuses on applying the holdings of cases and analyses of statutes to different criminal fact patterns. Prerequisite: None

    FSCS 601 LEGAL ISSUES IN HIGH TECHNOLOGY CRIME (3)

    Examines the general regulations, general and computer-related law, and ethics and business policies associated with high technology crime. Areas of major focus include description of legal issues facing management and administration, traditional search and seizure as well as privacy issues, manager and supervisor responsibilities, criminal issues and definitions, chain of custody and ethical considerations. Problem-oriented course that focuses on applying the holdings of cases and analyses of statutes to different criminal fact patterns. Prerequisites: None

    FSCS 602 MONEY LAUNDERING (3)

    An essential element of financial crimes is the ability to move assets in ways that resist detection. Explores frequently used techniques, reviews national and international laws and practices to prevent money laundering, and describes best practices to minimize the ability to use money laundering as part of financial crimes. Prerequisite: None.

    FSCS 610 INDENTIFYING ORGANIZATIONAL LIABILITIES AND CRIME (3)

    Defines problems, logic and theory, research protocols, personal and organizational risks, criminal and civil liabilities, physical security issues, due diligence matters, environmental concerns and sexual harassment issues. Covers responsibilities of the organization and of the individual. Prerequisites: FSCS 601

    FSCS 615 INFORMATION RETRIEVAL : PAPER AND ELECTRONIC (3)

    Explores gathering of information and data, evidence collection, storage and security of records, personnel records and related issues, privacy issues, security of customer information, duties and obligations of the information technology field. Also focuses on legal access to these records. Prerequisite: FSCS 601. Lab Fee

    FSCS 620 FORENSIC INVESTIGATIVE TECHNIQUE I (3)

    Focuses on traditional investigative techniques (interviews and interrogations), simple data collection, physical evidence, fraud detection, data acquisition and computer techniques, reverse engineering, and industrial espionage. Also, examines administrative process, the role of human resources and accounting, organizational processes and structures, and chain of command / management. Intended as an introduction to FSCS 720. Prererequisite: FSCS 601. Lab fee.

    FSCS 630 INTRODUCTION TO CRYPTOGRAPHY (3)

    Provides the historical basis for ciphers and encryption techniques and examines the use of codes and decryption techniques in government and commercial applications. Reviews the responsibilities of a Security Analyst, including recognizing breaches of security, controlling further risk, and identifying methods for gathering forensic evidence. prerequisite: none. Lab Fee

    FSCS 635 IMAGE ANALYSIS (3)

    Examines the effective manipulation of digital images from digital photographs and videotapes. Discusses identification of authenticity and detection of manipulation in addition to detection of fraud and other criminal activity in these digital media. Prerequisite: FSCS 630 Lab Fee.

    FSCS 640 STEGANOGRAPHY (3)

    Steganography is a process by which information is hidden within other media. Presents tools (software) to detect such hidden information, including files, images, network traffic, disks, etc., that masquerade within any system. Also presents the processes of hiding or encrypting data to inhibit a forensic analysis and of the detection and counter-resolution of hidden information. Prerequisite: FSCS 630 and FSCS 635. Lab Fee.

    FSCS 685 ISSUES IN FORENSIC INVESTIGATIONS (3)

    Explores investigative theory and issues of forensic investigations. Examines the use of forensic science to various statutory offenses, solving crimes, and legal proceedings. Presents current issues in forensic investigations and analyzes its impact on the processing of criminal law and administration of justice. Chain of command in evidence preservation and the validity of forensic evidence in criminal proceedings are emphasized throughout the course. prerequisite: none

    FSCS 720 FORENSIC INVESTIGATIVE TECHNIQUES II (3)

    A continuation of FSCS 620 with special attention to computer systems and network systems. Lab Fee required. Prerequisite: FSCS 601 and FSCS 620

    FSCS 724 PROTECTION OF DATA / INFORMATION (3)

    Examines prevention of data / information loss by theft, intrusion, and natural disaster and assessment of vulnerabilities and their remediation. Also presents protocols for security and for effective data storage and examines assessment of risk. Prerequisite: FSCS 615. Lab Fee.

    FSCS 727 COMPUTER AND DIGITAL FORENSICS (3)

    Examines the use of specialized techniques for recovery, authentication, and analysis of electronic data; reconstruction of computer usage; examination of residual data; and authentication of remaining data. Also, examines the effective manipulation of digital images from digital photographs and videotapes. Discusses identifjcation of authenticity and detection of manipulation in addition to detection of fraud and other criminal activity in these digital media. Lab fee required. Prerequisite FSCS 615.

    FSCS 728 INFORMATION SYSTEMS, THREATS, ATTACKS, AND DEFENSE STRATEGIES (3)

    Examines information systems and the threats from malicious activities that attempt to collect data from or disrupt, deny or destroy information within a system. Explores origins of such attacks and effective responses to threat. Also, examines the process of Steganography by which information is hidden within other media. Presents tools (software) to detect such hidden information, including files, images, network traffic, disks, etc., that masquerade within any system. Also presents the processes of hiding or encrypting data to inhibit a forensic analysis and the detection and counter-resolution of hidden information. Lab fee required. prerequisite: FSCS 615 and FSCS 727,

    FSCS 730 INCIDENT RESPONSE (3)

    Explores the development of effective responses to active attacks on computer systems and networks, coupled with analysis of the breakdown of protective measures. Prerequisite FSCS 724

    FSCS 740 GRADUATE INTERNSHIP (3)

    Provides field experience to students through laboratory assignments with various forensic or criminal justice entities. Course is completed at the end of the program and requires submission of a journal and a research paper. Eligible for continuing studies grade. Prerequisite: Successful completion of all foundation courses in MSFS degree program and permission of program director.

    FSCS 750 CAPSTONE COURSE (3)

    Capstone course requires students to integrate and apply knowledge, theories, principles, skills and practical applications learned in Master of Science in Forensic Science- High Technology Crime core courses to actual high technology case scenarios. prerequisite: successful completion of all core courses in M.S. in Forensic Science program and permission of program director.

    FSCS 753 COMPUTER AND DIGITAL SECURITY MANAGEMENT (3)

    A study of the management of networks, types and sources of threats and vulnerabilities, risk management, firewalls and other security issues. Prerequisite: FSCS 615, 727, and 728. Lab Fee.

  • GAHS: Global Affairs/Human Security

    GAHS 504 SEMINAR IN GLOBALIZATION AND SOCIAL CHANGE (3)

    Beginning with an examination of the traditional way of thinking about international relations, this course examines global changes over the past half-century and examines the driving forces of globalization: trade, finance, technology and population growth. The course also explores the impact of globalization on political authority, on conflict between states and groups, on economic and personal well-being and on environmental sustainability. Particular attention is paid to the impact of globalization on state, local and national administrative agencies.

    GAHS 508 INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATION (3)

    Looks broadly at the structure and function of international organization and the pursuit of human security. The course examines a variety of formal institutions, such as the United Nations and its ancillary organizations, the European community and the World Trade Organization, as well as less formal nongovernmental institutions. It also explores international law as a form of organization in addition to international regimes; the implicit norms, rules and processes around which the expectations of global actors converge; and the impact of this complex network of organization via a focus on elements of human security.

    GAHS 600 MANAGING NGOs (3)

    Provides an overview of the nongovernmental sector, nongovernmental organization creation and management of NGOs. The course covers how to create and manage an NGO, the legal requirements for creating an NGO, the roles and responsibilities of members of the board of directors in governing an NGO, managing staff and volunteers, fundraising, income generation possibilities and required reporting.

    GAHS 605 NEW APPROCHES TO ECONOMIC AND SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT (3)

    Critically examines innovative and effective strategies for addressing a variety of social, economic, demographic, urban, ecological and institutional issues in selected nations in Asia, Africa, Latin America and the islands of the Atlantic and Pacific oceans. The course reviews the varied working definitions of "development" using multiple case studies drawn from the work of the World Bank, the Asian and African development banks, the Inter-American Development Bank; the work of Muhammad Yunus and the Grameen Bank; the work of multilateral organizations like the United Nations Development Programme and of a variety of nongovernmental organizations, such as the Institute of International Education, the Academy for Educational Development, the Worldwatch Institute and others. Theories of political economy and local community development are also examined and critiqued.

    GAHS 610 INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT (3)

    Explores the theories, policies and practice of development assistance. As such, the course will enable students to develop their understanding of problems in the field of international development and examine mechanisms for how policies can aid and hinder development in practice. prerequisite: none

    GAHS 740 SEMINAR IN HUMAN SECURITY (3)

    Highly interactive, graduate-level seminar that examines the evolution of human security as a concept distinct from national security and that explores how transnational actors—from global elites to NGOs, intergovernmental organizations to supranational bodies—work together to promote good governance, sustainable development and human well-being. The course pays particular attention to contemporary issues in human security and uses case studies to familiarize students with theories, concepts and ideas as well as their application in the modern world. prerequisite: 24 credits in the M.S. in Global Affairs and Human Security program or permission of the program director

    GAHS 760 LEADERSHIP/ FIELD PLACEMENT SEMINAR (3)

    Graduate-level seminar intended to provide an opportunity to students to integrate learning from their internship/ field placement with course themes and concepts studied in the Global Affairs and Human Security program. prerequisite: permission of the program director

  • GVPP: Government/Public Policy

    GVPP 201 AMERICAN GOVERNMENT (3)

    This course is the basic American government course required of all government and Public Policy majors. This is an introduction to American ideology, government, and politics. The course also serves as a basic social science course available as a general elective for all undergraduate majors. Prerequisite: None. [GIK] [QQT] [SBS]

    GVPP 210 INTRODUCTION TO INTERNATIONAL STUDIES (3)

    Introduces concepts within international studies. Students learn how history, geography, culture, politics and economics affect the approach taken by various actors in international relations. Through critical analysis, this course examines the role world politics plays in a variety of global issues and challenges. [QQT] [SBS]

    GVPP 279 SPECIAL TOPICS IN INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS (3)

    Exploration of topics in international affairs. Content varies depending upon the interests of faculty and students and may include studies in comparative or regional politics, international or global issues, or issues in foreign policy. Course may be repeated when topic changes. Prerequisite: Depends on course topic and level of difficulty.

