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Undergraduate Course Descriptions

Browse the course descriptions of all undergraduate courses that the University of Baltimore offers.

  • ACCT: Accounting

    ACCT 201 INTRODUCTION TO FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING (3)

    A comprehensive study of basic financial accounting processes applicable to a service, merchandising, and manufacturing business. An analysis of transactions, journalizing, posting, preparation of working papers and ­financial statements.

    ACCT 202 INTRODUCTION TO MANAGERIAL ACCOUNTING (3)

    An introductory study of managerial accounting processes including job order costing, process costing, cost-volume-profit analysis, standard costs, activity-based costing, cost analysis, budgeting, and managerial decision making. Prerequisite: ACCT 201 or equivalent with a minimum grade of C.

    ACCT 301 INTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTING I (3)

    A study of financial accounting ­standard setting, the conceptual framework underlying financial accounting, balance sheet and income statement ­presentations, revenue and expense ­recognition, and accounting for current assets, and current liabilities. Prerequisite: ACCT 202 with a minimum grade of C.

    ACCT 302 INTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTING II (3)

    This class is the second course of the three-semester sequence of intermediate financial accounting. This course focuses on issues related to the reporting and analysis of financial accounting information. The objective in this course is to examine in detail (with an emphasis on both the "what" and the "why") the following financial topics: 1) Operational Assets 2) Time value of money 3) Bonds and long term notes 4) Leases 5) Employee benefits and pensions. Prerequisite: ACCT301 or equivalent with a minimum grade of C.

    ACCT 306 COST ACCOUNTING (3)

    A study of cost behavior, overhead cost ­allocations, cost systems design, and an introduction to activity-based costing and control systems. Emphasis is on case studies and other practical applications. Prerequisite: ACCT 202 with minimum grade of C.

    ACCT 310 INTERMED ACCOUNTING III (3)

    The third course in a three-course sequence for accounting majors. A comprehensive view of financial accounting concepts and principles, an intensive look at the nature and determination of the major financial statements, and an examination of current accounting practice, theory, and literature. Topics include shareholders' equity, investments, income taxes, earnings per share, accounting changes, error analysis, and statement of cash flows. Prerequisite: ACCT 302 or equivalent with a minimum grade of C.

    ACCT 317 ACCOUNTING INFORMATION SYSTEMS (3)

    A study of fundamental accounting system concepts, the technology of accounting systems, file processing and data bases, the utilization of accounting ­system technology, accounting system applications, the internal control of accounting information, and the development and operation of accounting systems. Projects use manual and computer-based transaction processing systems. Prerequisite: Prior or concurrent enrollment in ACCT 301.

    ACCT 401 AUDITING (3)

    A study of Generally Accepted Auditing Standards and other standards. Topics covered include professional standards, professional ethics, audit planning, internal control, audit evidence, completing the audit, audit reports and standards for different assurance and non-assurance services. Prerequisites: Acct 302 with a minimium grade of C / Merrick School of Business student or by permission of the instructor.

    ACCT 402 Seminar in Assurance Services (3)

    A study of auditing and other assurance services with an emphasis on the world of auditing that exists outside of the college textbook. Special emphasis is given to legal liability, statistical sampling, audits of SEC registrants, research using the AICPA auditing database, and other assurance services. A case study approach is used to attempt to create a realistic view of how an auditor organizes and carries out an audit examination. Prerequisite: OPRE 202 and ACCT 401 or equivalent with a minimum grade of C.

    ACCT 403 Advanced Financial Reporting (3)

    A study of business combinations and the preparation of consolidated financial statements for consolidated enterprises, fund-type accounting for governmental units and not-for-profit entities, accounting for partnerships, and accounting for multi-national enterprises. Prerequisite: ACCT 302 or equivalent with a minimum grade of C.

    ACCT 404 ADVANCED COST ACCOUNTING (3)

    An advanced study of the concepts of process cost accounting, cost behavior, overhead cost allocations, cost system design, activity-based costing and control systems. Emphasis is on case study analysis and other practical applications of cost accounting practices to various business enterprises. Prerequisite: ACCT 306 or equivalent

    ACCT 405 INCOME TAXATION (3)

    A study and analysis of the federal income tax structure with emphasis upon the taxation of individuals. Topics include income determination, deductions, property transactions, credits, procedures, and an introduction to corporation and partnership taxation, tax planning and ethical issues. Prerequisite: ACCT 202 or equivalent with a minimum grade of C.

    ACCT 406 ADVANCED TAXATION (3)

    A continuation of the study of the federal income tax structure with emphasis on the taxation of business entities, including corporations, partnerships and entities taxed as partnerships and S corporations. Also introduces gift and estate taxes and income taxation of estates and trusts. Prerequisite: ACCT 405 or equivalent.

    ACCT 411 SEMINAR IN ACCOUNTING (3)

    A detailed study of current problems and contemporary developments in accounting literature, reports, and bulletins and a review of financial accounting theory as it relates to current accounting practices. Prerequisite: ACCT 302 or equivalent with a minimum grade of B-. Merrick School of Business student, or by permission of the instructor.

    ACCT 412 Introduction to Forensic Accounting (3)

    Provides an overview of the field of forensic accounting, focusing on the roles, responsibilities and requirements of a forensic accountant in both litigation and fraud engagements. Examines basic litigation and fraud examination theory, identifies financial fraud schemes, explores the legal framework for damages and fraud and damage assessments and methodologies, and reviews earning management and financial reporting fraud. Other topics include computer forensics and corporate governance and ethics. Actual litigation and fraud cases are used to highlight the evolving roles of forensic accounting.

    ACCT 413 Ethical Issues in Accounting (3)

    Considers business ethics issues within an accounting context from a multiple stakeholder perspective. Ethical theories, codes of ethics relevant to accountants, corporate governance and professional and corporate social responsibility are covered. The course emphasizes the application of concepts such as professionalism, integrity, independence and objectivity to individual decision-making.

    ACCT 414 Federal and State Government Accounting (3)

    The course covers the basics of federal, state and local (municipal) accounting with particular focus on fund accounting and issues specific to the accounting by the US Federal Government. The course coverage will roughly approximate the curriculum of Part II and III of Exam II of Certified Government Financial Manager examination.

    ACCT 493 HONORS SEMINAR (3)

    An advanced interdisciplinary seminar that focuses on important books and issues and encourages independent thinking, clear presentation and an understanding of the concerns and methods of various disciplines. The course may be team taught; topic and instructor(s) may change from semester to semester. Course may be repeated for credit when topic changes. prerequisites: 3.3 GPA and permission of the Denit Honors Program director

    ACCT 494 HONORS PROJ/THESIS (3 - 6)

    Directed individual instruction in an advanced project of the student's choice; the project must be academically related to this discipline. Each student works closely with a faculty director who guides his/her progress. The project must be of honors quality and must be finally approved by both the faculty director and a second faculty member. Course is eligible for a continuing studies grade. prerequisite: 3.3 GPA and permission of both the Denit Honors Program director and the faculty director

    ACCT 495 ACCOUNTING INTERNSHIP (3)

    Provides students with real-world accounting experience. The course requires approximately 175 hours of practical work with a qualified firm based on explicit statements of student responsibilities and faculty/firm monitoring mechanisms. Students will work closely with both the firm and a faculty member. It is recommended that students complete an internship in their junior year. prerequisites: Completion of nine semester hours of accounting with a minimum GPA of 3.0. Completion of MGMT 330 or permission of the instructor. Permission of the instructor is required.

    ACCT 497 SPECIAL TOPIC: (3)

    The accounting faculty, from time to time, offer an opportunity to integrate new material into the undergraduate program reflecting changes in the field and in the educational needs of students. Prerequisites: ACCT 202 or equivalent with a grade of C or better or instructor permission.

    ACCT 499 INDEPENDENT STUDY: ACCOUNTING (1 - 3)

    An in-depth study of a specific accounting topic performed on an independent basis by the student under the direction of a faculty member. Completion of a major paper as part of the independent study is required. For eligibility and ­procedures, refer to the Merrick School of Business Independent Study Policy.

  • ANTH: Anthropology

    ANTH 110 CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY (3)

    Provides an introduction to the field of cultural anthropology, the study of human cultural variation throughout the world, both past and present. This course focuses on the general concepts of anthropology as a discipline, the evolution and structure of human social groups, and in-depth culture description and cross-cultural comparison involving both past and extant societies. [SOSC] [QQT] [GIK] [SBS] [GD]

    ANTH 115 HUMAN ORIGINS (3)

    An introduction to physical anthropology and archaeology, two subdisciplines within the field of anthropology. Physical anthropology has two major objectives: the reconstruction of the evolutionary history of Homo sapiens and the study of human genetic, anatomical and physiological diversity. Archaeology is devoted to the study of the life ways of past peoples through the examination of cultural remains. [SOSC] [QQT] [GIK] [SBS]

    ANTH 201 INTRODUCTION TO ARCHAEOLOGY (3)

    Introduction to the basic theories, methods and kinds of data that archaeologists use to study the lives of people who lived in the past, including their natural environments, material cultures, foodways and socioeconomic systems. Students are introduced to the use of anthropological archaeology in the investigation of ancient peoples of the Old and New Worlds, as well as people of the recent past and how their lives were affected by European imperialism, institutionalized racism and the global capitalist system. [SOSC]

    ANTH 202 INTRODUCTION TO ARCHAEOLOGY LABORATORY (1)

    Emphasis is placed on hands-on experience in archaeology through the study of artifacts in the laboratory, the application of archaeological methods in the field and the analysis of archaeological data using computer statistics packages and geographic information systems software. Students take the important concepts and theories of archaeology and learn how to apply them in academic research. This course has ANTH 201 as a co-requisite. $65 LAB FEE REQUIRED

    ANTH 222 HUMAN ENVIRONMENTAL ADAPTATIONS (3)

    Examines the various ways humans adapt culturally to their physical and biological environments. Societies of a variety of time periods and levels of complexity are studied. Many different types of habitat and settlement are considered, from tropical rain forests to arctic zones, small villages to cities. The impact human societies have on their environments is an important theme in class lectures and discussions.

    ANTH 252 ARCHAEOLOGICAL RESEARCH METHODS (4)

    Provides in-depth exposure to the methods used by anthropological archaeologists as they learn about past cultures and disseminate the knowledge they obtain, including field survey, excavation, artifact analysis, quantitative techniques, reporting, and literature review. Subject matter is conveyed to students in the form of lectures, discussion of case studies, and hands-on laboratory exercises. Lab fees required. Prerequisites :None

    ANTH 295 HISTORICAL ARCHAEOLOGY (3)

    Deals broadly with anthropological archaeology as it applies to cultures with written records. Students receive an introduction to the methods and analytical techniques that historical archaeologists use to learn about past literate societies. Issues related to the European colonization of the New World, gender, ethnicity, slavery, and the development of the capitalist system figure prominently in course material. Prerequisites: None. [SOSC] [QQT] [GIK] [SBS]

    ANTH 320 FORENSIC ANTHROPOLOGY (4)

    Explores the methods and concepts of the fields of physical anthropology and human osteology as they relate to the criminal justice system. Formal lectures and the discussion of case studies provide a terminological, conceptual, and theoretical foundation. Through laboratory exercises, students gain a general understanding of the identification of human remains and causes of death, including the determination of sex, age, evidence of trauma, and time of death. Lab fee required. Prerequisite: None [IL]

    ANTH 365 HUMAN POPULATION DYNAMICS (3)

    Examines the effects of fertility, mortality, and migration on the size and structure ofhuman populations. An anthropological focus is used to link: demography to cultural attributes, such as economy, religious practices, education, marriage, gender, and class. Environmental issues as they relate to the growth ofhuman populations are important themes.

    ANTH 410 CULTURAL RESOURCE MANAGEMENT (3)

    Involves the broad study of cultural resources, which include both material aspects of culture, such as historical structures and artifacts, and nonmaterial cultural manifestations, such as music, dance, and folklore. Students are introduced to the issues surrounding the preservation of cultural heritage. The legal and business management aspects of CRM as it relates to archaeology form an important component of coursework. Prerequisite: None

    ANTH 440 ANTHROPOLOGICAL THEORY (3)

    This course deals broadly with the evolution of anthropological thought from the 19th century to today,including the areas of cultural evolution, gender, Marxism, political economy, ethnicity, agency, social justice,social structure, symbolism, and cultural materialism. Coursework combines formal lectures with group discussions of assigned readings. Prerequisites: None

    ANTH 488 SPECIAL TOPICS IN ANTHROPOLOGY (3)

    An intensive study of an issue or set of related issues in the discipline of anthropology. Content varies depending upon the interests of faculty and students. Course may be repeated for credit when the topic changes. Prerequisite: None

    ANTH 490 INTERNSHIP IN CULTURAL RESOURCE MANAGEMENT (3 - 4)

    Provides students majoring in Applied Anthropology the opportunity to gain hands-on experience working with nonprofit institutions, government agencies, or private firms associated with cultural resource management. Course is eligible for continuing studies grade. Pre-requisite: None

    ANTH 499 SPECIAL PROJECTS IN ANTHROPOLOGY (3)

    This capstone experience for Applied Anthropology majors involves the implementation of a research project under the supervision of a faculty member. The work may include primary research, a review paper, or another type of scholarly research product. This course is eligible for a continuing studies grade. Prerequisite: Permission of Program Chair.

  • APPL: Applied Psychology

    APPL IRR INTER-INSTITUTIONAL COURSE (3)

    No course description available.