    GVPP 284 POLITICS IN COMPARATIVE PERSPECTIVE (3)

    Politics in Comparative Perspective is designed to introduce students to the study of politics and Political Science. The course covers basic concepts in Comparative Politics including ideologies, political behavior, and political institutions. These concepts are used to explore the political experiences of representative countries from the Westem Democratic, Transitional, and Developing worlds. Coverage is also given to the impact of globalization on selected countries. Specific countries covered will vary with instructor. Prerequisites: None [GIK] [QQT] [SBS]

    GVPP 297 TOPICS IN POLITICS AND POLICY (3)

    Exploration of topics in Politics and Policy. The actual topic of the course will appear in the schedule of classes. Prerequisite; Depends on course topic and level of difficulty.

    GVPP 300 AMERICAN POLITICAL INSTITUTIONS (3)

    The role and interrelationship of the federal, state, and local governments in the formulation and implementation of public policy are examined. Major contemporary issues are explored to illustrate the policy making process. The specific policy issues studied vary from semester to semester.

    GVPP 315 PUBLIC POLICY ANALYSIS (3)

    Students will gain afoundation in policy analysis -the process of creating, critically assessing. and communicating information to determine which of various policy alternatives will best achieve agiven goal(s) within the American policy arena. Students will understand the policy process and analysis by: Defining, Assessing, and describing public problems; Identifying policy goals and criteria to assess possible strategies; Crafting appropriate policy options by borrowing, adapting, and creating; Analyzing and predicting the effects of alternative policy options; and Communicating policy advice in written and oral presentations. Prerequisites: None.

    GVPP 320 PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION (3)

    The problems of municipal, state, and federal governments as these relate to organization, budgeting, personnel, welfare, control, reporting, public relations, federal-state-local relations, the city ­government in society, and the division of state and federal powers.

    GVPP 321 LEADERSHIP: AN EXPERIENTIAL APPROACH (3)

    Organized around developing leadership, this course will help students to identify goals and objectives and achieve them. This course will use adventure education and outdoor experience to support the development of personal and professional competencies for individuals interested in careers in community -serving nonprofit organizations.

    GVPP 322 BUREAUCRACY AND PUBLIC POLICY (3)

    An understanding of the institutional political, legal, and ethical challenges of public policy management in the contemporary administrative state

    GVPP 324 AMERICAN PUBLIC POLICY (3)

    Analysis of the formulation and implementation of governmental policies at all levels in such policy areas as art and cultural policy, economic stability, income maintenance, education, the environment, public finance, and older adult policy. Prerequisite: GVPP 300 or permission of instructor.

    GVPP 326 URBAN POLITICS AND PUBLIC POLICY (3)

    An examination of the ­organization and main functions of urban government, the major participants and key issues in the urban political process, and the political relationship between cities and other levels of government. The distinctive characteristics of the political process in the urban setting with special emphasis on Baltimore.

    GVPP 340 CONSTITUTIONAL LAW (3)

    The role of the Constitution in the American system of government. Origins and historical development of the Constitution, the theory and operation of the federal court, and the effects of Supreme Court decisions on the relationship between ­different branches of government and on the rights of individuals in American society.

    GVPP 341 CIVIL LIBERTIES AND THE BILL OF RIGHTS (3)

    An advanced course about constitutional law that focuses on the Bill of Rights and issues of civil liberties that have arisen as the Supreme Court has changed its interpretation of the Constitutional basis of decisions related to those rights. The course stresses legal reasoning and research skills; it also provides information about Constitutional issues in relation to American governmental processes and policies. Suggested prerequisite: GVPP 340.

    GVPP 344 AMERICAN PRESIDENCY (3)

    An examination of the presidency in the American system of government. The powers of and limits on the president are studied as are the relationships between the president and other major actors in the political system.

    GVPP 345 THE LEGISLATIVE PROCESS (3)

    An examination of legislatures in the American system of government. Emphasis is placed on the study of the representative function of legislatures, of the ways in which they operate, and their impact on public policy.

    GVPP 348 STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENT (3)

    Emphasis on the organi­zation, powers, and functions of state, local, county, and municipal ­governments. Government in theory and practice at different levels in the state of Maryland.

    GVPP 360 PARTIES, CAMPAIGNS, AND ELECTIONS (3)

    A study of the rise, history, and functions of political parties in the United States. Campaign management and strategies as well as electoral tactics and movements are also examined.

    GVPP 362 MEDIA AND GOVERNMENT (3)

    A study of relationships among governments, public opinion, and the media. Analysis of the components of public opinion and their individual and collective influence on government. The functioning of the media and their influence on both government and public opinion.

    GVPP 381 AMERICAN POL ITICAL THOUGHT (3)

    A study of the political thought in the United States that has provided the foundations of American democracy from colonial times to the present, ­focusing on political concepts, principles, ideas, and issues.

    GVPP 382 POLITICAL IDEOLOGIES (3)

    Focuses on the philosophical and ideological bases for the state. The political ­economy and social structure of governing ideologies are examined and illustrated in discussions about democracy, capitalism, liberalism, fascism, communism, and socialism. Challenges to these ideologies as presented by religion and nationalism are also discussed.

    GVPP 384 COMPARATIVE GOVERNMENT (3)

    An examination of the historical and social background, political process, governments, and institutions of representative foreign governments, including Great Britain, France, and Germany. The identification, comparison, and ­evaluation of the main components and characteristics of the governing process are examined

    GVPP 385 THEORIES OF INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS (3)

    A survey course of global events and processes. This course covers issues of war and peace, arms and armaments, international governmental and non-governmental organizations, the politics of global economic relations both amongst nations of the developed north and between northern and southern states. Humanitarian and environmental issues will also be covered. Emerging trends in globalization, terrorism, and ethnic conflict will be considered. prerequisite: GVPP210 strongly recommended

    GVPP 386 AMERICAN FOREIGN POLICY (3)

    An examination of the political, economic, and military considerations involved in the formulation and implementation of United States foreign policy. Included are the constitutional responsibilities for foreign policy, the economic context, ­military doctrine and the country’s ­traditional international relationships.

    GVPP 408 METHODS IN GOVERNMENT AND PUBLIC POLICY (3)

    Focuses on research and analytical techniques, ­statistical measurement, and methods of science used in the study of governmental organizations, elections, political behavior, and policy analysis.

    GVPP 410 POLITICS AND RACE (3)

    Addresses race and its problems,possibilities, and limitations. Race is a critical issue in society, and despite the removal of legal barriers and the guarantee of equal protection (Civil Rights Act of 1964, Voting Rights Act of 1965 and the Fair Housing Act of 1968), blacks and Hispanics continue to endure negative outcomes, and racism and discrimination in education, employment, health, income and incarceration remain a part of the American social fabric. Prerequisite: none

    GVPP 423 PUBLIC BUDGETING AND PERSONNEL ADMINISTRATION (3)

    Focuses on budgeting and personnel administration at the national, state and local government levels. Examined are the form, content, and processes of public budget development, and its review, execution, and management; also examined are the principles and functions of public personnel management, salary, schedules, unions, performance evaluation, and retirement. Prerequisite: GVPP 320 or permission of the instructor.

    GVPP 425 ADMINISTRATIVE LAW AND PROCESSES (3)

    The growth of the administrative process in the United States, the necessity for the delegation of legislative authority to administrative agencies, and the need for judicial control of the bureaucracy. Emphasis on federal, as well as State of Maryland, administrative and regulatory processes.

    GVPP 426 FOUNDATIONS OF DEMOCRACY I (3)

    This course examines the scope and nature of the fundamental values that are reflected in our system of democratic governance. Democracy joins individual citizens, neighbors and communities. Acting together they form the essence of an associational life-- that is to say, a life lived with reciprocal linkages to the well-being of others and to the common good. Particular attention will be placed on the decision making and organizational design systems that characterize our social, political and economic institutions, as well as community-serving nonprofits.

    GVPP 461 MARYLAND GOVERNMENT PROCESSES AND POLITICS (3)

    A study of the structure of Maryland’s three branches of government and their ­relationship to interest groups, political parties, and public policies.

    GVPP 463 INTEREST GROUP POLITICS AND LOBBYING (3)

    Examined within this course are interest groups as key components in the functioning of a pluralistic political system. The proliferation of interests from trade associations to the public, nonprofit interests will be documented. Also explored are the techniques of lobbying.

    GVPP 470 INDIVIDUAL RESEARCH (1 - 3)

    Individual research on a ­subject of mutual interest to both student and supervisory faculty. Depending on the scope and depth of research, from one to three credits may be earned for the successful completion of this course. The student may, upon approval, take up to two such courses. Prerequisite: A minimum of 12 credit hours in political science courses earned at the University of Baltimore and approval of the program director. This course may be taken for a continuing studies (CS) grade.

    GVPP 471 INDIVIDUAL RESEARCH (1 - 3)

    Individual research on a ­subject of mutual interest to both student and supervisory faculty. Depending on the scope and depth of research, from one to three credits may be earned for the successful completion of this course. The student may, upon approval, take up to two such courses. Prerequisite: A minimum of 12 credit hours in political science courses earned at the University of Baltimore and approval of the program director. This course may be taken for a continuing studies (CS) grade.