  • ARTS: Arts

    ARTS 101 MUSIC AND ARTS AS CRAFT (3)

    Examines the creative connections among individual imagination, artistic creation, audience reception and financial considerations, looking at the creative processes of artists such as Michelangelo, Mozart and Jackson Pollock as examples of the complex, often laborious and always evolving efforts that result in great works of art. Students talk with working artists, composers, conductors and collectors in the Baltimore area. [ART] [HAT] [AH]

    ARTS 121 WORLD MUSIC (3)

    Equips students to understand diverse world cultures through the lens of those cultures' musical lives. Students develop skills in listening perception and cultural analysis while focusing on musical traditions from Africa, Central Europe, Native American communities, Latin America, India, Indonesia and Japan. The course also presents music's basic structural elements and descriptive terminology. [ART] [HAT] [AH] [GD]

    ARTS 201 THE ARTS IN SOCIETY (3)

    An overview of the role that individual artistic expression and group artistic movements have played throughout history, with a focus on the individual and the arts, economics and the arts, and politics and the arts. [ART] [AH] [IL]

    ARTS 202 TECHNOLOGY IN THE ARTS (3)

    An exploration of ways that technology has shaped the arts throughout history, that artists have appropriated and responded to technology, that technology facilitates management of the arts and that emerging technologies continue to influence the arts. [TF]

    ARTS 230 THE ART OF FILM (3)

    A study of film as an art form. Course considers film as an artifact, made in particular ways and having a certain style and structure. Emphasis is placed on the ways film represents space and time. Laboratory fee required.

    ARTS 297 TOPICS IN THE ARTS I (3)

    Intensive exploration of topics in the arts of mutual interest to students and faculty. The topic of study appears under that name in the class schedule. Course may be repeated for credit when topic changes. Laboratory fee may be required. [ART] [HAT] [AH]

    ARTS 298 TOPICS IN THE ARTS II (3)

    Intensive exploration of topics in the arts of mutual interest to students and faculty. The topic of study appears under that name in the class schedule. Course may be repeated for credit when topic changes. Laboratory fee may be required.

    ARTS 304 ARTS AND IDEAS (3)

    An interdisciplinary study of enduring works of imagination and intellect that have contributed to the making of contemporary civilization. Examples of art, architecture and music are used to illuminate central themes in literature, philosophy and history. The cultural resources of the Balti¬more area are used wherever appropriate. [ART] [CTE] [GIK] [HAT] [AH]

    ARTS 351 THE BUSINESS OF BEING AN ARTIST (3)

    A hands-on examination of the practical skills that are required to make a living as a professional creative artist in context of the 21st-century U.S. workforce. Topics include intellectual property, artists’ agents and managers, entrepreneurial uses of the Web, leveraging social and new media, fundamentals of self-employment, grant-writing basics and complementary career tracks.

    ARTS 352 ESSENTIALS OF ARTS MANAGEMENT (3)

    Provides a broad-based view of the business of running a nonprofit arts organization in the context of the current economic environment, including grant writing, bookkeeping, marketing and management issues, event promotion and board development. prerequisite: ARTS 201 or INTA Program Director Permission

    ARTS 397 TOPICS IN INTEGRATED ARTS (3)

    Intensive exploration of arts-related topics. Content varies according to the concurrent interests of faculty and students. Specific topic is listed in the schedule of classes. Course may be repeated for credit when topic changes. prerequisite: none unless listed in the class schedule

    ARTS 398 SPECIAL TOPICS IN INTEGRATED ARTS (3)

    Intensive exploration of arts-related topics. Content varies according to the concurrent interests of faculty and students. Specific topic is listed in the schedule of classes. Course may be repeated for credit when topic changes. Laboratory fee may be required. Prerequisite: none unless listed in the class schedule.

    ARTS 475 INTERNSHIP IN INTEGRATED ARTS (3)

    Students apply skills and knowledge from coursework to jobs in the field of arts management or performance. Interns will meet periodically as a group to share experiences and discuss problems and successes. Eligible for continuing studies grade; otherwise, grading: pass/fail. prerequisites: senior status and permission of the program director.

    ARTS 476 SEMINAR IN INTEGRATED ARTS (3)

    Senior-level capstone seminar required of all Integrated Arts majors. Through completion of a major project, a final paper and class discussion, students will demonstrate their knowledge and skills related to the role of the arts in society; the interaction of technology and the arts; and the integration of arts production, analysis and management. prerequisite: ARTS 475

    ARTS 489 INDEPENDENT STUDY IN ARTS MANAGEMENT (3)

    Consideration and completion of a special project in the area of arts management. Each student works closely with a faculty member who helps to set goals, develop a course plan and guide progress. Projects vary with individual student interests. prerequisite: permission of the program director

    ARTS 493 HONORS SEMINAR (3)

    An advanced interdisciplinary seminar that focuses on important books and issues and encourages independent thinking, clear presentation and an understanding of the concerns and methods of various disciplines. The course may be team taught; topic and instructor(s) may change from semester to semester. Course may be repeated for credit when topic changes. Prerequisites: 3.5 GPA credit when topic changes. prerequisites: 3.5 GPA and permission of the Denit Honors Program director

    ARTS 494 HONORS PROJECT (3)

    Directed individual instruction in an advanced project of the student's choice; the project must be academically related to this discipline. Each student works closely with a faculty director who guides his/her progress. The project must be of honors quality and must be finally approved by both the faculty director and a second faculty member. Course is eligible for a continuing studies grade. Prerequisites: honors standing, 3.5 GPA and permission of both the Denit Honors Program director and the faculty director.

    ARTS 497 SPECIAL TOPICS IN INTEGRATED ARTS (3)

    Intensive exploration of arts-related topics. Content varies according to the concurrent interests of faculty and students. Specific topic is listed in the schedule of classes. Course may be repeated for credit when topic changes. Laboratory fee may be required. Prerequisite: none unless listed in the class schedule.

    ARTS IRR INTER- INSTITUTIONAL COURSE (3)

    No course description available.

  • BIOL: Biology

    BIOL 101 HUMANKIND AND THE BIOLOGICAL WORLD (3)

    Deals in a broad sense with how humans interact with, affect and are affected by other organisms. Presents an overview of the history of scientific thought, including important ¬persons, shifts in philosophy and technological innovations. Pathogenic organisms, genetic predisposition and natural immunity to disease, as well as disease treatments and cures are discussed. Addresses the ways that human activities such as hunting, commercial fishing and deforestation have had an impact on other life on Earth. [GSCI] [QQT] [BPS]

    BIOL 111 HUMAN BIOLOGY WITH LAB (4)

    Provides an overview of the structure and essential processes of the human body, including digestion, blood circulation, and the brain and senses. Human evolution, reproduction, early development and aging, and immunity to disease are discussed. The laboratory component of the course focuses on the design, practice and reporting of science. It includes exercises and experiments dealing with light microscopy, cell biology, genetics, and human anatomy and physiology. Laboratory fee required. [GSCI] [QQT] [BPSL]

    BIOL 121 FUNDAMENTALS OF BIOLOGY WITH LAB (4)

    Introduction to the diversity of life on Earth. Cell structure, reproduction and chemistry are discussed. Provides an overview of the evolution, physiology and ecology of animals, plants and microbial life, including the impact of human behavior on ecosystems. The laboratory component of the course focuses on the design, practice and reporting of science. Laboratory exercises and experiments include an introduction to light microscopy; cell division; genetics; cellular respiration; photosynthesis; environmental science; and the examination of bacterial, botanical and zoological specimens. Laboratory fee required. [GSCI] [QQT] [BPSL]

    BIOL 122 FUNDAMENTALS OF BIOLOGY LABORATORY (1)

    THIS COURSE, WITH ITS CO-REQUISITE BIOL 121, SATISFIES THE LABORATORY SCIENCE GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENT. Focuses on the design, practice, and reporting of science. Laboratory exercises include an introduction to light microscopy, cell division, genetics, and the examination of bacterial, fungal, botanical, zoological specimens. Experiments expose students to physiological processes, such as cellular respiration and photosynthesis. Introduces students to ecology and environmental science and the implementation of field research Lab Fee

  • BULA: Business Law

    BULA 151 BUSINESS LAW I (3)

    A basic study of the judicial system, contracts, agency, fraud, sale of personal property, warranties, transfer of title, and legal remedies.

    BULA 251 BUSINESS LAW II (3)

    A detailed study of the law of bailments, public carriers, negotiable instruments, secured transactions, real property, personal property, landlord and tenant rights and obligations, real estate mortgages, wills and estate of descendants, trusts, insurance, suretyship, guaranty, bankruptcy and labor law. Representative CPA law questions are reviewed and discussed. Note: Business Law II cannot be substituted for a 300- or 400-level business or management elective. prerequisite: BULA 151

  • CHEM: Chemistry

    CHEM 101 CHEMISTRY AND THE MODERN WORLD (3)

    Focuses on the relationship between people and chemistry. Introduction to the fundamentals of chemistry, including the nature of matter and energy, atomic structure and chemical bonds. Addresses such subjects as the characteristics and makeup of the compounds that power automobiles and heat homes, the drugs that alleviate pain or ease depression, and the foods eaten to provide the components of the life-sustaining processes of the human body. [GSCI] [QQT] [BPS]

  • CMAT: Communications

    CMAT 130 BALTIMORE IN THE MEDIA (3)

    A study of the image of Baltimore through the lens of the media. Students analyze narrative and non-narrative films, television programs, books, short stories, websites, newspapers, magazines and blogs to gain a greater understanding of where they live and the city’s evolution from the eyes of those who record and promote its happenings. Laboratory fee may be required. [ART] [GIK] [AH]

    CMAT 201 COMMUNICATING EFFECTIVELY (3)

    Introduction to oral communication: interpersonal, small group and public speaking. Emphasis on accurately transmitting information, using effective strategies for informing and persuading, using effective communication techniques to work with others, and feeling at ease in front of an audience. Laboratory fee required. [CMAT] [COM] [ELECGE] [OC]

    CMAT 207 PRACTICUM IN COMMUNICATION (3)

    Applied learning experience tailored to each student’s academic and career interests. Students gain applied work experience in a communication-related field. Grading: pass/fail. Note: This course does not satisfy the corporate communication internship requirement. prerequisite: permission of the program director

    CMAT 211 COMPUTER GRAPHICS: PUBLISHING (3)

    Introduction to page layout/design, illustration and presentation software. Students learn layout and design graphics for print publication and screen presentation. Laboratory fee required. prerequisite: working knowledge of MacOS

    CMAT 212 COMPUTER GRAPHICS: IMAGING (3)

    Introduction to photographic and vector based software. Students process photographs and create vector graphics for web and print distribution. Laboratory fee required. prerequisite: working knowledge of MacOS

    CMAT 215 INTRODUCTION TO DESIGN (3)

    Introduces the basic principles of design—contrast, repetition, alignment and proximity—and applies them through a series of assignments. Students examine the work of famous designers, along with important design styles of the 19th and 20th centuries. Other topics include color theory, grids and the design process. [ART] [HAT] [AH]

    CMAT 216 HISTORY OF GRAPHIC DESIGN (3)

    Introduction to the history of graphic design. Addresses the difference between art and design and the roles both play in design's evolution. Areas of emphasis include historical periods, key movements, typography, significant events and pre-eminent designers [ART] [HAT] [AH]

    CMAT 231 DECODING MEDIA (3)

    Helps students develop a vocabulary and techniques for analyzing images and sounds: movies, ads, photographs, websites and more. Examines composition, color, sequencing, animation and sound and specifically how those elements alter ¬meaning. [ART] [CTE] [HAT] [AH]

    CMAT 271 INTERPRETING POP CULTURE (3)

    Interpreting Pop Culture (3) Examines various elements that define popular culture, among them the mass media, sports, fashion, restaurants and food, architecture, amusement parks and religion. Students look at ways that pop culture institutions and products both shape and reflect the larger culture. [ART] [HAT] [AH]

    CMAT 296 TOPICS IN SPEECH COMMUNICATION (3)

    Intensive exploration of topics in speech communication. The topic for study appears in the class schedule. Course may be repeated for credit when topic changes. Laboratory fee required. [CMAT] [ELECGE]

    CMAT 297 TOPICS IN DIGITAL COMMUNICATION (3)

    Intensive exploration of a specific topic related to digital communication or media studies. The topic studied appears under that name in the course registration schedule. Lab fee may be required. [AH]

    CMAT 300 PUBLIC SPEAKING (3)

    A performance-oriented examination of the principles of public communication, emphasizing theory and rhetorical structure as well as presentation. Includes critiqued in-class practice of a variety of speech forms and strategies. Laboratory fee required.

    CMAT 303 ORAL COMMUNICATION IN BUSINESS (3)

    Extensive practice in presentational speaking, briefing techniques, the mechanics and dynamics of group meetings and the development of interviewing, critical listening and interpersonal communication skills. Laboratory fee required. [CMAT] [COM] [ELECGE]

    CMAT 320 ARGUMENTATION, DEBATE AND SOCIETY (3)

    Issue analysis, evidence evaluation, critical reasoning and counter advocacy. The principles of argumentation and debate are applied through student presentations and critical observation of contemporary debate in legal and legislative bodies. Laboratory fee required.

    CMAT 333 MEDIA GENRES (3)

    Analysis of the patterns and conventions of a specific type of media program (e.g., Western, science fiction, situation comedy), media artist (e.g., Hitchcock, Allen, Capra) or style (e.g., film noir). Course may be repeated for credit when topic changes. Laboratory fee required.

    CMAT 334 ORAL INTERPRETATION OF LITERATURE (3)

    Creative reading: the transformation of the writer’s word through the reader’s voice in expository, poetic, narrative and dramatic forms. A progression from reading to analysis to interpretation to presentation. Laboratory fee required.

    CMAT 336 PLAYS IN PERFORMANCE (3)

    Students study dramatic values, theatrical production values, and dramatic styles, and then apply that knowlege through the critical analysis of area theatrical productions. Offered as needed.

    CMAT 340 SURVEY OF DIGITAL COMMUNICATION (3)

    Organizations,consumers, and private individuals are flocking to digital communication, leaving traditional media behind. Through case studies, investigation, and projects, this course will examine the strengths and weaknesses of, differences between, and societal consequences of old and new media. Prerequisite: None

    CMAT 342 THE RHETORIC OF DIGITAL COMMUNICATION (3)

    Overview of principles, strategies, and techniques for intentional communication that occurs within particular contexts and that influence communication choices. These include audience analysis, information transfer, persuasion,and associated ethical considerations. Special attention to changes from traditional to electronic to digital media. Prerequisite: None

    CMAT 350 INTEGRATED COMPUTER GRAPHICS (3)

    Introduction to a variety of desktop publishing, graphics manipulation and presentation software and digitizing and printing hardware. Students learn to create and manipulate images and integrate graphics with text. Laboratory fee required. Students who have completed CMAT 211 and CMAT 212 may not take this course for credit.

    CMAT 352 MEDIA LITERACY (3)

    An upper-level theory course that introduces students to a variety of ways of understanding the interactions between media and culture. The course examines media content and effects, media industries, cultural perceptions and notions about how meaning is constructed in these environments.

    CMAT 353 RESEARCH METHODS IN DIGITAL COMMUNICATION (3)

    Introduction to strategies, techniques, and tools useful in communication research. Students will gain experience finding and evaluating sources, identifying theoretical frameworks, and understanding the strengths, weaknesses, and applications of various research methodologies. Prerequisite: WRIT 300. [IL]

    CMAT 355 COMMUNICATION THEORY AND LEARNING (3)

    Investigation and survey of contemporary communication theories and their application to learning through current research and literature in the field. Application to designing media programs and packages to meet specific instructional needs.

    CMAT 357 PRINCIPLES OF DESIGN (3)

    An introduction to the principles of design. The course will focus on the organization of visual space, typography, paper and color choices, visual strategies, and appropriate visual design choices for a variety of audiences. Prerequisite: Digital Communication computer graphic competency requirement. Laboratory Fee Required.

    CMAT 358 DIGITAL DESIGN (3)

    Introduction to interactive design principles, fundamental Web development concepts, and standards-based design practices that underlie digital design production for websites. Emphasis will be on how to create, manipulate, and prepare HTML and CSS-based web pages, designing effective site interfaces, appropriate typography and image use for the web, structural and content planning, the website development process and workflow, and increasing usability and functionality for enhanced user experience on the Web. Prerequisite : Digital Communication computer graphics competency requirement. Laboratory Feel [TF]

    CMAT 359 PRINT PRODUCTION (3)

    Processes and strategies for moving work from the designer's screen to the printer and finally to the audience. The course will examine the business relationship between designers and print vendors, the various stages of the printing process as it relates to digital design, and budget considerations that affect design. Students will learn to write print specifications and weigh the strengths and weaknesses of different printers and printing process. Laboratory Fee. Prerequisite : None

    CMAT 363 CREATIVE WRITING WORKSHOP: SCREENWRITING (3)

    Intensive writing experience for students interested in writing drama for television and film. Emphasizes characterization, dialogue and plot development as well as conventions of and script formats for television and film.

    CMAT 364 DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY (3)

    Explores creation and manipulation of both still and video images in the digital environment. Through lectures, critiques, demonstrations, picture taking and digital manipulation exercises, students learn to shoot, edit and use a variety of digital techniques to produce material for print and Web distribution. Emphasis is placed on the development of portfolio-quality pieces. Laboratory fee required.

    CMAT 366 PRODUCING SOUND PORTRAITS (3)

    Introduction to the art and craft of audio production. Students will listen to and produce a series of short audio programs, learning the tools, techniques, and asthetics of the craft along the way.

    CMAT 368 PHOTOJOURNALISM (3)

    Problems of producing and selecting photos for print and for other visual media. The relationship between text, photographs and design. Experience in preparing photo essays that incorporate both photographs and copy. Laboratory fee required.

    CMAT 369 DIGITAL VIDEO (3)

    The use of portable video equipment for producing location and small-studio nonbroadcast presentations and the planning and management of industrial video facilities. The production context is emphasized with special attention given to public-access cable, corporate and institutional uses of video. Laboratory fee required.

    CMAT 371 MASS MEDIA AND SOCIETY (3)

    Mass media as a vital force in contemporary society. The impact of television, film, music, advertising and other media on our economic, political and social systems. Evaluation of means to effect creative solutions to social problems via media use. A study of current controversies and research. Laboratory fee may be required.

    CMAT 381 REPRESENTING REALITY: NEWS AND DOCUMENTARY (3)

    Examination of the process, problems and techniques of gathering and presenting information. Moving from a historical context, the course looks at the lines between news, documentary and propaganda; the forces that shape and influence the presentation of information; difficulties in determining objectivity; and contemporary issues relating to reality programming. Balancing theory and analysis are hands-on newsgathering and production activities. Laboratory fee may be required.

    CMAT 391 PUBLIC RELATIONS STRATEGIES (3)

    Students will learn the strategies and tactics ( traditional and digital) that public relations specialists use to build relationships, manage brand reputations, and tell brand stories. These include situation and audience analysis, as well as media mix and dealing with clients. Special attentions will be given to maximizing visibility via social media. Prerequisite: None

    CMAT 392 MEDIA BRANDING (3)

    In depth exploration of marketing and brand identity. Students explore successful historic and current campaigns, scrutinize media outlets for best brand penetration, and create and present their own brand identity campaign. Special emphasis is on digital and global marketing through social media. Prerequisite: Computer Graphics Competency Requirement.

    CMAT 407 INTERNSHIP IN COMMUNICATION (3)

    Students apply skills and knowledge from coursework to jobs in the field of corporate communication. Grading: pass/fail. Course is eligible for a continuing studies grade. prerequisites: senior status and permission of the program director

    CMAT 451 COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGIES (3)

    Development of communication technologies, from mechanical, electrical, and wired to digital, wireless, and interactive. The course will keep students abreast of current practices, evolution and changes in interpersonal, mass and social media, focusing on technical development, economic and political factors, potential applications and societal impact. [TF]

    CMAT 453 MEDIA AND COMMUNITY (3)

    An introduction to the ways that communications media shape people’s perceptions of communities, ways that citizens can use various media to change those perceptions and ways to strengthen communities through increased and broader-based communication. Students examine case studies, learn basic techniques of producing messages in a variety of media and propose solutions to problems in their own communities by utilizing those media.

    CMAT 454 MAGAZINE DESIGN (3)

    A study of design strategies, techniques, and decisions for company, trade, mass-market (consumer), print and digital magazines. The course also examines the contributions of each department and relationships among major staff positions. Students will conceive of, and design, a new print of digital magazine. Prerequisite: CMAT 357 Principles of Design. Laboratory fee required.

    CMAT 455 HYPERMEDIA (3)

    An introductory survey of the many types of hypermedia, multimedia and other means of nonlinear writing now available in fiction, education and business. Combines theory and hands-on experience in the reading and composition of hypermedia and Web sites. Students explore the position of this new technology/language in contemporary culture.

    CMAT 456 MULTIMEDIA DESIGN AND PRODUCTION (3)

    The conceptualization and production of multimedia design. After studying the fundamentals of interactivity, students learn to digitize sound and video, integrate these elements with graphic design and written text, develop prototypes and examine various interactive software applications. Application of problem-solving techniques to the corporate environment and media applications. Laboratory fee required.

    CMAT 457 ADVANCED PRINT DESIGN (3)

    An advanced design course emphasizing the integration of typography and images in a series of projects of moderate and increasing complexity. Building on the foundation learned in CMAT 357, this course will focus on critical thinking and execution of ideas for a variety of audiences. Prerequisite: CMAT 357. Laboratory Fee.

    CMAT 458 PROJECT MANAGEMENT (3)

    An upper-level introduction to the skills and concepts necessary for the administration of a communications department of creating a freelance business. Topics include creation of a business identity, production planning and control, market and cost analysis, project proposals, estimating and billing forms and procedures, managing a real-world project, client presentations, organizational theory, legal and tax issues, and wiring a business plan.

    CMAT 459 ADVANCED DIGITAL DESIGN (3)

    This course buids upon the skills and fundamental Web design concepts introduced in CMAT 358 Digital Design. Studentw will learn advanced standards techniques and design skills and strategies for building complex websites and mobile applications. prerequisite : CMAT 358 Digital Design. Laboratory Fee.

    CMAT 469 ADVANCED AUDIO VIDEO PRODUCTION (3)

    Advanced techniques and experience in planning, producing, and editing audio and video presentations. Prerequisite: CMAT 369 or the equivalent; or permission of the instructor Laboratory fee.

    CMAT 475 MEDIA CRITICISM (3)

    Examination and application of the criteria for critically analyzing film, video and audio. Evaluation of the role of the critic and critical publications. Students compose and present critical reviews.

    CMAT 480 PORTFOLIO DEVELOPMENT (3)

    After articulating their professional goals—for example, as writers, designers, videographers or public relations specialists—students determine which of the materials they have created in the past will contribute positively to their portfolios and revise and improve those pieces. They determine what additional items their portfolios need and create them from scratch. Finally, they develop strategies for applying and interviewing for professional positions. Laboratory fee required. Note: Students entering this class must have a pre-existing body of work from which to draw. prerequisite: permission of the program director

    CMAT 485 SEMINAR IN DIGITAL COMMUNICATION (3)

    Capstone experience for digital communication majors. Students will complete a theoretical or applied project in their declared area of specialization and will include the product itself, appropriate documentation, and a reflective essay. Students will present the work to the faculty and other students in the major. They will also develop portfolios of their work and professional resumes. Prerequisite: Completion of the Digital Communications core ( or to be simultaneously enrolled in final core classes), senior status and permission from program director . Laboratory fee may apply.

    CMAT 489 DIRECTED INDEPENDENT STUDY (3)

    Consideration and completion in depth of a special topic or project in communication. Each student works closely with a faculty member who helps set goals, develop a course plan and guide progress. The project must be carefully planned and have approval of the instructor involved and the program director. prerequisite: permission of both the instructor and the program director

    CMAT 493 HONORS SEMINAR: (3)

    An advanced interdisciplinary seminar that focuses on important books and issues, encourages independent thinking, clear presentation, and an understanding of the concerns and methods of various disciplines. The course may be team taught; topic and instructor(s) may change from semester to semester. Course may be repeated for credit when topic changes. Prerequisites: 3.5 GPA and permission of the Honors Director.

    CMAT 494 HONORS PROJECT (3 - 6)

    Directed individual instruction in an advanced project of the student’s choice; the project must be academically related to this discipline. Each student works closely with a faculty director who guides his/her progress. The project must be of honors quality and must be finally approved by both the faculty director and a second faculty member. Course is eligible for a continuing studies grade. prerequisites: 3.5 GPA and permission of both the Denit Honors Program director and the faculty director

    CMAT 497 SPECIAL TOPICS IN COMMUNICATIONS (3)

    Intensive exploration of communication-related topics that are of mutual interest to faculty and students. Content varies according to the concurrent interests of faculty and students. The topic for study appears in the class schedule. Course may be repeated for credit when topic changes. Laboratory fee required. prerequisite: determined by topic

  • CSCE: Community Studies/Civic Engage

    CSCE 100 URBAN SOLUTIONS (3)

    Provides an introduction to the field of urban studies and to the practices of studying cities and metropolitan areas. Students are exposed to a variety of current and historic urban challenges as well as policy solutions. The course exposes students to the complexity of life in metropolitan regions, using the Baltimore area and other cities nationally and internationally as case studies. [SOSC] [QQT] [GIK] [CTE] [SBS]

    CSCE 200 UNDERSTANDING COMMUNITY (3)

    Allows students to explore basic concepts of community: a group’s history and change over time, the lines that divide communities, the physical movement of groups, the responsibilities of individuals within the community and the role community plays in social control. Students begin to master the skills of selection and synthesis as they use historical documents, census data, community mapping, field observations, nonfiction and fiction to make observations about groups and compare their findings to the ways groups are depicted by outsiders. [SOSC] [QQT] [GIK] [CTE] [SBS]

    CSCE 297 TOPICS IN COMMUNITY STUDIES (1 - 3)

    Exploration of topics in Community Studies or Civic Engagement. the actual topic of the course will appear in the schedule of classes. Prerequisite: Depends on course topic and level of difficulty.

    CSCE 300 COMMUNITY CASE STUDIES (3)

    Focuses on reading the core philosophy and history of community studies and applying the abstract concepts to a number of case studies of successful problem-solving organizations. Students examine one organization in depth, analyze the issues the organization addresses, identify the assets it draws upon and evaluate the solutions it develops.

    CSCE 301 INTRODUCTION TO NONPROFIT LEADERSHIP (3)

    Introduces students to personal and professional competencies relevant to careers in nonprofit organizations. Special emphasis is placed on individual and community development as the pivotal functions of nonprofit organizations and on collaboration as the central mode of public problem-solving.

    CSCE 302 FUNDRAISING AND GRANT WRITING (3)

    Provides students with a thorough grounding in the principles and practices of fundraising and grant proposal development. The course is structured to mirror the process of fundraising management and by the course's conclusion, students will have developed a fundraising plan or a grant proposal for their own nonprofit organization or a case study of the organization. The course considers planning frameworks and a variety of conceptual tools exploring donor behaviors ( the underlying psychology and sociology) and each major form of fundraising. The course concludes with an examination of the critical managerial and sectoral issues impacting fundraising functions, such as campaign integration, benchmarking of performance, and public trust and confidence.