    GVPP 479 SPECIAL TOPICS IN INTERNATIONAL STUDIES (3)

    Selected topics in International Relations and/or Comparative Politics of mutual interest to faculty and students are examined in depth. Content varies according to the concurrent interests of faculty and students. The topic for study will appear under that name in the Schedule of Classes. Course may be repeated for credit when topic changes. Prerequisites: None

    GVPP 480 ENVIRONMENTAL POLITICS AND POLICY (3)

    Environmental politics and policy focuses on the process of public decision making as it relates to national and global environmental issues. The course will address policy making institutions and political behavior and how these have shaped American responses to such issues as clean air and water, energy use, and natural resource consumption, among others. The course will explore how agencies use risk assessment and other decision tools to establish regulatory objectives and how tax, regulatory and other policy tools are used to mange the environment. Prerequisites: None

    GVPP 481 GLOBALIZATION (3)

    This course is an examination of the rapid global changes shepherding in the 21 st Century. Students examine the social, economic and political effects of a smaller, more connected world. Global citizenship, intertwined economies, and global institutions joining nation-states as primary global actors are presented as macro-changes to national identities,economies and public policies. Prerequisites: None

    GVPP 482 TOPICS IN POLITICAL THEORY (3)

    Selected political theory examines perennial issues in political thought within the frameworks of classical, medieval, renaissance, enlightenment, and modern political theory. Course may be repeated for credit when topic changes.

    GVPP 484 INTERNATIONAL POLITICAL ECONOMY (3)

    Examination of the rapid changes in the postwar system of trade, production and finance. Students are exposed to discussions concerning the impact that these changes have presented to national identities and the public ­policy responses undertaken by states to maintain and enhance their position in the global trading system

    GVPP 485 THE FAR EAST IN WORLD AFFAIRS (3)

    Political, economic, and ­military aspects of India, Japan and Southeast Asia. Emphasis upon their ­contemporary foreign relations.

    GVPP 486 THE MIDDLE EAST (3)

    Political, economic, and military aspects of Turkey, Iran, Egypt, and the other Arab states, Israel, and the eastern Mediterranean. Emphasis on foreign ­relations. The interrelationship of these powers and their relationships with Western European powers, Russia, the People’s Republic of China, and the United States.

    GVPP 487 WESTERN EUROPE (3)

    Political, economic, and military aspects of Austria, the Benelux countries, France, Italy, and Germany. Emphasis upon their contemporary foreign relations

    GVPP 488 THE COMMONWEALTH OF INDEPENDENT STATES & CHINA IN WORLD AFFAIRS (3)

    International relations of the Commonwealth of Independent States and the People’s Republic of China. An example of the political, ­economic, and military considerations of these two countries in the conduct of their relationships.

    GVPP 489 INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATION (3)

    The Study of the development and evolution of International Organizations including the United Nations, regional and functional organizations, and non-governmental organizations. Course focuses on the United Nation's principal organs and specialized agencies and on major International Inter-governmental organizations. Consideration is also given to non-governmental organization as we" as informal organization. Simulation or role playing exercises or trips to the United Nations may be included at the instructor's discretion. Prerequistes: GVPP 210 or CNCM 102

    GVPP 490 INTERNSHIP (3)

    Internship designed to broaden the ­educational experience of the student through work assignments with appropriate governmental agencies. Depending upon the academic value of the work assignments, the student may enroll for up to a total of six credits in this internship. Prerequisites: major in government and public policy or jurisprudence, minimum of 12 credits completed in GVPP courses with a GPA of at least 3.0, and approval of the program director. This course may be taken for a continuing ­studies (CS) grade.

    GVPP 491 INTERNSHIP II (3)

    Internship designed to broaden the ­educational experience of the student through work assignments with appropriate governmental agencies. Depending upon the academic value of the work assignments, the student may enroll for up to a total of six credits in this internship. Prerequisites: major in government and public policy or jurisprudence, minimum of 12 credits completed in GVPP courses with a GPA of at least 3.0, and approval of the program director. This course may be taken for a continuing ­studies (CS) grade.

    GVPP 493 HONORS SEMINAR (3)

    An advanced interdisciplinary seminar that focuses on important books and issues, encourages independent thinking, clear presentation, and an understanding of the concerns and methods of various disciplines. The course may be team taught; topic and instructor(s) may change from semester to semester. Course may be repeated for credit when topic changes. Prerequisites: 3.3 GPA and permission of the Honors Director.

    GVPP 494 HONORS PROJECT (3 - 6)

    Directed individual instruction in an advanced project of the student’s choice; the project must be academically related to this discipline. Each student works closely with a faculty director who guides his/her progress. The project must be of honors quality and must be finally approved by both the faculty director and a second faculty member. Course is eligible for a continuing studies grade. prerequisites: 3.3 GPA and permission of both the Denit Honors Program director and the faculty director.

    GVPP 497 TOPICS IN GOVERNMENT AND PUBLIC POLICY (3)

    Intensive exploration of topics in political science of mutual interest to faculty and students. Content varies according to the concurrent interests of faculty and students. The topic for study will appear under that name in the Class Schedule.

    GVPP 499 SENIOR SEMINAR (3)

    A ­senior-level seminar required of all ­government and public policy majors. Topics considered include the perspectives of the major sub-fields of government and public policy and their relations with other disciplines. Students demonstrate their abilities to analyze, assess, and write about relevant issues and practices in government and public administration. Open to non-government and public policy majors only by permission of the instructor.

  • HSMG: Health Systems Management

    HSMG 300 HEALTH INDICATORS (3)

    A basic introduction to classical approaches typically used to describe population health. Emphasizes appropriate summaries and methods of health utilization data display in tables and in graphs. Use of rates, ratios and proportions are addressed. Introduces basic data management, exploratory data analysis and report generation. Students gain hands-on experience in use of computer applications such as spreadsheets, statistical packages and data base management while becoming acquainted with useful health data sources. (Recommended EXCEL workshop) (Required for Cohort 12).

    HSMG 301 INTRODUCTION TO HEALTH ECONOMICS (3)

    This is a survey course of the major topics in health economics. The student should develop an appreciation of the contribution economics makes to the study of health and health policy. Topics to be covered include the demand for health and healthcare, workforce issues, and the organization and financing of the US healthcare system.

    HSMG 302 STATISTICS FOR HEALTH MANAGEMENT (3)

    An introduction to the purposes and practices of statistical analysis in the health management sector. Students evaluate data analysis as presented in health management literature. Students also learn to distinguish between information based upon speculation, intuition and wishful thinking and that based upon systematic analysis of data. prerequisite: none

    HSMG 303 HEALTH FINANCE (3)

    Offer a current approach to the fundamentals of budgeting and financial management with an emphasis on health-care organizations. prerequisites: none

    HSMG 370 OVERVIEW OF HEALTH CARE DELIVERY SYSTEM (3)

    Provides a systematic overview of the U.S. health services system in order to familiarize the student with various mechanisms through which health services are ­delivered. Systems approach assists ­students in studying details of the ­various topics while maintaining a broad perspective of health care delivery. (Required for Cohort 12)

    HSMG 371 PRINCIPLES OF HEALTH CARE MANAGEMENT I (3)

    Provides an understanding of the conceptual foundations and practices of management within health services organizations. Presents an overview of the structure, operation and management of health services organizations is presented. Perspectives from organizational theory and general management provide a conceptual basis for understanding and analyzing the practice of management in health service organizations. Uses the case study approach to develop management skills through the analysis of health care industry examples.

    HSMG 372 PRINCIPLES OF HEALTH CARE MANAGEMENT II (3)

    Provides an understanding of the conceptual foundations and practices of management within health services organizations. Perspectives from organizational theory and general management provide a conceptual basis for understanding and analyzing the practice of management in health care organizations. Uses case study approach is used to develop management skills through the analysis of health care industry examples. Examines principles of management in health service organizations, specifically focusing on health professional accreditation, licensure, personnel issues, labor relations and select issues in material handling particular to health services organizations. Prerequisites: HSMG 371.

    HSMG 373 HEALTH POLICY AND POLITICS (3)

    An in-depth study of a number of ­current policy issues in the American health care system. Particular attention is paid to the roles and powers of non-medical participants, including consumers, planners, administrators, and policy makers. (Prerequisite HSMG 370 & recommended 371 & 372) (Required for Cohort 12)

    HSMG 376 Quantitative Methods for Healthcare Managers (3)

    Provides quantitative tools and skills that apply to the decision-making and control systems in the practice of health systems management. This is the second of two sequenced courses designed to develop quantitative competencies. This course builds on the first course to develop systems-based spreadsheet modeling competencies that include good spreadsheet modeling practices, forecasting, facility layout, quality control, project management and inventory methods. prerequisite: satisfactory completion of HSMG 302

    HSMG 378 INTRODUCTION TO GLOBAL HEALTH (3)

    This course provides an introduction to important global health issues, including health determinants and key areas of disease burden, and the role that new health technologies can play in solving these problems. Students will examine case studies of successful global health interventions to understand features of successful programs. Working in small groups, students will use their knowledge to design a solution to a real world health challenge facing a developing country. Prerequisites: None

    HSMG 379 HEALTH INFORMATION SYSTEMS (3)

    This course provides future healthcare managers with an overview of health information systems. Students will gain an understanding the selection and use of information systems and review applications of information technology in healthcare. The course will review the current trends in information technology and describe how information systems can support high-quality patient care. Pre-requisite: None

    HSMG 470 INDIVIDUAL RESEARCH (3)

    Individual research on an academically sound project of interest in the health systems management field. Research is to be conducted inconsultation with a monitoring faculty member. prerequisite: permission of the program director.