    CSCE 306 LEADERSHIP FOR SOCIAL CHANGE (3)

    Introduces students to leadership theory and to the history and concepts of community organizing for social change. Encourages careful analysis of responsibilities and commitment in the context of leadership for the common good and for purposeful change. Students explore how to create change in society through everyday acts of leadership and by learning about their own leadership styles. Provides opportunities for practical application, documentation of leadership styles, and reflection on individual responsibility for and potential in leadership roles. Prerequisite: None.

    CSCE 311 SOCIAL AWARENESS AND ETHICAL RESPONSIBLITY (3)

    Focuses on the relationships among ethics, public policy and business enterprise. Designed to help participants think globally about diversity and civic engagement, this course continues students' preparation for leadership position in a global society. Focuses on improving personal leadership skills and on emphasizing the importance of leading consistently with the highest ethical principles and values. Prerequisite: None

    CSCE 315 COMMUNITY ORGANIZATIONS IN A DIGITAL WORLD (3)

    Examines digital and online efforts of community organizations to build community leadership and civic engagement. Explores the ways in which information technologies have transformed and are transforming community organizations and how these technologies affect a range of social, political and economic issues from individual to organizational and societal levels. Focuses on how technological applications may provide more effective and efficient pathways for community organizations to communicate with their stakeholders and to reach their strategic goals, which include the use of social media. Prerequisite: None.

    CSCE 400 NONPROFIT MANAGEMENT (3)

    Nonprofit organizations are key to the functioning of civil society. The United States has one of the world’s most vibrant nonprofit communities. In this practical skills course, students examine how to carry out the responsibilities of organizing and managing a nonprofit, with focus on organizations framed under 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code. Students explore effective mission, incorporation and vision statements; board and staff roles and relationships; ethics; budgets and fundraising; and maintaining nonprofit status. This course helps students meet a number of American Humanics competency requirements. prerequisite: CSCE 301 or permission of the CSCE program director

    CSCE 401 Economic and Community Development (3)

    Using theory and practice, this course emphasizes the programs and policies that enhance the economic vitality of low- and moderate-income communities and organizations to provide an understanding of the basis for both economic and community development along with a basic set of practical tools to enable the student to work in the field of community development. This course features a service-learning component.

    CSCE 412 COMMUNITY LEADERSHIP AND DECISION-MAKING (3)

    Designed to provide students with the competencies necessary to be an effective community leader and decision-maker in the context of community planning, relationship building across networks and social organizing. Students are exposed to public decision-making from local to national government. Examines the primary skills needed for effective engagement in political and civic discussion, deliberation, advocacy and action. Prerequisite: None.

    CSCE 481 COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT EXPERIENCE (3)

    Provides students with the opportunity to become involved in the work of a community organization. The goal of the course is to provide students with a community engagement experience for up to 120 hours. Writing assignments and reflection activities required. Prerequisite: CSCE 200, 300, and 306.

    CSCE 482 CAPSTONE SEMINAR (3)

    Focuses on the integration of concepts and ideas drawn from each of the core course requirements. Each student develops an original capstone project based on a real world problem/ solution in collaboration with a community organization. The capstone project will be designed in consultation with the CSCE program director. Permission of program director required. Prereq: CSCE 200, 300, 301, 302, 306, 311, 315, 400, 412, and 481.

    CSCE 492 INDEPENDENT STUDY (3)

    Provides students with the opportunity to pursue a research topic or community service project in depth over the course of a semester. An interested student submits a proposal to a faculty member who agrees to be the adviser for the study. The faculty member and the student negotiate the terms of study and the requirements for the final product. prerequisite: permission of the program director

    CSCE 493 HONORS SEMINAR (3)

    An advanced interdisciplinary seminar that focuses on important books and issues, encourages independent thinking, clear presentation, and an understanding of the concerns and methods of various disciplines. The course may be team taught; topic and instructor(s) may change from semester to semester. Course may be repeated for credit when topic changes. Prerequisites: 3.5 GPA and permission of the Honors Director.

    CSCE 494 HONORS PROJECT (3 - 6)

    Directed individual instruction in an advanced project of the student’s choice; the project must be academically related to this discipline. Each student works closely with a faculty director who guides his/her progress. The project must be of honors quality and must be finally approved by both the faculty director and a second faculty member. Course is eligible for a continuing studies grade. prerequisites: 3.3 3.5 GPA and permission of both the Denit Honors Program director and the faculty director

    CSCE 497 SPECIAL TOPICS IN COMMUNITY STUDIES AND CIVIL ENGAGEMENT (3)

    An examination of a selected topic or issue related to the research interests of CSCE faculty or a collaboration with a local nonprofit in a one-time community project. Course may be repeated for credit when topic changes.

  • COSC: Computer Science

    COSC 100 INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTER TECHNOLOGIES (3)

    An introduction to computer hardware and software and their uses. Introduces students to how computers, networks and the Internet work, how they impact our lives and the ethical implications of information technologies. Hands-on experience with a variety of computer applications, including spreadsheet, presentation, database application and Internet tools. Laboratory fee required. [COSC] [ELECGE] [TF]

    COSC 150 INTRODUCTION TO GAME DESIGN (3)

    Covers beginning concepts in game studies, theory and non-digital game design. Topics will be applied to the production of game and simulation development projects. Note: Additional lab time outside of class may be required to complete course projects. Lab fee required.

    COSC 151 COMPUTER PROGRAMMING I (3)

    A fundamental programming course focused on developing computational skills in problem-solving, algorithm development and program design, and principles of good programming. Topics include program flowcharting, pseudo-coding, input / output techniques, control structures, data types, modularization, procedures and file handling. A high-level programming language will be introduced and used throughout the course to supplement the theoretical foundations. prerequisite: none [TF]

    COSC 155 INTERNET TECHNOLOGIES: MASTERING THE BASICS (3)

    Provides an introduction to the Internet, as well as technologies used to generate and maintain Web pages, such as FTP, HTML, CSS, JavaScript and XML. Note: Additional lab time outside of class may be required to complete course projects. Laboratory fee required.

    COSC 160 GRAPHICS FOR GAME DESIGN (3)

    Introduces 2-D computer graphics, including image generation, capture and processing. Particular emphasis on applications to interactive multimedia and computer game design. Provides basis for further study in 3-D graphics. Note: Additional lab time outside of class may be required to complete course projects. Laboratory fee required.

    COSC 210 COMPUTER HARDWARE / SOFTWARE SUPPORT (3)

    Introduces students to the architecture and hardware components of modern computing systems such as PCs, servers and portable/mobile devices. Topics include hardware components and peripherals, installation, configuration and upgrading, diagnosing and troubleshooting, safety and preventive maintenance, portable systems, installation and optimization of system software, and basic networking. Course materials also prepare students for the vendor-neutral CompTIA A+ industry certification exam. Lab fee required. Prerequisite: None

    COSC 212 INTRODUCTION TO LINUX (3)

    Provides the conceptual knowledge and hands-on skills necessary to work with the current distributions of the Linux operating system. Topics include open source software, Linux installation and system software, common commands, tools and utilities, file systems management, basic administration, process management, network and service configurations, application installation and writing of simple shell scripts. Course materials prepare students for the vendor-neutral CompTIA Linux + industry certification exam. Lab fee required. Prerequisite: None

    COSC 250 GAME SCRIPTING (3)

    Advances a student's knowledge of game software design by examining advanced functions, variable types, software design tools and programming concepts. Expands upon materials covered in COSC150: Introduction to Game Design while also introducing students to more complex types of data and programming structures. Introduces students to the software design process and focuses on developing good software design habits as well as advanced knowledge of programming techniques. By the end of the course, students are able to implement more fully their game design ideas in a software prototype. Lab fee required Prerequisite: COSC 150 or equivalent.

    COSC 251 COMPUTER PROGRAMMING II (3)

    Introduces the syntax of an object-oriented language and teaches object-oriented programming concepts and design. To teach these concepts, the course presents an object-oriented programming language such as Java, C#, or C++, while developing problem-solving and algorithm design skills. Lab fee required. prerequisite: COSC 151 or equivalent

    COSC 260 INTRODUCTION TO 3D GRAPHICS (3)

    Introduces students to modeling,texturing, lighting, rendering and simple animation using industry-standard tools. Provides a foundation for further work with sophisticated 3-D imaging tools. Additional lab time outside of class may be required to complete course projects. Lab fee required. prerequisite: COSC 160, CMAT 212 or equivalent.

    COSC 297 TOPICS IN COMPUTER SCIENCE (3)

    Explores issues, concepts and methods in computer science. Content varies depending upon the interest of faculty and students Course may be repeated when topic changes.

    COSC 310 FUNDAMENTALS OF COMPUTER NETWORKS (3)

    An introduction to computer networks, including network operating system concepts. Topics include network components, layered network architectures, topologies, network protocols, Ethernet, wireless transmission, local area networks, wide area networks, switching and routing, network configuration and troubleshooting. Course also prepares students for CompTIA's Network+ certification exam. Lab Fee required. Prerequisite : COSC 210 or equivalent

    COSC 312 ADMINISTERING AND SUPPORTING A NETWORK OPERATING SYSTEM (3)

    Prepares students to install, configure, administer and troubleshoot the current version of Microsoft Windows Server network operating system. Topics include setting up user and group accounts; securing network resources; auditing resources and events; monitoring network resources; backing up and restoring data; managing system policies, file systems and fault tolerance; interoperating between network operating systems; implementing network clients and directory replication; managing/ implementing disaster recovery; and troubleshooting. Lab fee required. prerequisite: COSC 310

    COSC 315 PROGRAMMING FOR INTERACTIVE DESIGN (3)

    An introduction to object-oriented computer programming framed in the technical aspects of game programming. The course covers variables, control structures, functions, arrays, data types, classes, inheritance and polymorphisms. Students apply these concepts to build a series of small games. Laboratory fee required. Prerequisite: COSC 250 or equivalent and Simulation and Game Design major.

    COSC 320 GAME CONCEPT AND DESIGN (3)

    An introduction to major genres, technologies and theories underlying contemporary computer games and to the business and economics of game design. Builds technical understanding as well as historical and cultural perspective in which games are seen as more than escapist entertainment. Students analyze and critique classic and contemporary games of various kinds, learning basics of interactive authoring and play design by building game levels, modifications and other applied projects. Lab fee required. COSC 150 and COSC 250, or equivalent.

    COSC 324 DESIGNING FOR HUMANS (3)

    Introduces key concepts of human/computer interaction, including how humans interact with technology to find and process information. It also introduces the concepts of systematic software testing to students of applied information technology and students of interactive simulation and computer gaming. Students learn principles of interface and software construction and apply them to practical problems of software or game evaluation in the process of learning principles that underlie good interaction and play design. Readings cover theory of human/computer interaction, interaction design and usability testing. Laboratory fee required. [IL]

    COSC 330 GAMES FOR LEARNING (3)

    Conveys the skills necessary for students to begin a career in instructional video game design. Expands on previous game design courses but focuses on the creation of serious games for adult and child learning. At the end of the course, students design, develop and test a working prototype of a video game for learning. Lab fee required. prerequisite: COSC 150 or equivalent, by permission of the program director

    COSC 332 FUNDAMENTALS OF COMPUTER SECURITY (3)

    Introduces students to core principles and practices in computer and network security. Covers the fundamentals of computer/network security including general security concepts; threats and vulnerabilities; application, data and host security; access control and identity management; basics of cryptography; and compliance and operational/organizational security. Current topics in computer security such as cloud computing security and application programming development security also are discussed. Course materials prepare students for the vendor-neutral CompTIA Security+ industry certification exam. Lab fee required. Prerequisite: COSC 210 or equivalent. [GD]

    COSC 351 OBJECT ORIENTED PROGRAMMING (3)

    Introduces abstract data types, as well as generic classes and methods, complexity and algorithms. It also focuses on the design and implementation of object-oriented data structures. The course is based on an object-oriented programming language such as Java, C#, or C++. Proficiency in an object-oriented programming language is required. Lab fee required. prerequisite: COSC 251 or equivalent . [TF]

    COSC 356 DATABASE SYSTEMS (3)

    Introductory course to database design and implementation. Topics include modeling using Entity-Relationship (E-R) diagrams, query formulation with Structured Query Language (SQL), database planning and design, normalization, creating and maintaining a database administration. Basic concepts of the relational data model and SQL are discussed in detail. Students plan, design and test a relational database and associated application components. They also obtain hands-on experience using a current version of Microsoft SQL Server Database Management System or another system. Lab fee required.. Prerequisite: COSC 251.