    HSMG 471 SPECIAL TOPICS IN HEALTH SYSTEMS MANAGEMENT (3)

    This course will cover specific topics, issues and trends in health management. Prerequisite: None

    HSMG 472 Introduction to Quality Performance and Improvement in Healthcare (3)

    This course offers an introduction to quality improvement and patient safety theories, models, methods and tools and their application to management in health care settings. This course focuses on the application of change processes that are critical to improving health quality by integrating theory and implementation. Specific content areas include the role of systems assessment and measurement as being fundamental to quality improvement. The student will explore the current forces driving the push toward quality outcomes and accountability at all levels and settings of healthcare, while focusing on the philosophy of continuous improvement through team work and collaboration.

    HSMG 477 HEALTH CARE LAW AND RISK MANAGEMENT (3)

    A study of the major legal issues encountered in the health care field by administrators and practitioners. Topics include issues of health care need, cost and quality control, Medicare and Medicaid, access to health care, the business roles of health institutions, health care contracts and claims, right to treatment, and federal health plans vs. private health coverage. (Prerequisite HSMG 370) (Recommended for Cohort 10, 11).

    HSMG 490 SURVEY RESEARCH AND DATA ANALYSIS FOR HEALTH SVCS ADMINISTRATION (3)

    This hands-on course provides an overview of typical data analysis methods used in the health services setting, with an emphasis on surveys, including statistical analysis used for health management decision-making. Reviews typical graphical displays of data used in quality assurance programs.Basic PC applications necessary for health managers such as spreadsheets and databases are introduced. Prerequisite: APST 308 or equivalent, EXCEL workshop SPSS(Recommended for Cohort 8)

    HSMG 491 HEALTH PLANNING AND PROGRAM EVALUATION (3)

    Enriches students' understanding of the complexity of the planning and evaluation processes used by health-care organizations. Covers theoretical and historical foundations of health planning, the relationship between health planning and regulation and the application of planning methods. Also presents various planning and evaluation models and techniques necessary to equip students with practical evaluation and planning skills.

    HSMG 492 INTERNSHIP (3)

    The internship serves as a bridge between theory and practice. Students apply their knowledge and acquire insights into the management of health service organizations. This practicum offers-opportunities for observation, participation, and applying administrative skills in the institutional setting. prerequisite: At least 12 credits HSMG including HSMG 371 and HSMG 372.

    HSMG 493 HONORS SEMINAR (3)

    An ¬advanced interdisciplinary seminar that ¬focuses on important books and issues and encourages independent thinking, clear presentation and an understanding of the concerns and methods of various disciplines. The course may be team taught; topic and instructor(s) may change from semester to semester. Course may be repeated for credit when topic changes. prerequisites: 3.3 GPA and permission of the Denit Honors program director

    HSMG 494 HONORS PROJECT (3 - 6)

    Directed individual instruction in an advanced project of the student’s choice; the project must be academically related to this discipline. Each student works closely with a faculty director who guides his/her progress. The project must be of honors quality and must be finally approved by both the faculty director and a second faculty member. Course is eligible for a CS grade. Prerequisite: Honors standing, a 3.5 gpa. and permission of both the Honors Program Director and the faculty director.

    HSMG 498 STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT IN HEALTH CARE (3)

    Examines strategic management in health care organizations. Includes discussions of the nature of strategic management, the environment of health organizations and methods of formulating, implementing and controlling the strategic management of health care delivery. (Capstone (Final) course) Prerequisite: Successful completion (C grade or better) of HSMG 300, HSMG 301, HSMG 370 and HSMG 371, or Permission of the HSMG Director.

    HSMG 630 THE LEGAL ENVIRONMENT OF HEALTH CARE MANAGEMENT (3)

    Provides a framework for understanding the legal implications of advancing medical technologies and of new forms for health-services financing and delivery systems.

    HSMG 632 Quantitative Tools for Health Systems Management I (3)

    Provides a broad overview of biostatistical methods, concepts and reasoning as applied to decisions in health systems management. Pre-Req: Certification of intermediate level in Excel; or satisfactory completion of the spreadsheet module offered in the HSMG program at UB.

    HSMG 643 EPIDEMIOLOGY OF HEALTH SERVICES (3)

    Provides an introduction to quantitative and methodological approaches to identifying the determinants and distribution of diseases in populations.

    HSMG 650 QUANTITATIVE TOOLS FOR HEALTH SYSTEMS MANAGEMENT II (3)

    Provides an operational understanding of quantitative models to support resource allocation decisions. Students develop an understanding of the process of quantitative modeling; learn to identify appropriate and inappropriate applications of techniques such as linear programming, forecasting, decisions analysis, scheduling and inventory control models; develop a conceptual as well as a computational understanding of these models; and critically evaluate a published operations research application. prerequisite: HSMG 632

    HSMG 660 COMPARATIVE GLOBAL HEALTH AND HUMAN SECURITY (3)

    Examines the social, economic and political determinants of a nation's health-care infrastructure; variations in national capacities and defacto national priorities; the role(s) played by international organizations and initiatives; how wide and persistent disparities influence human security; and the effects that shocks such as regime change or political upheaval, conflict or widespread human rights violations have on health and human security. In addition to basic sanitation ( potable water and managing human waste), access to medicines is emphasized as a fundamental need. Prerequisite: None

    HSMG 691 HEALTH PLANNING & PROGRAM EVALUATION (3)

    Explains the theoretical and historical foundations of health planning, the relationship between health planning and regulation and the application of planning methods.

    HSMG 695 HEALTH CARE MANAGEMENT NFORMATION SYSTEMS (3)

    Provides an extensive overview of information systems in health-care organizations from the perspective of health systems managers.

    HSMG 697 HEALTH INSURANCE AND PRE-PAID HEALTH CARE (3)

    Provides an operational understanding of insurance and alternate payment methods in health care. Includes topics relating to risk management and the roles of government, employers and individuals in the selection and use of insurance products for health care.

    HSMG 698 HEALTH CARE FRAUD AND DETECTION ANALYSIS (3)

    Designed to familiarize students with the working of major federal health programs such as Medicare, Medicaid, and the Children's Health Insurance Program. Identifies patterns of improper and fraudulent payments to providers in these programs, describes the forensic investigative techniques needed to uncover fraudulent financial transactions such as payments, and examines the means to recover payments and to reduce future fraudulent practices. Prerequisites: None.

    HSMG 699 HEALTH FINANCE (3)

    Focuses on selected, topical health-finance issues such as health insurance reform, Medicare finance revisions and emerging health-finance issues, such as preparing and financing a comprehensive national bio-preparedness program.

    HSMG 701 HEALTH ECONOMICS (3)

    An overview of the structure and financing of the U.S. health-care industry. Students learn to apply economic principles to understanding the behavior of consumers, physicians, allied health professionals, hospitals, insurers, employers and government in the health-care market. Examines how the U.S. health-care system compares to health-care systems in other countries.

    HSMG 702 SPECIAL ANALYSIS OF HEALTH CARE FRAUD (3)

    Provides a full understanding of major health-care fraud investigations conducted by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of the Inspector General, and the U.S. Department of Justice Criminal Division . Students study the structure and operation of the Office of the Inspector General and its annual audit activities related to specific health-care programs as well as relevant reports issued by the General Accountability Office pertaining to health-care program improvements that could mitigate health-care fraud. Prerequisite: HSMG 698.

    HSMG 709 INDIVIDUAL RESEARCH (1 - 4)

    Individual research on an academically sound project of interest to the student in consultation with a monitoring faculty member. Depending on the scope and depth of research, from 1 to 4 credits may be earned for successful completion of this course. prerequisite: permission of program director and monitoring faculty member

    HSMG 711 SPECIAL TOPICS IN HEALTH SYSTEMS MANAGEMENT (3)

    This course will cover specific topics, issues and trends in health management that would be of mutual interest to faculty and students alike. This course may substitute for PUAD 75: Policy Issues in Health Care. Prerequisite: None

    HSMG 725 FUNDAMENTALS OF GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SCIENCE AND SYSTEMS (3)

    Provides students with foundational knowledge in both geographic information science and Systems that will allow them to better understand and think critically about the role of "place and space" and to engage in the routine use of basic GIS technology in their studies and workplace. Students will learn to use ESRl's ArcGIS to create maps and analyze geo-data and relationships, and to present their results to others. prerequisite: none

    HSMG 750 HEALTH CARE SYSTEMS, ORGANIZATION AND MANAGEMENT (3)

    Analysis of the structure of the present American health-care system and of the costs, benefits and political realities of possible reforms. The current and future role of public administration, planning and evaluation in American health care.

    HSMG 751 LONG-TERM CARE ADMINISTRATION (3)

    Provides an in-depth knowledge of various long-term care facilities and the relevant administration entities involved. It is the study of the functions of a long-term care facility and its organizational management. It will also discuss the history of long-term care administration and its accreditation entities. prerequisites: none.

    HSMG 752 INTERNSHIP (3)

    Serves to build a bridge between theory and practice. Students have the opportunity to apply their knowledge and acquire insights into the management of health service organizations. prerequisite: completion of 27 graduate credits prior to beginning course or permission of program director

    HSMG 753 POLICY ISSUES IN HEALTH CARE (3)

    Study of a few current policy issues in the American health-care system. Particular attention to the roles and powers of nonmedical participants, including consumers, planners, administrators and policymakers.

    HSMG 755 HEALTH ADMINISTRATION (3)

    Problems and issues with performing such basic managerial functions as direction, control and staffing in health-care institutions. Emphasis on analyzing tools and techniques that are important in fulfilling these managerial functions.

    HSMG 756 MANAGED CARE ADMINISTRATION (3)

    Basic theoretical concepts concerning managed care, practical management issues and areas of controversy as they pertain to managed care. Topics include benefit design in managed care, structure and management of managed-care delivery systems, financing of managed care and future trends in managed care.

    HSMG 757 STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT FOR HEALTH CARE (3)

    Examination of strategic management in health-care organizations. Included are discussions of the nature of strategic management, the environment of health organizations and methods of environmental analysis, and methods of formulating, implementing and controlling the strategic management of health-care delivery. prerequisites: HSMG 632, HSMG 650 and either PUAD 750 or PUAD 751, or permission of M.S. in Health Systems Management program director

    HSMG 766 HEALTH SYSTEMS MGMT: ORGANIZATIONAL DESIGN AND HUMAN RESOURCES (3)

    Builds on PUAD 755 and provides an in-depth examination of organizational design theories, their applicability to various health-care settings and their implications for human resources and labor relations.

  • HSAD: Human Services Administration

    HSAD 600 FUNDRISING AND GRANT WRITING (3)

    Provides students with a thorough grounding in the principles and practices of fundrising and grant proposal development. Structured to mirror the process of fundrising management, the course leads students to develop either a fundrising plan or grant proposal for their own nonprofit entity or a case study of the organization. Students consider planning frameworks and a variety of conceptual tools before moving on to consider donor behavior (the underlying psychology and sociology) and each major form of fundrising in turn. The course concludes with an examination of the critical managerial and sectoral issues impacting fundrising, such as campaign integration, benchmarking of performance, and public trust and confidence. Prerequisite: None

    HSAD 600 FUNDRAISING AND GRANT WRITING (3)

    Provides students with a through grounding in the principles and practices of fundraising and grant proposal development. Structured to mirror the process of fundraising management, the course leads students to develop either a fundraising plan or grant proposal for their own nonprofit entity or a case study of the organization. Students consider planning frameworks and a variety of conceptual tools before moving on to consider donor behavior ( the underlying psychology and sociology) and each major form of fundraising in turn. The course concludes with an examination of the critical managerial and sectoral issues impacting fundraising, such as campaign integration, benchmarking of performance , and public trust and confidence.

    HSAD 602 HISTORY AND FOUNDATION OF HUMAN SERVICES SYSTEMS (3)

    History and foundations of human services practice. Societal factors that have fostered the evolution of human services are emphasized and basic strategies and tactics common to the delivery of human services are reviewed.

    HSAD 603 CONTEMPORARY ISSUES IN HUMAN SERVICE ADMINISTRATION (3)

    Overview of the current status of the field of human services and the political, sociocultural and economic contexts of administration. Discussion of the conceptual and theoretical issues related to the practical skills necessary for administering human services agencies. Offered at Coppin State University. prerequisite: HSAD 602 or permission of instructor

    HSAD 610 Strategies for Human Services Program Planning (3)

    Focuses on the various properties and implications of planned change. Emphasis on models, strategies and roles required when working within organizations and in the community to develop new programs with input from a variety of stakeholders.

    HSAD 611 PROGRAM EVALUATION AND POLICY ANALYSIS (3)

    Study of the conceptual and methodological issues concerning the evaluation of human services programs. Includes focus on statistical and data analysis skills and on the relationships between the program/policy design and analysis/evaluation. Offered at Coppin State University. prerequisite: HSAD 610 or permission of instructor

    HSAD 620 HUMAN SERVICES LEADERSHIP & SUPERVISION (3)

    Theoretical and practical analysis of organizational leadership, personnel (employee and volunteer) supervision, workplace design and the ethical dimension of leadership in human services agencies. Provides training in organizational relationships and staff development. Job-related case studies are used to apply principles of supervision and leadership. Offered at Coppin State University.

    HSAD 621 ADMINISTRATIVE DECISION-MAKING IN HUMAN SERVICE AGENCIES (3)

    Decision-making at the individual, work group, departmental and organizational levels within the context of human services agencies. Emphasizes development of skills necessary for securing consistency of practice, the coordination of various planning units and the economizing of planning efforts. prerequisite: HSAD 620 or permission of instructor

    HSAD 695 FIELD PRACTICUM I: HUMAN SERVICES ADMINISTRATION (3)

    Fieldwork training experience at a human services agency under the guidance of the UB and Coppin State program directors and an on-site agency mentor. Eligible for continuing studies grade. prerequisite: permission of program directors

    HSAD 696 FIELD PRACTICUM II: HUMAN SERVICES ADMINISTRATION (3)

    Continuation of HSAD 695. Fieldwork training experience at a human services agency under the guidance of the UB and CSU program directors and an on-site agency mentor. Eligible for continuing studies grade. Offered at Coppin State University. prerequisites: HSAD 695 and permission of program directors

    HSAD 698 RESEARCH PRACTICUM I: Program Planning, Implementation, Evaluation (3)

    Under the guidance of the program directors and a research committee, the student prepares an original work that displays research and writing skills. Topics include a realistic, feasible plan for a new human services program, implementation of a new program and/or evaluation of a program. Eligible for continuing studies grade. Offered at Coppin State University. prerequisite: permission of program directors

    HSAD 699 RESEARCH PRACTICUM II: PROGRAM PLANNING, IMPLEMENTATION, EVALUATION (3)

    The student continues to prepare the original work begun in HSAD 698 and will then formally defend the work before his/her research committee. prerequisite: HSAD 698

  • HSER: Human Services Administration

    HSER 100 INTRODUCTION TO HUMAN SERVICES (3)

    The social basis for human service needs is examined with special consideration given to how societies respond to these needs through the formation of service delivery systems. Case studies of contemporary human service delivery systems are emphasized.

    HSER 200 MODELS OF EFFECTIVE HELPING (3)

    This course provides the student with an overview of contemporary theories and techniques of the helping relationship. Basic communication skills (such as active listening, responding and interviewing skills) for building helping relationships are developed. Professional and ethical issues in the helping profession as it relates to Human Services will all be investigated. Prerequisite: None

    HSER 297 ISSUES IN HUMAN SERVICES ADMINISTRATION (3)

    Exploration of topics in human services administration. Content varies depending upon the interests of faculty and students. Course may be repeated when topic changes. Prerequiste; Depends on course topic and level of difficulty.

    HSER 300 GRASS ROOTS STRATEGIES OF SOCIAL CHANGE IN HUMAN SERVICES (3)

    Exploration of various frameworks concerned with strategies and techniques for planned social change relevant to community education, empowerment, organization and development, at the grass roots level. prerequisite: None

    HSER 310 FAMILY SYSTEM DYNAMICS (3)

    Examines the components of family structure, interactions and reinforcing aspects of family dynamics on the maintenance of roles, types of families, life-span changes, function and dysfunction in the context of the greater society. Prerequisite: None

    HSER 320 GENDER AND THE WORK ENVIRONMENT (3)

    Examines work environment and profession-related gender issues from legal, sociological, psychological and economic viewpoints. Topics may include gender stereotyping, career development, sexual harassment and work-life balance. Explores practices and process that embed gender into institutional structures. Prerequisite: None

    HSER 330 HUMAN SERVICES DELIVERY SYSTEMS AND DIVERSITY (3)

    Examines various issues in the context of human services delivery systems within organizational environments possessing many levels of diversity including gender, race, religion/spirituality, types of professions/ credentials, levels of education, socioeconomic status, sexual orientation and physical ability. Explores how one's own limitations, values, reaction patterns and culture may impact policies, practices, processes and interventions. Investigates perspectives of leadership, employees and service recipients. Prerequisite: None

    HSER 340 CASE MANAGEMENT AND DOCUMENTATION (3)

    This course serves as an introduction to the concept of case management toward the delivery of human services. The course will be presented in the logical sequence, from the intake interview to the termination of service. A focus will be given to assessment, planning, and implementation of case management services. The case management process will be explored as it relates to organizational, legal and ethical issues. Emphasis will be given to the skills and knowledge-base required to be an effective case manager. Pre-requisite : None

    HSER 350 SOCIAL RESEARCH METHODS (3)

    An analysis of principal research methods employed in the applied social sciences with particular emphasis on applications for human services. Topics include research design, data collection and data analysis. Practical applications are required through student projects.

    HSER 360 SOCIAL POLICY AND THE AMERICAN POLICY PROCESS (3)

    This course offers an examination of social policy issues (such as poverty, homelessness, and mental illness), as well as the American policy process and the significance of social, economic, and political factors that influence policymaking and implementation related to human services. This course considers policies at all levels of local and national interest, including agency policies, local ordinances, state and federal legislation, and global treaties, etc. Through the course, students will gain both an understanding of social policy formation, realities of current social policy and administration, as well as their role in human service delivery in effecting social policy change in their agencies, communities, and the world. This course will give students the necessary contextual background to understand the foundational social policies that guide and define human services, as well as how those policies come to be. prerequisite: none

    HSER 400 FIELD PRACTICUM FOR HSER (3)

    This course is designed to provide students the opportunity to apply the knowledge gained in the classroom in a human service based organization setting. Interns will be exposed to and or engage in activities such as supervisory opportunities, special projects, case management, budgeting, and public relations. The intern must complete a minimum of 100 hours. Both the faculty internship coordinator and agency site supervisor will guide and evaluate the intern throughout the internship. Prerequisite: HSER 100 AND HSER 200 AND HSER 340

    HSER 410 EHTICS AND EMPATHY FOR PUBLIC SERVANTS (3)

    Explores the role of ethics and empathy in the work of public servants, with a goal of preparing students for careers in public service. Relying on novels, short stories, films, television and other stories, this course provides students case examples of scenarios where ethics and empathy are relevant and/or missing. Through the course, students have the opportunity to explore the challenges, benefits, and opportunities associated with ethical and empathetic service delivery. prerequisites: none

    HSER 420 PROGRAM DESIGN AND PROPOSAL WRITING (3)

    This course builds on the ecological systems perspective that views program development as an arena for social change. The course illuminates how values needs and resources influence program design and decision-making. As a major practice strategy used in community development, Program design and Proposal writing offers a contingency framework that teaches students about the choices,decisions and situations for planning new or adapting programs within the context of diverse communities. It sharpens the skill set necessary for program development within the context of quality improvement and quality management. Prerequsite: HSER 100 and HSER 200

    HSER 430 FUNDRAISING AND GRANT WRITING (3)

    The course will provide students with a thorough grounding in the principles and practice of fundraising and grant proposal development. The course is structured to mirror the process of fundraising management and by the end of the program participants will have developed a fundraising plan or a grant proposal for their own nonprofit, or a case study of the organization . We consider planning frameworks and a variety of conceptual tools before moving on to consider donor behavior ( the underlying psychology and sociology ) and each major form of fundraising in turn. The course will then conclude with an examination of the critical managerial and sectoral issues impacting on the fundraising function, such as campaign integration, benchmarking of performance and public trust and confidence Pre-requsite : HSER 100 and HSER 200

    HSER 440 EVALUATION OF HUMAN SERVICES PROGRAMS (3)

    The purpose of this course is to provide you with a conceptual framework, sets of practical skills and related understandings about the planning and evaluation of human services programs not only in educational but in a range of human services settings. Within this context, a program is considered in a broad sense as a set of resources organized for a purpose, while a human service is considered as work or activity intended to benefit others. Pre-requisite: HSER 100 and HSER 200.