    COSC 370 LEVEL DESIGN (3)

    Builds on an existing understanding of game design concepts, scripting and 3-D asset creation and provides students with the opportunity to apply this to advanced level design utilizing professional tool sets. Projects are team based and emulate industry best practices using a current 3-D game engine. lab fee required, prerequisites: COSC 150, COSC 250, and COSC 260 or their equivalents

    COSC 390 GAME JOURNALISM (3)

    Focuses on building the reporting and writing skills needed to write game reviews and other video game-related news articles. Students regularly practice writing game-related pieces and develop their critical analysis skills through peer review; they are expected to learn through practice, peer review and review of existing published works. Topics covered include: What is journalism and how does game journalism differ? How do the elements of video games translate to written works, and how does one translate game concepts to a general reading audience? Lab fee required. prerequisite: COSC 150 or equivalent

    COSC 401 THE TCP/IP PROTOCOL SUITE (3)

    Introduces students to the TCP/IP suite of communication protocols. Topics include fundamentals, basic and advanced IP addressing, TCP/IP routing, TCP/IP name resolution, TCP/IP tools, dynamic P/IP configuration tools, WINS, NetBIOS, Internet/intranet services, printing and RAS, network management, and monitoring and troubleshooting. Laboratory fee required. prerequisite: COSC 310

    COSC 402 INTERACTIVE NARRATIVE (3)

    Covers advanced principles of creating interactive narrative experiences, from creative writing to storyboarding and interaction design. Focuses on examples of successful and experimental interactive narrative from across media, including video games,electronic literature, interactive fiction and gamebooks. lab fee required. prerequisite: COSC 150

    COSC 405 THE BUSINESS OF GAME DEVELOPMENT (3)

    Examines the past, present and future of the video game industry, with an emphasis on business organizations and practices that have evolved along with the medium. Particular attention is given to opportunities and requirements for new ventures in games and other areas of interactive design. Laboratory fee required.

    COSC 407 SOCIAL MEDIA AND GAMES (3)

    Examines games and simulations as systems designed for common use and collaboration and the ways non-game social media can promote markets for digital entertainment. Theoretical approaches are compared to current implementations and tested in one or more limited practical experiments. Laboratory fee required. Prerequisite: WRIT 300

    COSC 408 HISTORY OF VIDEO GAMES (3)

    This course surveys the history of video games, from the first experiments in the decades following World War II, to the current era of consoles and network games. Despite being a relatively recent medium, video games have already undergone significant evolution from their earliest roots. We will be examining these transformations in terms of art, narrative, graphics, audio and game mechanics. Throughout the course, we will position these trends within the cultural roles games have played and speculate on the future of the form. Lab fee required. Prerequisite: WRIT 300

    COSC 410 3-D MODELING (3)

    Improves an existing understanding of 3-D modeling, texturing and animation for interactive simulation applications, including scenic and character design for computer games. Practical assignments allow students to advance skills in industry-standard programs (e.g., 3D Studio and Maya). Readings, critical examples and visits from industry experts provide broader contexts for skills. Laboratory fee required. prerequisite: COSC 260

    COSC 412 UNIX / LINUX ADMINISTRATION (3)

    Students develop skills required to administer the Unix /Linux operating systems. Topics include installing and configuring a popular distribution, common tools and utilities, file system administration, user and group management, network / Internet service configuration, user and system security, shell scripting, kernel configurations, interoperability with Windows, back-up and storage, and troubleshooting. Lab fee required. prerequisite: COSC 212, COSC 251 and MATH 201.

    COSC 414 Audio Integration in Games and Simulations (3)

    Concentrates on the design of sound elements for use in computer games and other forms of interactive simulation. Practical design exercises based on standard production software and popular game engines are combined with theoretical readings, critical studies and visits from industry experts. Laboratory fee required.

    COSC 418 DESIGN OF MULTIPLAYER GAMES (3)

    Examines the design principles and challenges underlying games and interactive simulations designed to be used collaboratively or in situations of simultaneous use, from multiplayer console games to massively multiplayer Internet games and their associated virtual communities. Assignments include development of modules or levels for popular multiplayer games and systematic study of Internet game communities. Laboratory fee required.

    COSC 420 3D PRODUCTION (3)

    Builds on 3-D design concepts learned in COSC 260: Introduction to 3-D Graphics and COSC 410: 3-D Modeling to explore cutting-edge, industry-standard techniques for the creation of 3-D game graphics and animation. Projects focus on emerging technologies and practices and on optimization of models for real-time simulations. Students are required to apply creatively an advanced understanding of 3-D modeling to portfolio- quality work. Additional lab time outside of class may be required to complete course projects. Prerequisite: COSC 260 and COSC 410 or their equivalents

    COSC 424 INTERACTION DESIGN FOR GAMES (3)

    Advances a student's knowledge of game software design by examining interaction and interface design concepts as they relate to game design. Introduces students to human-computer interaction concepts pertaining to game design through the examination of input devices, on-screen displays, feedback to the user, and usability research. Students demonstrate their knowledge by generating game interfaces and interaction design that involves developing and user-testing a prototype game during the semester. Lab Fee Required. prerequisite: COSC 324

    COSC 430 LEGAL ISSUES IN HIGH TECHNOLOGY CRIME (3)

    Examines the general regulations, general and computer-related law, and ethics and business policies, associated with high technology crime. Areas of major focus include description of legal issues facing management and administration, traditional search and seizure as well as privacy issues, manager and supervisor responsibilities, criminal issues and definitions, chain of custody and ethical considerations. Problem-oriented course that focuses on applying the holdings of cases and analyses of statutes to different criminal fact patterns. prerequisite : none

    COSC 432 INFORMATON ASSURANCE (3)

    Provides an introduction to the various technical and administrative aspects of information security and assurance. Discusses the foundation for understanding the key issues associated with protecting information assets, determining the levels of protection and response to security incidents, and designing a consistent, reasonable information security system with appropriate intrusion detection and reporting features. Ethical, legal and professional issues in information security are also discussed. Students develop familiarity with research and information resources to forecast emerging problems and strategies in this area. Laboratory fee required. prerequisite: COSC 310 and COSC 332

    COSC 433 NETWORK SECURITY (3)

    Deals with the conceptual and technological aspects of network security. The course begins with a review of various forms of network attacks, including scanning, exploits and denial-of-service attacks. It discusses the role of major networking devices, including routers, firewall technology and servers, in establishing a secure network. It provides a comprehensive overview of building and maintaining firewalls in a business environment. It discusses how to make an intelligent choice of firewall technology and firewall planning/design and presents basic firewall troubleshooting. It also covers security policy development, authentication, encryption, VPNs and IDSs. Laboratory fee required. prerequisite: COSC 310 and COSC 332

    COSC 434 WEB AND DATABASE SECURITY (3)

    Introduces the security challenges and threats in database/Web-based systems. Students learn how to describe and apply security principles and technologies and how to implement them across various database/Web systems. In addition, advanced topics related to database/ Web systems such as e-commerce security, security problems in data warehousing and data mining are introduced. Lab fee required. Pre-requisite: COSC 155, COSC 332, and COSC 356.

    COSC 435 DIGITAL FORENSICS FOR INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY (3)

    Introduces students to computer forensics and investigation and examines the digital footprints left behind by the use or misuse of computer systems and networks. Exposes students to current techniques, tools and best practice in securing, collecting, processing, examining and presenting digital evidence. Lab fee required. prerequisite: COSC 310 and COSC 332.

    COSC 440 FRONTIERS OF GAME DESIGN (3)

    Focuses on one or more emerging technologies or practices likely to shape the video game industry in the next three to five years. Students both investigate the history and rationale of the innovation and develop practical experiments or proofs of concept indicating possible applications. Laboratory fee required. COSC 250 or COSC 315 or equivalent, and Simulation and Digital Entertainment (SDE) major.

    COSC 450 SDE INTERNSHIP (3)

    Provides students with hands-on work experience in applied simulation and game development. Students may arrange placement with an external organization, subject to written approval by the instructor and an official of the organization. Alternatively, students may participate in an in-house project managed by the instructor. In the latter case, students attend regular class meetings as part of their project work. Laboratory fee required.

    COSC 451 OBJECT-ORIENTED ANALYSIS AND DESIGN (3)

    Presents concepts and techniques in the development of robust design models and of applications of the United Modeling Language to fundamental object-oriented analysis and design concepts, including architecture, objects, classes, components, relationships, and supporting diagrams. Lab fee required. Prerequisite: COSC 351

    COSC 452 Internship in Simulation and Digital Entertainment: Production and Design (3)

    Internship course intended to give students professional experience in software reliability and play testing in computer games and other areas of applied interactive simulation. Students are assigned projects in area industries or in an on-campus development facility to be developed with local companies. Laboratory fee required.

    COSC 453 ADVANCED WEB DEVELOPMENT (3)

    Presents a detailed study of the methods and technologies for building highly interactive websites and other Web-based applications. Principles for building websites that exhibit usability, security and maintainability are presented. Students learn scripting, coding and utilizing website development tools to enhance the performance and functionality of a website. Technologies such as HTML5, XML and Ajax are introduced. Requires students to build multiple Web pages and implement a major website/ Web application in phases. Lab fee required. prerequisites: COSC 155 or its equivalent and COSC 351

    COSC 456 ADVANCED DATABASE SYSTEMS (3)

    Covers advanced topics in database systems, intended to help students understand storage and indexes, query processing and optimization, transaction management, concurrency control, database administration and security, data warehousing concepts, OLAP and data mining, and distributed database and replication. Lab fee required. prerequisite: COSC 356

    COSC 457 MOBILE APPLICATIONS PROGRAMMING (3)

    Introduces students to mobile application programming and provides an understanding of the underlying wireless architecture and infrastructure in native environments. Discusses various aspects of mobile applications and design patterns, and students gain hands-on development experience with at least one mobile platform. Lab fee required. prerequisite: COSC 351 or equivalent.

    COSC 460 GAMES, SIMULATIONS, AND SOCIETY (3)

    Examines the nature of games and how they are framed by and impact individuals and groups. Topics include scholarly work on online economies and community building, fan cultures and their creative reworking of game content, the role of play in human culture and the relationships between online and offline identity, as well as psychological facets of games. Laboratory fee required.

    COSC 461 IT PROJECT MANAGEMENT (3)

    Introduces the concepts and practices associated with IT project management and helps students understand how successful IT projects are effectively managed so that projects are completed on time, within budget and meeting customer's needs. Teaches students the key processes, from project initiation to project closure. Students gain working experience with the latest versions of the most popular project management software and tools available to project managers. Lab fee required. prerequisites: none

    COSC 469 GAME DEVELOPMENT PROJECT I (3)

    Constitutes the first part of the capstone experience in the Simulation and Digital Entertainment major. Students work through design assignments to practice project management and team coordination. They also research and propose individual project concepts, some of which are selected for group development as the final course project and for further work in Game Development Project II. Laboratory fee required. prerequisites: Simulation and Game Design major with senior status

    COSC 470 GAME DEVELOPMENT PROJECT II (3)

    Provides the capstone experience for students in the Simulation and Digital Entertainment major. Working with faculty and visiting industry experts, students propose a concept for a computer game or applied interactive simulation, developing that concept over the course of the semester through several stages of specification and prototyping. Theoretical readings and critical studies of existing games provide insight and context. Final prototypes are presented publicly at the end of the course. Lab fee required. prerequisite: COSC 469 and Simulation and Game Design major with senior status. [OC]

    COSC 477 COMMUNITY -FOCUSED GAME DESIGN (3)

    Students collaborate with the community to build a game focused on solving a problem or addressing a community need. Possible projects can incorporate a range of digital and communication skill sets and might include physical games (card,board), alternate or augmented reality, browser-based games, simulations or other forms as appropriate to the project. Lab fee required. prerequisite: COSC 150

    COSC 490 PRACTICUM IN INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY (3)

    Provides students with hands-on work experience in applied information technology. Students may arrange placement with an external organization, subject to written approval by the instructor and an official of the organization. Alternatively, students may participate in an in-house project managed by the instructor. In the latter case, students attend regular class meetings as part of their project work. Laboratory fee required. prerequisites: COSC 461 and at least 3 courses in the student's chosen track [OC]

    COSC 493 HONORS SEMINAR (3)

    An advanced interdisciplinary seminar that focuses on important books and issues, encourages independent thinking, clear presentation, and an understanding of the concerns and methods of various disciplines. The course may be team taught; topic and instructor(s) may change from semester to semester. Course may be repeated for credit when topic changes. Prerequisites: 3.5 GPA and permission of the Honors Director

    COSC 494 HONORS PROJECT (3 - 6)

    Directed individual instruction in an advanced project of the student’s choice; the project must be academically related to this discipline. Each student works closely with a faculty director who guides his/her progress. The project must be of honors quality and must be finally approved by both the faculty director and a second faculty member. Course is eligible for a continuing studies grade. Laboratory fee may be required. prerequisites: 3.5 GPA and permission of both the Denit Honors Program director and the faculty director

    COSC 497 TOPICS IN COMPUTER SCIENCE (3)

    Intensive exploration of topics in computer science of mutual interest to faculty and students. Content varies according to the current interests of faculty and students. The topic for study appears under that name in the class schedule. Course may be repeated for credit when topic changes. Laboratory fee required.

    COSC 499 INDEPENDENT STUDY (1 - 3)

    The pursuit of independent study under the supervision of a full-time faculty member. The number of credits to be earned is determined by the supervising faculty member before the study begins. Students may earn up to 3 credits for this independent study. Laboratory fee required. prerequisite: varies; see class schedule or instructor

  • CRJU: Criminal Justice

    CRJU 200 CRIMINAL JUSTICE (3)

    Examines the fundamental concepts of the criminal justice field; the history, philosophy, social development and operations of police, courts, and corrections in a democratic society; and criminal justice careers. Prerequisite: None. [SOSC] [QQT] [GIK] [SBS]

    CRJU 220 POLICE AND SOCIETY (3)

    This course is an overview, designed to examine law enforcement service delivery at the local, state and federal levels of government. Special emphasis wil be placed upon the historical development of the law enforcement role in contemporary society and how it shapes the type of law enforcement service that can be expected in the future. Prerequisite: Not Applicable

    CRJU 301 THE CONTEMPORARY CRIMINAL JUSTICE SYSTEM (3)

    A critical analysis of the contemporary criminal justice system. Political, economic, and societal contexts provide the framework for an examination of system-wide issues, current problems, and challenges facing the criminal justice system. Prerequisite: CRJU 200 or equivalent.