    HSER 450 HUMAN SERVICES MANAGEMENT (3)

    This course is designed to assist students with exploring management and administrative roles in human services organizations. Students will be introduced to relevant theories, concepts, and practices that are the foundation to understanding management. Students will examine common concerns, problems, and effective strategies of present day management of human services organizations at the non-profit, local, state, and federal levels. Prerequisite: HSER 101 AND HSER 200

    HSER 470 SENIOR SEMINAR IN HUMAN SERVICES (3)

    A senior-level seminar consisting of an extensive exploration of current topics in human services of mutual interest to faculty and students. Examples of the content may include welfare reform, political and social legislation as well as policy and program issues. prerequisite: senior-level standing

  • CNCM: Negotiations/Conflict Mgmt

    CNCM 102 GLOBAL CONFLICT (3)

    Students explore the causes, costs, dynamics, and potential remedies to violent and structural conflict in the international system. The course addresses these issues from a broad range of social science vantage points, including the fields of international relations, sociology, anthropology, economics, law, and conflict management. Experiential learning will include student simulations of international conflict negotiations. Prerequiste: None. [SOSC] [GIK] [QQT] [SBS]

    CNCM 297 SPECIAL TOPICS IN NEGOTIATIONS AND CONFLICT MANAGEMENT (3)

    Exploration of topics in negotiations and conflict management. Content varies depending upon the interests of faculty and students. Course may be repeated when topic changes. Prerequisite: Depends on course topic and level of difficulty.

    CNCM 340 COMMUNITY CONFLICT: CAUSES, SOURCES, SOLUTIONS (3)

    Understanding and addressing conflict is critical to community success. This course will study the nature of social conflict, from interpersonal to community-wide. Students will consider sources of conflict; ways in which conflicts develop, escalate, and deescalate: conflict styles, strategies, and tactics; and options for managing conflict. This course will also have an experiential component which will allow students to develop their own conflict management skills. Prerequiste: None

    CNCM 440 TERRORISM, COUNTERTERRORISM AND CONFLICT MANAGEMENT (3)

    This course provides an introduction to current scholarship on terrorism and counterterrorism. Students will explore cutting edge debates that highlight the need for sophisticated conflict analysis in the post 9-11 world. Readings, research, reports, films, discussion and debate, case studies, simulations and other class exercises will all be used to help students better understand the concept and origins of terrorism, explore similarities and differences in the way terrorists and counterterrorists organize and strategize, approach the problem of securing support, engage in conflict and, in some cases, resolve their conflicts. Prerequisites: None

    CNCM 497 SPECIAL TOPICS IN CONFLICT MANAGEMENT (3)

    Topics cover a broad overview of the conflict managment field. Their primary emphasis is the study conflict and its management - from conflict behaviors to conflict intervention techniques. Students read about and discuss social conflict in a number of settings, ranging from interpersonal to international conflict.

    CNCM 504 THE CONFLICT MANAGEMENT PROFESSION (3)

    Explores the diverse activities, roles and tasks of those who work in the conflict management profession. Introduces reflective practice to assist individuals, families, neighborhoods, organizations, regulatory bodies, and social and ethnic groups to take constructive steps toward managing, resolving or transforming conflict situations. Students start understanding and exploring where and how they would like to connect with conflict management as a profession.

    CNCM 506 UNDERSTANDING AND ASSESSING CONFLICT (3)

    Introduces theories of conflict and different perspectives used to understand and assess conflict. Various views of conflict, conflict escalation and resolution are studied, utilizing insights from a range of disciplines including psychology, sociology, communications, cultural studies and law.

    CNCM 508 APPROACHES TO MANAGING CONFLICT/METHODS OF DISPUTE RESOLUTION (3)

    Introduces various approaches to managing conflict and explores the differences among approaches based on domination, compromise and integration. Covers various methods of dispute resolution, including litigation, negotiation, mediation and arbitration.

    CNCM 510 RESEARCH METHODS (3)

    Introduces various methods of research in the social sciences, law and the humanities that students will encounter in the field of conflict studies. Also enables students to utilize a variety of systems of citation and reference.

    CNCM 513 NEGOTIATIONS:THEORY AND PRACTICE (3)

    Introduces the theory and practice of negotiations and explores various models of negotiation and bargaining, highlighting similarities and differences in the models and methods of negotiation. Covers various stages of negotiation, from pre-negotiation to negotiation proper to post-settlement negotiation, and emphasizes the development of skills through the use of role plays to enable the student to apply theory to cases.

    CNCM 515 MEDIATION:THEORY AND PRACTICE (3)

    Introduces the theory and practice of mediation and explores various models of the mediation process as well as diverging views concerning the role of the mediator. Key issues include neutrality and bias on the part of the mediator, confidentiality, codes of ethics for mediators and the current status of legislation concerning the qualifications and licensing of mediators. Students develop and practice mediation skills by acting as mediators in various scenarios that illustrate the process of mediation.

    CNCM 519 ADVANCED MEDIATION SKILLS (3)

    Provides students with the opportunity to develop the advanced skills necessary to function as a mediator in the context of a particular model of mediation. prerequisite: CNCM 515 highly recommended

    CNCM 620 SPECIAL TOPICS: (3)

    Explores topics in the field of negotiations and conflict management. Topics vary according to student interest and faculty member specialization. Course may be repeated for credit when topic differs. prerequisites (if any): to be determined by instructor

    CNCM 710 TERRORISM & COUNTERTERRORISM (3)

    Provides an introduction to current scholarship on terrorism and counterterrorism. Students explore cutting-edge debates that highlight the need for sophisticated conflict analysis in the post-Sept. 11 world. Readings, research, reports, films, discussion and debate, case studies, simulations and other class exercises are used to help students better understand the concept and origins of terrorism, explore similarities and differences in the way terrorists and counterterrorists organize and strategize, approach the problem of securing support, address conflict and, in some cases, resolve their conflicts. prerequisite:none

    CNCM 730 ORGANIZATIONAL CONFLICT AND CONFLICT MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS (3)

    Examines the nature of conflict as it occurs in organizations, how conflict can function both destructively and constructively in that context, and the history of how conflict has traditionally been viewed and managed in organizational contexts. Also considers the theory underlying the creation of integrated conflict management systems in organizations, the nature of such systems and how they are developed, designed and evaluated.

    CNCM 740 ETHNIC & CULTURAL FACTORS OF CONFLICT (3)

    Explores the roles played by ethnicity, race, religion and culture in the generation, resolution and conduct of conflicts within and between groups. Examines physical and symbolic markers of difference to understand both why groups differentiate themselves from one another and how mechanisms such as skin color, religious affiliation, ethnic background or cultural traditions can provide the grist for conflict or the grease that promotes resolution. Primary analysis is based on the examination of cases relevant to the different issues underlying these conflicts. prerequisite: CNCM 506 or permission of instructor

    CNCM 790 INTERNSHIP (3)

    Gives students a clinical, hands-on experience to support both their classroom learning and their career goals. Provides the opportunity to use and further develop applied conflict management skills, apply theory and research skills to the practice environment and network with conflict management professionals. Eligible for continuing studies (CS) grade; otherwise grading is pass/fail. prerequisite: completion of a minimum of 30 credits required for degree program

    CNCM 798 CAPSTONE COURSE (3)

    A reflective paper designed to integrate theory and practice and to equip the student with a well-thought-out approach to future involvement and professional practice in the field. Eligible for continuing studies (CS) grade; otherwise grading is pass/fail.

  • PUAD: Public Administration

    PUAD 619 PUBLIC MANAGEMENT (3)

    Provides an in-depth study of public organizations and management by integrating organizational theory and public management practice to address problems and issues that managers confront in public organizations. Prerequisites: None

    PUAD 620 PUBLIC POLICY (3)

    Designed to increase understanding of the public policy process. Policy frameworks and models are used to examine policy interventions in the United States. Examines the stages of policy as well as the methods that public administrators use to assess feasibility and implementation of various policies. Prerequisite; PUAD 623- Foundations: Bureaucracy and the Political Process.

    PUAD 621 HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT IN PUBLIC AND NONPROFIT ORGANIZATIONS (3)

    A study in public and nonprofit human resource management policies, practices, laws and regulations. Topics include recruitment and selection, training and development, motivation, compensation, performance appraisal, discipline, and labor relations.

    PUAD 622 PUBLIC BUDGETING AND FISCAL ADMINISTRATION (3)

    Role, dynamics, politics and processes involved in the budgetary function and associated budget preparation methods, and fiscal interrelationships of federal, state and local levels of government.

    PUAD 623 FOUNDATIONS: BUREAUCRACY AND THE POLITICAL PROCESS (3)

    Introduces students to the field of public administration theory and practice and examines the intellectual foundations, democratic context, and practical implications of contemporary public administration. Addresses organizational, functional and administrative aspects of the federal bureaucracy, as well as the interrelationships among federal, state and local agencies, and public administration as a part of the political process. Prerequisite: Students will be required to enroll in the course during their first 15 credit hours.