    CRJU 302 CRIMINAL JUSTICE RESEARCH METHODS (3)

    A survey of the research methods and techniques utilized within the field of criminal justice and criminology. Topics discussed include research designs, sampling, data collection, ­quantitative versus qualitative methods, and applications to criminal justice planning and administration.

    CRJU 304 CJ PROFESSIONAL STUDIES (3)

    Assists students with criminal justice database technologies and with writing and research skills specific to the field of criminal justice. Contains units on conducting secondary research, learning to write for the academic setting (e.g., literature reviews, empirical studies) versus the applied setting (e.g., case summaries, incident reports) and preparing for a career in criminal justice. prerequisite: passing of Upper Division Writing Placement Test prior to enrolling in CRJU 304 and course must be taken within the first 18 credits of the major. SCJ students who earn a B+ or better in WRIT 300 are exempt from taking CRJU 304. Students who are exempt will instead be required to take an additional 3 credit elective. [IL]

    CRJU 306 CRIMINOLOGICAL PERSPECTIVES (3)

    The major paradigms, models, and theories that form the foundation of criminal justice and criminology are examined. Using current texts, journals, and reports, the course examines the range of explanations of criminal ­behavior, focusing on attempts to ­integrate ­perspectives and theories.

    CRJU 320 POLICE ADMINISTRATION (3)

    Study of line and staff functions in police organizations. Examination of organization principles, management functions, and organizational behavior as they relate to police agencies. Emphasis upon the behavioral science approach to supervising and managing police personnel.

    CRJU 330 CRIMINAL LAW (3)

    An examination of the general and specific parts of the substantive criminal law in the United States, its development within historical an societal contexts, and its representation in statutory and case law. Consideration is given to problems of application and interpretation of the written law.

    CRJU 334 CRIMINAL PROCEDURES (3)

    This course is designed to present the principles and applications of procedural criminal law in the United States. Such procedural laws are supplemented by rules of evidence and decisions of the U.S. Supreme Court on key constitutional questions. Prerequisite: CRJU 200 Criminal Justice or equivalent.

    CRJU 341 CORRECTIONAL PERSPECTIVES (3)

    Introduces students to the history, role, functions, problems, and contemporary practices of correctional facilities, including prisons, jails, and community corrections, e.g., probation and parole, and the role and difficulties of inmates and correctional officers.

    CRJU 390 VICTIMOLOGY (3)

    An introduction to the study of crime victims. Examines the victim's role in crime, the criminal justice system's handling of victims, and victim services. Prerequisite: CRJU 301.

    CRJU 392 THE TRAUMA OF VICTIMIZATION (3)

    Provides the foundation for understanding the trauma of victimization; examines the impact of trauma and describes the short and long term effects of trauma; and explains how past trauma can lead to ongoing problem behaviors. Develops skills and increases awareness of the necessary core competencies in trauma-informed services and administration. prerequisite: none

    CRJU 394 MULTI-DISCIPLINARY PERSPECTIVES ON INTERPERSONAL VIOLENCE (3)

    Examines the complicated nature and dynamics of interpersonal violence. Presents a general overview of interpersonal violence, such as definitions, characteristics, and theoretical models; and various sources of data on interpersonal violence and measurement issues. Provides the historical development and evolution of the multidisciplinary response to interpersonal violence including law enforcement response, specialized courts, and treatment programs; civil actions; and the role of community and human service agencies. Current issues and innovations related to interpersonal violence are integrates throughout the course. prerequisite: none

    CRJU 396 CONTEMPORARY ISSUES FOR VICTIMS OF CRIME (3)

    Analysis of crime and social reaction from the point of view of those who are offended, the crime victims. The course focuses on the relatively recent emphasis on how crime creates problems for those victimized by criminals and analysis of whole populations victimized by persons known to them. Analysis of contemporary issues relating to crime victimization as they have evolved based on legal, political, and social changes. prerequisite: none

    CRJU 398 BEST PRACTICES FOR VICTIM SERVICES (3)

    Introduces the emerging field of victim services in context with the underlying legal structure of victims' rights. The system of victim services both within the criminal justice system and through other allied professions are examined. Best practices in victim assistance programs -from law enforcement through the courts and corrections systems to financial remedies, community-based advocacy, and treatment and support services -are also reviewes. prerequiste: none

    CRJU 400 A DIALOGUE WITH A VICTIM (3)

    Provides a critical and in-depth review of some of the communication barriers criminal justice personnel will encounter when interacting with victims and witnesses in the course of an investigation. Particular attention is spent critically examining the competing narratives (e.g., individual, professional, personal, cultural) that often present when interviewing a victim/ witness, and how those narratives can impede the flow of communication and the investigative process. Strategies to reduce these obstacles are explored. Prerequisite: None

    CRJU 404 COMPARATIVE CRIMINAL JUSTICE (3)

    Examines comparative criminal justice: how different societies around the world practice criminal justice relative to practices in the United States. Multi­disciplinary approach considers the economic, governmental, geographical, and social situations in the selected countries. Prerequisite CRJU 301 [GD]

    CRJU 406 POLITICAL TERRORISM (3)

    An overview of the definitional and conceptual issues, types, history, causes and effects of oppositional political terrorism. The events of Sept. 11, including its major actors such as Osama bin Laden, al-Qaeda and the Taliban, are explored, including the reaction to this event by the United States and its allies over the past decade. The course then looks at the changes that have occurred since. Prerequisite: CRJU 301

    CRJU 408 CRIME AND DELINQUENCY PREVENTION (3)

    A review of major crime and delinquency prevention strategies, including punitive, mechanical, and corrective prevention policies and programs. Selected prevention programs and policies are highlighted for in-depth evaluation. Prerequisite: CRJU 301.

    CRJU 420 SPEC PROBS IN POLICING (3)

    Issues and problems in policing a free society. The role and ­function of the police, the effects of ­contemporary police practices, the ­exercise and control of police power. Examination of current problems and proposals for reform Prerequisite: CRJU 301

    CRJU 430 JUVENILE JUSTICE (3)

    An examination of youthful law violation and the juvenile justice system. The ­history, law, operations and agencies of juvenile justice are analyzed as are alternative approaches to defining, preventing and responding to youthful law violation.

    CRJU 432 CRIMINAL COURTS (3)

    An exploration of the multidisciplinary ­literature on the criminal courts in the United States, focusing on the social, political, and organizational contexts of the court, the court’s case flow, and the various actors in the court’s process. Contemporary issues are highlighted. Prerequisite: CRJU 301

    CRJU 441 SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN CORRECTION (3)

    In-depth analysis of the issues, problems, and suggested reforms facing the contemporary role and practices of correctional facilities, including prisons, jails, and community corrections, e.g., probation and parole, and the role, functions, and difficulties of inmates and correctional officers. Prerequisite: CRJU 301 or CRJU 341

    CRJU 442 COMMUNITY CORRECTIONS (3)

    An examination of practices and ­problems of community corrections, including but not limited to probation, parole, halfway houses, and fines. Prerequisite: CRJU 301 or CRJU 341

    CRJU 445 THE INSIDE-OUT PRISON EXCHANGE PROGRAM (3)

    Inside-Out brings "outside" students -college undergraduates and graduates, particularly those pursuing careers in criminal justice and related fields together with "inside" students -incarcerated men and women -to study as peers behind prison walls. The semester-long course provides a trans formative experience that allows the outside students to contextualize and rethink what they have learned in the classroom, gaining insights that will help them pursue the work of creating an effective, humane, restorative criminal justice system. prerequisites: none

    CRJU 451 MINORITIES, CRIME AND JUSTICE (3)

    An analysis of race, ethnicity and gender issues and how they impact the criminal justice system. An examination of how race, ethnicity, and gender issues revolve around questions associated with evidence of dsparity, disproportionality and discrimination within the criminal justice system.

    CRJU 454 CRIMINAL BEHAVIOR (3)

    An examination of selected types of crime or criminal behavior patterns, such as white collar crime, violent crime, organized crime, drugs and crime, or age and crime. The topic studied appears in the Class Schedule. CRJU 454 may be repeated for credit when the topic changes. Prerequisite: CRJU 301

    CRJU 456 DRUGS AND CRIME (3)

    An examination of various topics and issues relating drugs and crime in the United States. This course explores social, legal, medical, and political factors, as well as changes in attitudes that contribute to drug use and policy. Prominent drugs-crime issues and projections for the future are included. Prerequisite: CRJU 301 Social Justice in the Urban Community

    CRJU 464 CRIMINAL JUSTICE ISSUES (3)

    An examination of a selected topic or issue, such as women and criminal justice, private security, cirminal justice legislation, or ethical issues. The topic studied will appear in the Schedule of Classes. CRJU 464 may be repeated for credit when the topic changes. Prerequisite: CRJU 301 Social Justice in the Urban Community

    CRJU 485 ADVANCED CRIMINAL JUSTICE STUDIES (3)

    The senior level ­capstone experience. The focus is multi-disciplinary, and the emphasis is on the ­integration and application of theory, research methods, and statistics. The problems of data gathering and reporting, and relationships of theory, research, and practice in the field are addressed. Prerequisites: CRJU 301, 302, 304,306, and MATH 115.

    CRJU 490 CRIMINAL JUSTICE INTERNSHIP (3)

    A practicum designed to broaden the educational experience of students through appropriate observational and work assignments with criminal justice agencies. Correlation of theoretical knowledge with practice emphasized. Prerequisite: CRJU 301, senior status, and consent of instructor. This course may be taken for a continuing studies (CS) grade.

    CRJU 493 HONORS SEMINAR (3)

    An advanced interdisciplinary seminar that focuses on important books and issues, encourages independent thinking, clear presentation, and an understanding of the concerns and methods of various disciplines. The course may be team taught; topic and instructor(s) may change from semester to semester. Course may be repeated for credit when topic changes. Prerequisites: 3.3 GPA and permission of the Honors Director.

    CRJU 494 HONORS PROJECT (3 - 6)

    Directed individual instruction in an advanced project of the student’s choice; the project must be academically related to this discipline. Each student works closely with a faculty director who guides his/her progress. The project must be of honors quality and must be finally approved by both the faculty director and a second faculty member. Course is eligible for a CS grade. Prerequisite: Honors standing, a 3.3 gpa. and permission of both the Honors Program Director and the faculty director.

    CRJU 498 DIRECTED INDEPENDENT STUDIES (1 - 3)

    Designed to provide credit for a student who wants to pursue independent work under the supervision of a staff member. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. Eligible for Continuing Studies (CS) grade.

    CRJU 499 SENIOR THESIS (3 - 6)

    No course description available.

  • ECON: Economics

    ECON 100 ECONOMICS OF CONTEMPORARY ISSUES (3)

    Provides a survey of societal issues examined through the lens of economic analysis. A scientific approach is adopted in which the basic tools of economics are ¬applied to social issues such as pollution, crime and prevention, poverty and discrimination, professional sports and economic growth. Students gain an appreciation of how society addresses the conflict between unlimited wants and scarce ¬resources. [SOSC] [GIK] [SBS]

    ECON 200 THE ECONOMIC WAY OF THINKING (3)

    An economist sees the world in a unique way and is able to provide a different perspective on many issues. This course presents the “economic way of thinking” with an emphasis on being able to make effective decisions in a wide variety of economic and business situations. In addition, the “economic way of thinking” is used to understand the impact of business and government policies and actions on our daily lives. [SOSC] [QQT] [SBS]

    ECON 305 MANAGERIAL ECONOMICS (3)

    Managers and business professionals need the wide variety of tools provided by economic theory to deal with the many complex issues facing organizations in today’s competitive global markets. This course focuses on the economic forces affecting the process of organizing ­economic activity. The primary tools of analysis are imperfect information, transaction costs, and the voluntary pursuit of efficiency. Prerequisite:ECON 200, or three hours of micro or macro economics , ACCT 202, and OPRE 202

    ECON 308 MONEY AND BANKING (3)

    Money and Banking focuses on financial markets and their interaction with the stability and growth of the U.S. economy. The course will be useful for all undergraduate business majors and will encourage a sound understanding and appreciation of topics frequently cited in the business press.

    ECON 312 INTRODUCTION TO ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT (3)

    This course introduces students to local economic development from the perspective of the real estate industry and economic development professionals. Students will become familiar with theoretical frameworks of urban economies including theories of the location of economic activity and the principles of urban economic development, housing, transportation, poverty, and unemployment and municipal finance. Students are also exposed to economic development finance including the fundamentals of bond finance, tax increment financing, among others. Students will learn specific techniques in assessing local economies for business attraction and retention strategies such as location quotients, shift-share analysis and input-output analysis. While there is no formal pre-requisite, previous coursework in economics is recommended. [GD]

    ECON 409 INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS (3)

    A broad coverage of international issues, providing a starting point for the analysis and insights available from other business disciplines. Topics include the underlying rationale for trade, market mechanisms, efficiency, exchange rates, balance of payments and some aspects of international economic development. prerequisite: ECON 200 or 3 hours of micro- or macroeconomics

    ECON 493 HONORS SEMINAR (3)

    An advanced interdisciplinary seminar that focuses on important books and issues and encourages independent thinking, clear presentation and an understanding of the concerns and methods of various disciplines. The course may be team taught; topic and instructor(s) may change from semester to semester. Course may be repeated for credit when topic changes. prerequisites: 3.3 GPA and permission of the Denit Honors Program director

    ECON 494 HONORS PROJ/THESIS (3 - 6)

    Directed individual instruction in an advanced project of the student's choice; the project must be academically related to this discipline. Each student works closely with a faculty director who guides his/her progress. The project must be of honors quality and must be finally approved by both the faculty director and a second faculty member. Course is eligible for a continuing studies grade. prerequisites: 3.3 GPA and permission of both the Denit Honors Program director and the faculty director

    ECON 497 SPECIAL TOPICS IN ECONOMICS (3)

    The economics and finance faculty, from time to time, offer an opportunity to integrate new material into the undergraduate ­program reflecting changes in the field and in the educational needs of ­students. Prerequisites: ECON 305 and six additional hours of economics.

    ECON 499 INDEPENDENT STUDY: ECONOMICS (1 - 3)

    An independent study completed under the direction of a faculty member. For eligibility and ­procedures, refer to the Merrick School of Business Independent Study Policy.

  • ENGL: English

    ENGL 200 THE EXPERIENCE OF LITERATURE (3)

    Teaches students how to read, understand and appreciate fiction, drama and poetry. Exploration of three major literary genres through close reading of selected works, with attention to the contexts that have shaped them. Understanding and applying literary terms and concepts to written analysis of literary works. [ENGL] [HAT] [AH]

    ENGL 211 POPULAR WRITING (3)

    Explores writing that entertains, informs and persuades. The course includes advertising, journalism, public relations, blogs, political messages, Web content and other mass media. The emphasis is on contemporary writing and writers. The course considers the effects of visual as well as verbal aspects of communication. Students complete several writing assignments in selected forms and styles covered in the course. [COM] [AH]

    ENGL 215 INTRODUCTION TO CREATIVE WRITING (3)

    Introduces students to the creative process and craft of writing poetry and fiction by exploring the elements and techniques of those genres. Students write and share poems and short fiction in a workshop setting. [COM] [AH]

    ENGL 250 EXPLORING LITERATURE (3)

    Readings in the literature of self-discovery, initiation and the quest for identity. Contemporary racial, religious, sexual, sociocultural and class experiences are examined with a look back to their roots in tradition. [ENGL] [HAT] [AH]

    ENGL 296 TOPICS IN WRITING (3)

    Intensive exploration of topics in writing. The topic for study appears in the class schedule. Course may be repeated for credit when topic changes.

    ENGL 297 TOPICS IN ENGLISH (3)

    Intensive exploration of topics in literature or language. The topic for study appears in the class schedule. Course may be repeated for credit when topic changes. [ENGL] [AH]

    ENGL 301 INTRODUCTION TO ENGLISH STUDIES (3)

    Provides a foundation for the English Major and introduces students to English studies through the exploration of fundamental questions related to reading, writing, and the interpretation of texts. Covers creative, professional, and critical writing; basic literary analysis; and cultural and historical timelines. Emphasizes development of students' critical-thinking and written and oral communication skills. Prerequisite: none. [GD]

    ENGL 311 WELLS OF THE PAST: CLASSICAL FOUNDATIONS (3)

    An intensive study of varieties of great literature organized thematically and in terms of ideas connected with periods of important historical or philosophical change. Stressed at present is the age of classical antiquity. Recommended for all students interested in a humanistic and cultural approach to literature and ideas. [HAT] [AH]

    ENGL 313 WORLDS BEYOND THE WEST (3)

    An intensive study of some of the great writing from non-Western literatures. This study may range from the Middle to Far East, from the Orient to Africa. May be repeated for credit when the topic changes. [HAT] [AH]

    ENGL 315 THE SHORT STORY (3)

    An investigation of the various forms a short story may take and the kinds of effects writers have tried to produce. Particular attention is given to authors of the 20th century. [HAT] [AH]

    ENGL 316 MODERN POETRY (3)

    A reading and discussion of 20th-century poetry. Emphasis is given to major works of those poets thought best to define the modern and its diversity of poetic response. [HAT] [AH]

    ENGL 317 THE NOVEL (3)

    Historical overview of the development of the genre of the novel from the 18th to the 21st centuries. Focus on the development of narrative strategies and the role of the novel in the literary marketplace.[HAT] [AH]

    ENGL 319 TOPICS IN INTERNATIONAL LITERATURE (3)

    Readings in global fiction, poetry, and prose. May focus on the literature of one particular region/ country or offer a broader comparative study. May be repeated for credit when the topic changes.

    ENGL 320 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE (3)

    An investigation of trends and ­individual writers of today with respect to their immediacy and possible universality. Varied emphasis on the many different forms of current poetry, drama, and prose. [HAT] [AH]

    ENGL 321 ARGUMENT AND PERSUASION (3)

    For students in all disciplines who wish to develop control and confidence in critical thinking and persuasive writing. Instruction centers on the analysis and production of written arguments on issues of current interest or enduring importance that are enriched by cross-disciplinary perspectives and multiple points of view.

    ENGL 322 TECHNIQUES OF POPULARIZATION (3)

    Techniques and approaches to making technical information clear and understandable to nontechnical audiences. Applicable for students in English, Writing and Digital Communications, as well as those preparing to work in business, law, and other technical and professional fields.

    ENGL 323 WRITING, EDITING AND PUBLISHING (3)

    An introduction to professional writing, editorial concepts and the publication process. Writing and editing for brochures, newsletters and magazines, with special emphasis on audience and purpose. Laboratory fee may be required.

    ENGL 324 PUBLIC RELATIONS WRITING (3)

    Experience in preparing news releases and other promotional materials for print, electronic, online, and other digital media. Students will integrate writing formats, techniques, and skills to engage and motivate target audiences.

    ENGL 325 INTRODUCTION TO JOURNALISM (3)

    An introduction to journalistic writing and overview of trends and developments in the field. Students will learn to research, write, and present various kinds of basic news stories for traditional and digital media. Throughout the course, they will consider the civic, social, and ethical responsibilities of the profession. Prerequisite: none

    ENGL 326 WRITING FOR DIGITAL MEDIA (3)

    Informational and persuasive writing for electronic and digital media. Emphasizes the translation of information, ideas, and experience into various contemporary one-way and interactive presentational formats.

    ENGL 329 TOPICS IN ADVERTISING (3)

    Principles of verbal and visual communication in creating and executing advertising ideas. Evaluation of the strengths and limitations of the many forms available in persuasive communication. May be repeated for credit when the topic changes.

    ENGL 330 LEGAL WRITING & RHETORIC (3)

    Introduces students to the theory and practice of legal discourse by exploring the history of legal rhetoric and learning strategies for reading, writing, and interpreting legal texts. Covers rhetorical conventions, arguments, and analysis; consideration of specific legal audiences and historical exigencies for cases; elements of case briefs, judicial opinions, and legal scholarships; standards for legal research and citation; and special quirks of legal writing. Emphasis is on developments of students' analytical thinking and written communication skills. Prerequisites: none.

    ENGL 331 POPULAR GENRES (3)

    A genre-based approach to one or more popular forms of literature, such as graphic novels, mystery, science fiction, fantasy, or chick lit. Focus on the relationships between the genre and the contexts surrounding its production. May be repeated for credit when the topic changes. Prerequisite: none. [HAT] [AH]

    ENGL 332 LITERATURE AND FILM (3)

    A study of famous and infamous adaptations of literary classics, ancient and modern. The problems involved in adapting one medium of communication to another. Laboratory fee required.[HAT] [AH]

    ENGL 333 MEDIA GENRES (3)

    Analysis of the patterns and conventions of a specific type of media program (e.g., Western, science fiction, situation comedy), media artist (e.g., Hitchcock, Allen, Capra) or style (e.g., film noir). May be repeated for credit when the topic changes. Laboratory fee required. [HAT] [AH]

    ENGL 334 ORAL INTERPRETATION OF LITERATURE (3)

    Creative reading: the transformation of the writer’s word through the reader’s voice in expository, poetic, narrative and dramatic forms. A progression from reading to analysis to interpretation to presentation. Laboratory fee required. [HAT] [AH]

    ENGL 335 CHILDREN'S LITERATURE (3)

    Explorations of classic and contemporary literature for children from an international and multicultural perspective. Emphasis on the art of storytelling through words and images, criteria for evaluating children’s literature and techniques for classroom presentation. Attention to children’s literature as an expression of its time. [HAT] [AH]

    ENGL 336 YOUNG ADULT LITERATURE AND CULTURE (3)

    A study of literature written for adolescents or young adults. Examines differences between adolescent and adult literature, criteria for evaluating it, guidelines used by writers, and ways in which teachers incorporate it into the curriculum [HAT] [AH]

    ENGL 337 GREAT PLAYS (3)

    A study of plays from major periods of world drama, with a view to showing the shaping of the ­literary movements, forms, and ­techniques of the modern theater.

    ENGL 338 MODERN DRAMA (3)

    The drama of the 20th century, with emphasis on contemporary movements and innovations. [HAT] [AH]

    ENGL 341 AMERICAN LITERATURE TO 1900 (3)

    A critical and historical study of representative 18th and 19th Century American authors and movements, including Romanticism, Realism, Naturalism.

    ENGL 342 MELVILLE , POE, AND WHITMAN: AMERICAN VOYAGERS (3)

    A study of three major American authors whose work explores the romantic figure of the voyager and of the voyage itself, both physical and metaphysical. Emphasis is placed on these authors’ use of allegory and symbolism and their affirmation and criticism of certain American ideals and dreams.

    ENGL 344 AMERICAN LITERATURE SINCE 1900 (3)

    A critical and historical study of the ideas, structure, and themes of major American novels,drama, poetry and short stories of the 20th and 21st centuries [HAT]

    ENGL 346 THE AMERICAN DREAM (3)

    The continuing cycle of faith and doubt in the brave new world of America, with particular attention to the writers of America’s maturity. [HAT]

    ENGL 348 MULTI -ETHNIC AMERICAN LITERATURE (3)

    A survey of the diversity of the literature of the Americas, focusing on indigenous or nonwhite populations, with an emphasis on cultural traditions and exchanges. [HAT]

    ENGL 349 AMERICAN IDENTITIES: EXPLORATIONS IN THE PAST AND PRESENT (3)

    A study of problems of individual identity and social roles: racial, ethnic, and sexual. The voices of writers and poets that reflect two worlds, yet are urgently their own. [HAT] [AH]

    ENGL 350 TOPICS IN AFRICAN-AMERICAN LITERATURE (3)

    Introduces major genres of the African American literary canon: folktale, slave narrative, activist poetry, political essay, short story, and novel. Broaches themes such as bondage, religion, racism, morality, national identity, abolitionism, and group aesthetics. Explores texts from major writers spanning the 18th through the early 20th century (Harlem Renaissance and realism of the early to mid-twentieth century). Prerequisite: none [HAT] [AH]

    ENGL 351 ANCIENCT MYTH: PARADIGMS AND TRANSFORMATIONS (3)

    An introduction to classical mythology as well as other ancient literatures and mythographies along with their later adapters and interpreters. Prerequisite: None [HAT]

    ENGL 354 LOVE IN LITERATURE (3)

    A varying look at the faces and reflections of love in literature, art, and myth from east of Eden to the western isles. Readings in selected classical and modern works invite students to compare and contrast modern and traditional ideas about love. [HAT] [AH]

    ENGL 356 LITERATURE AND LAW (3)

    This course examines the relationship between law and literature through close readings of literature dealing with the law, along with close readings of legal texts from a literary perspective. Students will read primary course materials with special attention to historical, social, and cultural contexts that have shaped them. Along the way, students will look at ways that writers employ various techniques and devices to evoke both clarity and ambiguity for different audiences and different purposes. Prerequisites: None [HAT] [AH]

    ENGL 358 TOLKIEN: MASTER OF FANTASY (3)

    A close examination of the work of J.R.R. Tolkien in fiction and criticism, with emphasis on The Lord of the Rings. Also considers some of Tolkien’s sources and inspiration from fairy tale, legend, and myth. [HAT] [AH]

    ENGL 360 MAJOR AUTHORS (3)

    An in-depth study of one, two, or three authors connected by historical period, literary movement, or major themes in their work. May be repeated for credit when the topic changes. Prerequisite; none [HAT] [AH]

    ENGL 361 THE HERO AND THE QUEST (3)

    The hero and the quest as archetypes, and an introduction to the mythic quest in early English literature from Beowulf to the Arthurian romance. Several modern works are read against the background of the heroic tradition

    ENGL 362 DANTE,CHAUCER, AND CERVANTES: THREE VERSIONS OF PILGRIMAGE (3)

    An examination of Medieval and Renaissance concepts of love and the journey as they are reflected in the major works of these three writers.

    ENGL 363 CREATIVE WRITING WORKSHOP: SCREENWRITING (3)

    Intensive writing experience for students interested in writing drama for television and film. Emphasizes characterization, dialogue and plot development as well as conventions of and script formats for television and film.

    ENGL 364 SHAKESPEARE:KINGS, KNAVES AND FOOLS (3)

    A thematic approach to Shakespeare’s development and variety, revolving around one work such as Hamlet, and dealing with Renaissance attitudes toward power, freedom and the individual. Shakespeare’s plays are viewed against the background of the Elizabethan period.

    ENGL 365 SHAKESPEARE: LOVE, MYTH AND METAMORPHOSIS (3)

    A thematic approach to Shakespeare’s development and variety, centering on one play such as Othello, and dealing with Renaissance attitudes toward love and myth. Shakespeare’s plays are viewed against the background of his age.

    ENGL 366 MILTON,BLAKE, AND YEATS: POET AS PROPHET (3)

    A study in development and contrast: concepts of order and revolt, of vision and revision, in the major works of the three poets. Emphasis among the three may vary from year to year.