    PUAD 624 PUBLIC ORGANIZATION THEORY (3)

    Development and evolution of public organizational structures. A study of the postulated models and hypotheses of future needs for government organization.

    PUAD 625 INNOVATIONS IN PUBLIC MANAGEMENT (3)

    Designed to integrate the perspectives of public administration by focusing on the management problems in public agencies. Includes use of emerging techniques in management to address the problems and issues faced by public managers under the changed environment of the public sector.

    PUAD 626 INFORMATION RESOURCES MANAGEMENT (3)

    Role of computers in developing and managing information necessary for decision-making in public organizations. Includes consideration of computer applications, including the development and management of databases and the use of software applications for decision-making in both individual and distributed computing contexts. Also considers implications of computer technology, such as privacy, control and security. Working knowledge of spreadsheets and database software is required. prerequisite: computer competency

    PUAD 627 LEGAL AND ETHICAL ENVIRONMENT OF PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION (3)

    Legal and ethical dimensions of the democratic policy process as it has evolved in the United States. Attention to the manner in which historical as well as contemporary socio-political patterns of governance have shaped the notions of law and ethics that are to provide public administrators with the benchmarks of democratic accountability, responsibility and responsiveness.

    PUAD 628 STATISTICAL APPLICATIONS IN PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION (3)

    Quantitative analysis for public administrators. Topics include statistical analysis, the computer in processing data and the presentation of findings. Students must complete PUAD 628 within the first 15 credit hours.

    PUAD 629 PUBLIC PROGRAM EVALUATION (3)

    Systematic application of quantitative and qualitative research methods to the assessment of public policy interventions. Covers topics within formative and summative evaluation contexts, including needs assessments, impact evaluation and process evaluation. prerequisite: PUAD 628

    PUAD 630 ANALYTICAL TECHNIQUES IN PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION (3)

    Review of analytical techniques conventionally used in the planning, formulation and implementation of public policy. Topics include forecasting techniques, cost-benefit analysis, PERT and other commonly used techniques. prerequisite: PUAD 628

    PUAD 700 CONCEPTS AND PRACTICES OF NONPROFITS (3)

    Nonprofit organizations serve as the foundation for the third sector of the economy. This course explores the history, foundations and types of nonprofit organizations as well as the diverse political, social and economic contexts within which they exist. Prerequisite: None

    PUAD 701 PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION AND PUBLIC FINANCE (3)

    Analysis of revenue forecasting, revenue strategy, impact of inflation, taxation, “back-door” spending, pension funding, user fees and other aspects of governmental finance. Emphasis on the special characteristics of public finance in communities operating with fragmented and multilayered governmental structures.

    PUAD 702 PUBLIC FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT (3)

    Topics include municipal expenditure patterns and revenue sources, taxation at the local level, fiscal and economic aspects of federalism and federal-state-local fiscal coordination, and the role of budget in the determination of policy, in administrative integration and in influencing government operations. Emphasis on the foregoing as they pertain to the Baltimore metropolitan area.

    PUAD 703 URBAN MANAGEMENT (3)

    Topics include municipal, governmental and administrative structures and their inter-relationship in a regional context, the interfacing and management of public services, examination of governmental programs in municipal areas, municipal administrative problems and the attendant role of the public administrator. Emphasis on the foregoing as they pertain to the Baltimore metropolitan area.

    PUAD 704 MANAGING DIVERSITY (3)

    Examines issues of diversity in the workplace, particularly in relation to organizational performance and service delivery among public organizations. Uses historical and legal frameworks to consider the struggles of marginalized groups and employs theoretical and applied perspectives to examine the barriers, challenges and benefits of diversity in the workplace.

    PUAD 705 SPECIAL TOPICS IN PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION (3)

    Coverage of selected topics of current interest to students or of interest to a special segment of students. prerequisite: permission of monitoring faculty member or program director

    PUAD 709 INDIVIDUAL RESEARCH (1 - 3)

    Individual research on an academically sound project of interest to the student in consultation with a monitoring faculty member. Depending on the scope and depth of research, from 1 to 3 credits may be earned for the successful completion of this course. Eligible for continuing studies grade. Prerequisite: approval of M.P.A. program director and monitoring faculty member. Students may only enroll in PUAD 709 once for a total of three credits.

    PUAD 720 URBAN POLITICS AND POLICY PLANNNING (3)

    Study of political institutions in urban areas and the policy responses, processes and problems with reference to such issues as land use, community growth and development, environment, local and state services and regional and national urban policies, with particular focus on the Baltimore Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area.

    PUAD 725 FUNDAMENTALS OF GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SCIENCE AND SYSTEMS (3)

    Provides students with foundational knowledge in both geographic information science and Systems that will allow them to better understand and think critically about the role of "place and space" and to engage in the routine use of basic GIS technology in their studies and workplace. Students will learn to use ESRI's ArcGIS to create maps and analyze geo-data and relationships, and to present their results to others. prerequisites: none

    PUAD 730 STATE & LOCAL PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (3)

    Development and application of personnel systems and procedures in state and local jurisdictions, and how state and local politics and federal laws and regulations impact them.

    PUAD 731 PUBLIC EMPLOYEE UNION LABOR RELATIONS & COLLECTIVE BARGAINING (3)

    Study of the background, extent and nature of the unionization of government employees. Coverage of current regulations involving collective bargaining, adjudication of labor grievances and bargaining tactics.

    PUAD 732 LEADERSHIP AND ORGANIZATIONAL CHANGE (3)

    Nature of technological and environmental change as it affects the management decisions of the agency. Techniques for organizational change, including diversified but integrative decision-making structures and techniques, implementation techniques, enforcement techniques and evaluation tools. The impact of a changing environment on the leadership skills needed in a modern environment.

    PUAD 733 MANAGING PUBLIC SECTOR PROJECTS (3)

    Introduction to the theories and techniques of project management. Covers some standard project analytic techniques (e.g., PERT charts and project management software) but emphasizes recognition of barriers to effective project team functioning and project completion. Students understand and design plans for effective project management and identify and respond to problems in team dynamics and to external problems requiring adaptation.

    PUAD 734 STRATEGIC PLANNING (3)

    Covers the steps involved in developing a strategic plan for public and nonprofit organizations. Students learn how to perform a stakeholder analysis, conduct a situation analysis, develop appropriate mission statements, design effective performance measures and implement a strategic plan.

    PUAD 740 ADMININISTRATIVE LAW AND REGULATION (3)

    Role of administrative law and regulation in the governmental process. An examination of the function of the public administrator in implementing legislation through the formulation of administrative law and regulation, and the rules, procedures and techniques for their formulation.

    PUAD 760 REGULATORY POLICY AND ADMINISTRATION (3)

    Political, legal and economic dimensions of regulation. Includes a delineation of the conceptual framework for government intervention into the marketplace and a determination of the effects of this intervention. Topics include the rise of government regulations, structure and procedures of regulatory agencies, the politics of regulation and the future of regulation.

    PUAD 761 ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY AND ADMINISTRATION (3)

    Overview of environmental law, institutions and regulation and the factors that have shaped environmental policy at the federal, state and local levels. Assesses the impact of environmental policy at these levels and the impact of environmental legislation on the behavior of administrators responsible for its implementation and administration. Examines the major policy processes in controlling pollution standard-setting and compliance.

    PUAD 763 PUBLIC POLICYMAKING (3)

    Overview of the process of public policymaking, including the formulation of public issues, the consideration of issues and the adaptation of solutions to public problems. Emphasis on actors in the policy process and the environment within which they function.

    PUAD 764 PUBLIC POLICY IMPLEMENTATION (3)

    Review of the diverse conceptualization frameworks of analyzing the implementation of public programs. Emphasis is on the analysis and integration of the subsequent political, economic, social, cultural and managerial factors that impact the implementation of public policies.

    PUAD 770 GOVERNMENT-BUSINESS COOPERATION IN COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT (3)

    Review of the relations of institutions in the private and public relations of private-sector decisions to public-sector decisions and the impact of public-sector decisions on private-sector institutions. Introduces research topics related to government and business cooperation in community development. Provides a forum for the exchange of ideas between spokespersons of public- and private-sector institutions. Students write and present analytical research papers on pertinent topics.

    PUAD 775 INTERGOVERNMENTAL ADMINISTRATION (3)

    Evaluation, growth, present status and characteristics of the U.S. federal system of government. Topics include federal-state relations, state-local relations, regionalism, councils of government, interstate cooperation, grants-in-aid and revenue sharing.

    PUAD 776 LEGAL ASPECTS OF NONPROFIT ADMINISTRATION (3)

    Surveys the legal structure that defines and regulates the nonprofit sector and examines the fundamental governance issues in nonprofit corporations. Emphasizes the board of directors (trustees) and the executive director, and their collective fiduciary responsibilities established both by law and by the moral imperative derived from acting in the public interest. Prerequisites: none

    PUAD 777 POLITICAL ECONOMY OF NONPROFIT ORGANIZATIONS (3)

    Study of the role of nonprofit activity in the development and administration of public policy. Topics include the political economy of nonprofit organizations and the nonprofit sector. Nonprofit management and the relationships among government, business and nonprofit activity are examined within the current context of issues and future trends.

    PUAD 781 INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY: PUBLIC SECTOR APPLICATIONS (3)

    Design and implementation of public-sector IS and IT projects, including current developments and issues in the application of available technology to public-sector management. The role of technology in enhancing intergovernmental coordination, improving service, increasing efficiency and reducing government spending. Technologies examined include distributed transaction-oriented databases; data warehousing, management information systems and executive- and group-decision support systems; geographic information systems; office automation, voice response systems and document imaging; electronic data interchange and kiosks; and electronic commerce over public networks.

    PUAD 785 PUBLIC SECTOR PERFORMANCE MEASUREMENT (3)

    Structuring data collection and analysis techniques to determine precisely what an agency is attempting to do and what it accomplishes through its outputs. Emphasis is on shaping the outputs to have a measurable positive impact on customers and other stakeholders.

    PUAD 790 INTERNSHIP (3)

    Designed to broaden the educational experience of students through work assignments with appropriate governmental agencies. Eligible for continuing studies grade. Required of all pre-service students. prerequisite: approval of program director and monitoring faculty member

    PUAD 797 NONPROFIT MANAGEMENT: APPLIED SKILLS SEMINAR (3)

    Exploration of topics in nonprofit management of mutual interest to faculty and students, such as program evaluation, risk management, communications and board management. Content varies according to demand. Specific topic is listed in the schedule of classes. May be repeated for credit as topics change.

    PUAD 798 PROBLEM SOLVING SEMINAR IN PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION (3)

    Capstone course requires students to integrate and apply analytical skills, knowledge bases, managerial principles and normative frameworks learned in M.P.A. core courses to concrete management situations. Student must earn a B grade or better to graduate. prerequisites: completion of PUAD 621, PUAD 622, PUAD 623, PUAD 624, PUAD 625, PUAD 627, PUAD 628, PUAD 629 and PUAD 630 with grades of B- or better prior to enrolling in course (students may be concurrently enrolled in PUAD 626) or permission of Master of Public Administration program director

    PUAD 805 D.P.A. SPECIAL TOPICS (3)

    Coverage of selected topics of current interest to D.P.A. students or to a special segment of D.P.A. students. Registration is by permission of instructor only.

    PUAD 809 D.P.A: INDIVIDUAL RESEARCH (1 - 3)

    Individual research on an academically sound project of interest to the D.P.A. student in consultation with a monitoring faculty member. Depending on the scope and depth of research, 1 to 3 credits may be earned for the successful completion of this course. prerequisite: approval of D.P.A. director and monitoring faculty member

    PUAD 810 FOUNDATIONS OF PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION (3)

    Major questions, answers and concerns that have framed the development of a self-aware study of public administration. The political, social and cultural contexts in which administrative solutions have been sought. The role of preceding theories, or sometimes the rejection of them, in helping to shape modern answers to administrative questions.

    PUAD 811 STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT IN THE PUBLIC SECTOR (3)

    Covers the rise of a customer-based, results-oriented approach to solving public-sector problems. The historical foundations of such an approach and the public-sector initiatives by which it has been introduced. Modern techniques and tools for using strategic management to handle current governmental issues.

    PUAD 812 ADVANCED INFORMATION RESOURCE MANAGEMENT (3)

    Prepares public- and third-sector managers to deal effectively with issues related to the design and implementation of information systems in their agencies. Examines tools and techniques for identifying and structuring information requirements and needs (e.g., process mapping) and for managing IT implementation projects, including both in-house development and external procurements. Also explores the planning and implementation problems related to the redesign of public organizations and the way they provide services in the information age. prerequisite: PUAD 626 or permission of instructor

    PUAD 813 SEMINAR IN DOCTORAL RESEARCH (3)

    Overview of both quantitative and qualitative research methods that are applicable to the field of public administration. Emphasis on development of research questions, measurement and sampling, data collection and analysis techniques in both paradigms.

    PUAD 814 SEMINAR IN POLICY MAKING AND IMPLEMENTATION (3)

    Study of the theory and design of public policies and their implementation. Topics include the stages of the policy process, public policy paradigms, and the formulation and implementation of public programs.

    PUAD 815 PUBLIC SECTOR FINANCIAL ANALYSIS (3)

    Introduces advanced techniques employed by financial analysts in the public sector. Topics include forecasting techniques, performance measurement construction, Activity-Based Costing and expenditure analysis techniques.

    PUAD 816 ADVANCED PUBLIC SECTOR MANAGEMENT AND DECISION TECHNIQUES. (3)

    Familiarizes students with various analytical tools to aid in the executive decision-making and management of public-agency operations, including staffing, facility location, future planning and the wise allocation of scarce resources. Although such techniques are commonly used in the private sector, they are less common in the public sector, largely because public-sector objective functions are more difficult to quantify. Thus, an important component of the course is the application of such techniques to public-sector problems and the construction of objective functions that capture the trade-offs among quantitative and qualitative (subjective) “public goods.”

    PUAD 817 SEMINAR IN PROGRAM AND POLICY EVALUATION (3)

    Provides doctoral students with an introduction to program and policy evaluation in the public and nonprofit sectors. Students understand and are able to design the major components of evaluation: needs assessment, implementation evaluation, impact evaluation (formative and summative), and assessment of merit and worth. Students design evaluations that are sensitive to the requirements and constraints of particular evaluation settings.

    PUAD 824 DOCTORAL SEMINAR IN ORGANIZATIONAL THEORY (3)

    Deals with public-sector organization systems as they relate to democratic forms of governance.

    PUAD 830 SURVEY RESEARCH (3)

    In-depth exposure to survey sampling, questionnaire construction, different means of collecting survey data (mail, phone, Web) and analysis of data developed from surveys. Students develop survey instruments and perform extensive analysis of data from surveys.

    PUAD 831 CASE STUDY AND QUALITATIVE METHODS (3)

    In-depth exposure to different types of case studies (single case and multiple cases), sampling for cases, data collection methods frequently used for case studies and methods of analysis for qualitative data. prerequisite: PUAD 813

    PUAD 832 QUANTITATIVE METHODS (3)

    In-depth exposure to issues in using administrative data and research data sets collected by other entities. Also use of advanced statistical analyses including an in-depth exposure to multiple regression and its assumptions, logistic regression, factor analysis, discriminant function analysis and time series analysis. prerequisite: PUAD 813

    PUAD 834 ADVANCED SEMINAR IN EVALUATION: THEORIES AND TECHNIQUES (3)

    Helps doctoral students in public administration wishing to specialize in program and policy evaluation to achieve mastery of the basic concepts and theories of evaluation and also the recent literature of the field. Prepares students to contribute as professionals to the field of evaluation. prerequisite: PUAD 817

    PUAD 835 PRACTICUM IN PROGRAM EVALUATION (3)

    Provides doctoral students in public administration with the opportunity to be team members conducting an actual program or policy evaluation. Working with the evaluation sponsors and other stakeholders while also reading and discussing practical books and articles on evaluation methods, students develop their own integrations of evaluation theory and practice that provide guiding frameworks for practicing evaluators. prerequisite: PUAD 817

    PUAD 875 DOCTORAL SEMINAR IN FEDERALISM AND INTERGOVERNMENTAL RELATIONS (3)

    Examines the ways in which various aspects of intergovernmental relations and federalism affect the adoption and implementation of public policy.

    PUAD 898 CONTINUOUS ENROLLMENT (1)

    Provides continuing faculty direction, academic support services and enrollment services for students who have completed all course requirements for the degree but have not completed a thesis or final project. Students continue the independent work leading to finishing the thesis or final project that is significantly under way. Course may be repeated for credit as needed. Eligible for continuing studies (CS) grade; otherwise grading is pass/fail. prerequisite: completion of all course requirements for degree program

    PUAD 899 DISSERTATION RESEARCH (3 - 12)

    A written descriptive and prescriptive evaluation of the management practices of an existing agency to determine the efficacy of its structure and/or procedures. The project is directed by a faculty adviser and results in a written product for which there is an oral defense before a committee of three faculty members. Eligible for continuing studies (CS) grade; otherwise grading is pass/fail.

  • UNIV: Sophomore Seminar

    UNIV 202 SOPHOMORE SEMINAR: INTELLECTUAL TRANSITIONS (3)

    (Reserved for CPA students) Serves as a bridge from the first year to a student's major area of study, building on skills gained in First-Year Seminar: Introduction to University learning, learning communities and other general-education courses. All sophomores participate In a common academic experience designed to enhance their critical-thinking and to enable them to make connections among their academic work, personal aspirations and professional goals. Students engage a common reading across seminar sections, exploring academic discourse in broad areas, and apply core skills in communication, research, information literacy and team building to real-world issues. Prerequisite: WRIT 101; prerequisite or corequisite INFO 110 (may be waived for students who enroll with 45 credits or more). ) [CTE]

  • SPAN: Spanish

    SPAN 125 INTRODUCTION TO SPANISH I (3)

    The first semester of the process toward building the "five skills": listening, speaking, reading, writing, and understanding culture. With these goals in mind, students participate in variety of learning tasks during required classroom hours and weekly laboratory sessions.[AH]

    SPAN 126 INTRODUCTION TO SPANISH II (3)

    A second level course in the "five skills" needed to improve fluency in Spanish: listening, speaking, reading, writing and understanding culture. Students continue to improve their language skills and learn to speak Spanish for situations likely to take place outside the classroom. Prerequisite : Span 125 or equivalent. [AH]

    SPAN 297 TOPICS IN SPANISH (3)

    Exploration of topics in Spanish language. Content varies depending upon the interests of faculty and students. Course may be repeated when topic changes. Prerequisite: Depends on course topic and level of difficulty.

    SPAN 470 SPANISH-- INDEPENDENT STUDY (1 - 3)

    Designed to provide credit for a student who wants to pursue independent work under the supervision of a faculty member. The number of credits earned is determined by the supervising faculty member before the study begins. Prerequisite: SPAN 125, SPAN 126 and approval of instructor [AH]

    SPAN 497 ADVANCED TOPICS IN SPANISH (3)

    Exploration of advanced topics in Spanish. Content varies depending upon the interests of faculty and students. Course may be repeated when topic changes. Prerequisite: Depends on course topic and level of difficulty. [AH]