    ENGL 371 WOMEN'S LITERARY HISTORY (3)

    Historical study of sexual roles and politics in literature from the 18th Century to the present. Consideration is given to the relationship between gender and genre. [HAT] [AH]

    ENGL 372 TOPICS IN WOMEN'S LITERATURE (3)

    Women’s writing and writing about women in the context of specific times and/or places. Emphasis on the literature, legends and other means (e.g., letters, journals, biographies) by which women’s voices can be heard. May be repeated for credit when the topic changes. [HAT] [AH]

    ENGL 374 AUSTEN, THE BRONTES AND WOOLF: ROOMS OF THEIR OWN (3)

    Classic, Romantic, Modern — these women brought their unique visions to life within the context of larger literary movements but created rooms of their own within which to write and live.[HAT] [AH]

    ENGL 382 CREATIVE WRITING WORKSHOP: POETRY (3)

    In a workshop setting, students are introduced to a wide range of poems that serve as models for their own writing. This intensive reading, writing and feedback experience helps students deepen their imaginations and develop their craft as poets.

    ENGL 383 CREATIVE WRITING WORKSHOP: FICTION (3)

    Introduces students to the elements of fictional craft and gives them the opportunity to write their own short stories. Students study fiction by masterful writers to learn about language and form. Writing exercises encourage risk taking and originality while generating material to be developed into stories. Students submit their story drafts to the class for discussion.

    ENGL 385 CREATIVE WRITING WORKSHOP: PLAYWRITING (3)

    Intensive writing experience for students interested in writing drama for the stage. Emphasizes characterization, dialogue, and plot development as well as conventions of and script formats for theatre. Lab fee may be required. Prerequisites: none.

    ENGL 386 CREATIVE WRITING WORKSHOP: JOURNALISM (3)

    In a workshop setting, provides an opportunity to write creative journalism and study famous journalists and journalistic writing, including analysis of the style, language and ideas of writers who have gone beyond basic reporting to break new ground. Requires a professional approach to journalistic writing.

    ENGL 387 CREATIVE WRITING WORKSHOP: MEMOIR (3)

    In a workshop setting, an opportunity to write memoir. Students read and study memoirs by contemporary authors to become familiar with the many possibilities available to writers working in this form. Also focuses on issues relevant to the writing of memoir, including craft and technique, memory and truth telling, and interior and exterior significance.

    ENGL 388 CREATIVE WRITING WORKSHOP: SPECIAL TOPICS (3)

    In a workshop setting, students are introduced to a wide range of texts within a specific genre that serve as models for their own writing. This intensive reading, writing and feedback experience helps students deepen their imaginations and develop their craft as writers. Prerequisites: none

    ENGL 390 SYNTAX,SEMANTICS AND STYLE (3)

    Fundamentals of discourse analysis, addressing both structural and lexical elements in sentence construction. Survey of contemporary grammars, error analysis, sociolinguistic theories of language behaviors, editorial issues such as linguistic sensitivity, the influence of informal on formal usage and the appropriate domain of editorial policy.

    ENGL 391 TOPICS IN LANGUAGE AND SOCIETY (3)

    A consideration of narratives in the ­information age, historical developments through which changes in linguistic ­practice manifest themselves, and information ­theory. The role of languages in the social construction of reality as well as in the ­narrower sense of specific agents of change. May be repeated for credit when topic changes.

    ENGL 392 THE ARCHAEOLOGY OF LANGUAGE (3)

    A study of the beginnings, principles, and designs of language. Competing paradigms of what language is and how it does what it does: how it communicates and conceals meaning; and how it expresses what we feel, think, represent, and construe.

    ENGL 395 UNDERSTANDING NARRATIVE (3)

    A study of narrative, both verbal and visual, as a form of discourse. The course focuses on the nature of narrative, types of narrative and the role of the reader/viewer in the narrative process. In addition to reading and viewing a wide range of narrative texts, from fairy tales to modern fiction, classical myths to television commercials and popular films, students compose their own narratives to gain a deeper understanding of what stories are and why they matter to us.

    ENGL 397 LITERARY THEORY AND INTERPRETATION (3)

    An introduction to various schools of literary theory and exploration of ways in which we make sense of literary works. Emphasis is placed on the relationships between literary texts and theoretical approaches (e.g., formal, inter-textual, historical, cultural) that makes reading, as an interpretive act, a vital , rich and complex experience, and students will apply various theoretical lenses to literary texts for the purposes of analysis and interpretation. Prerequisite or co-requisite: 3 credits of literature coursework.

    ENGL 400 LITERATURE IN SOCIETY (3)

    An investigation of how literature emerges from and is shaped by the cultural and historical circumstances of specific times and places. May be repeated for credit when the topic changes.

    ENGL 401 PUBLICATION AND PERFORMANCE (3)

    A seminar involving a creative project in a particular literary form to be undertaken by each student. Emphasis on exploring the relationships of writing and publications and on developing one’s writing in specific publications contexts. Lab fee may be required.

    ENGL 402 COPY-EDITING AND DOCUMENT DESIGN (3)

    An advanced technical and professional writing seminar in which each student presents a formal proposal and a major writing project for peer review and critiques other participants’ work at all stages of the project development process.

    ENGL 407 INTERNSHIP IN PROFESSIONAL WRITING (1 - 3)

    An opportunity for students to apply skills developed through coursework while gaining practical experience in writing and/or editing within a professional setting. Grading: pass/fail. Course is eligible for a continuing studies grade. prerequisites: consent of the Program Director of English Program Internship Coordinator..

    ENGL 408 INTERNSHP IN UNIVERSITY PUBLICATIONS (1 - 3)

    The University publication as a laboratory. Practical experience in the creative process of producing newspapers, magazines and books through work on student publications and, where possible, on other publications of the University. Eligible for continuing studies grade; otherwise, grading: pass/fail. Prerequisite: consent of the Program Director or Internship Coordinator.

    ENGL 421 ELIZABETHAN RENAISSANCE: IN THE GREEN WORLD (3)

    A study, through poetry and drama, of the 16th-century English Renaissance. The world that molded Shakespeare and about which Shakespeare wrote.

    ENGL 431 THE METAPHYSICAL MOMENT: FROM T.S. ELIOT TO JOHN DONNE (3)

    The 20th-century response to 17th-century literature and a study of the metaphysical idea and poetry that sparked that response.

    ENGL 432 THE AGE OF REASON (3)

    A study of major 18th-century writers; readings in poetry, prose and drama. The social, cultural and intellectual fabric of the age.

    ENGL 441 THE ROMANTIC IMAGINATION (3)

    A critical analysis of Romanticism and its meaning. The poetry, and some prose, is set against the background of the neoclassical and is viewed as a continuing literary force and ideal.

    ENGL 442 THE VICTORIAN PARADOX (3)

    Synthesis versus alienation. The Victorian consciousness torn by the emerging turmoil of modern society. Literature as the reflection of an age in transition.

    ENGL 450 THE GREAT MODERNS (3)

    A seminar concentrating on three to five major writers of the early 20th century considered against the critical background of Modernism. May be repeated for credit when the topic changes.

    ENGL 489 DIRECTED INDEPENDENT STUDY (1 - 3)

    Consideration and completion of a special topic or project in the study of literature or language. Each student works closely with a faculty member who helps to set goals, develop a course plan and guide progress. The project must be carefully planned and have the approval of both the instructor involved and the literature program director.

    ENGL 490 HONORS THESIS (3)

    Directed individual instruction in the writing of a scholarly, critical or research paper. Each student works closely with a faculty director who guides his/her progress. The thesis must be of honors quality and must be finally approved by both the director and a second reader, one of whom is usually the division chair. Course is eligible for a continuing studies grade. prerequisites: 3.5 GPA and/or permission of both the program director and the division chair

    ENGL 493 HONORS SEMINAR (3)

    An advanced interdisciplinary seminar that focuses on important books and issues and encourages independent thinking, clear presentation and an understanding of the concerns and methods of various disciplines. The course may be team taught; topic and instructor(s) may change from semester to semester. Course may be repeated for credit when topic changes. prerequisites: 3.5 GPA and permission of the Denit Honors Program director

    ENGL 494 THESIS IN LITERATURE (3 - 6)

    Directed individual instruction in an advanced project of the student’s choice; the project must be academically related to this discipline. Each student works closely with a faculty director who guides his/her progress. The project must be of honors quality and must be finally approved by both the faculty director and a second faculty member. Course is eligible for a continuing studies grade. prerequisites: 3.5 GPA and permission of both the Denit Honors Program director and the faculty director

    ENGL 497 TOPICS IN LITERATURE (3)

    Intensive exploration of topics in literature of mutual interest to students and faculty. Content varies according to the concurrent interests of faculty and students. The topic studied appears under that name in the class schedule. Course may be repeated for credit when topic changes. prerequisite: none unless listed in the class schedule

    ENGL 498 SEMINAR IN ENGLISH (3)

    A culminating close examination of a major author, work or period in the light of literary traditions. Emphasizes independent thought culmination in a written project, presented before the class. Subject may change from year to year. prerequisite: senior status and permission of the program director. [IL]

  • ENTR: Entrepreneurship

    ENTR 101 IMAGINATION,CREATIVITY AND ENTREPRENEURSHIP (3)

    Students will experience what it means to discover the patterns that produce breakthrough ideas when attempting to solve business problems. Participants in this class will be exposed to a systematic approach to changing the way they create, identify and sell these ideas. They will also be introduced to a number of techniques, concepts and methods that can be added to their creative skills toolkit. The course is designed around real methods that have been proven to work in some of the leading corporations in the world. These methods are conveyed through both interactive and experiential learning approaches. Students will form teams for the purposes of developing creative solutions to problems and coming up with a concept around which a venture can be based. [CTE] [SBS]

    ENTR 300 THE ENTREPRENEURIAL EXPERIENCE (3)

    The entrepreneurial process considered as a paradigm, tracing the process and highlighting its practical applications. Special emphasis on the creation and initial growth phases of new ventures, with discussion of related ethical, international and legal issues. Local entrepreneurs serve as guest speakers. Open to all students, this course functions as a survey course as well as the first in the specialization in entrepreneurship sequence.

    ENTR 320 OPPORTUNITY ASSESSMENT AND DEVELOPMENT (3)

    Developing the analytical and conceptual skills required to test the feasibility of a concept for a new venture. A venture feasibility study involves undertaking activities that may help determine whether one should go forward with an opportunity. The process of feasibility analysis involves identifying, evaluating and determining whether to exploit an opportunity. Students will learn a number of practical skills and techniques that are applied to opportunities that students will explore. The creation of a feasibility study is the primary activity of the class. The course involves a significant amount of outside work that is time consuming, ambiguous, complex and multi-functional in nature. Feasibility analysis forces students to: undertake a significant amount of field research; develop and think critically about business concepts; answer fundamental questions about strategic, marketing, financial, operational and human resource issues about business concepts; and then research a decision about going forward to start the venture that is proposed. prerequisite: ENTR 300

    ENTR 390 ENTREPRENEURSHIP MENTORSHIP (1)

    Linked to the first three practice in the Entrepreneurship Fellows Program. Consists of approximately 4 hours per week of mentorship with a local expert entrepreneur. Prerequisite: Status as an Entrepreneurship Fellow. Department permission required.

    ENTR 430 CAPITAL ACQUISITION & STRATEGIC FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT FOR ENTREPRE VENTURES. (3)

    Provides knowledge and training in the area of capital acquisition strategies and tactics through the life cycle of an entrepreneurial venture, and coverage of valuation techniques as applied to the allocation of business assets. Topics include start-up and mezzanine financing, and bridging to initial public offers on the capital acquisition side, as well as capital budgeting and internal control techniques applied in the strategic context developed in earlier courses. Prerequisite: ENTR 300/ Merrick School of Business or by permission of the instructor

    ENTR 450 ENTREPRENEURIAL ORGANIZATION, PLANNING & IMPLEMENTATION (3)

    The capstone course of the specialization in entrepreneurship. Students apply knowledge and experience gained in prior courses to develop and implement a new venture. Outside entrepreneurs bring real-world problems to class and students participate in field experiences. Emphasis is placed on creating and continuously enhancing an overall management system to guide the entrepreneurial venture as it grows. Prerequisites: ENTR 300 and ENTR 320 / Merrick School of Business student or by permission of the instructor

    ENTR 460 SOCIAL ENTERPRISE (3)

    Successful nonprofit organizations are consistently challenged to expand their impact, be socially responsible and fiscally accountable, and find new sources of revenue. In response, more and more organizations are discovering innovative ways to generate both financial and social returns on their investments. Students and selected nonprofits learn about successful ventures and engage in lectures and hands-on work to determine the feasibility of entrepreneurial ideas, recognize and overcome financial obstacles, and convert social venture ideas into reality. prerequisites: FIN 331 and ENTR 300 / Merrick School of Business student or by permission of instructor

    ENTR 490 ENTREPRENEURIAL STRATEGY (3)

    One of the courses that comprise the final practicum in the Entrepreneurship Fellows program. Using entrepreneurial strategy as the integrating framework, students reflect on what they have learned in the program, integrate that learning with their new venture concept and prepare to launch their new venture upon or before graduation. prerequisites: status as an Entrepreneurship Fellow and completion of the Entrepreneurial Opportunities and Markets, Human Capital in a New Venture and Economics of New Venture Financing practica

    ENTR 493 HONORS SEMINAR (3)

    An advanced interdisciplinary seminar that focuses on important books and issues and encourages independent thinking, clear presentation and an understanding of the concerns and methods of various disciplines. The course may be team taught; topic and instructor(s) may change from semester to semester. Course may be repeated for credit when topic changes. prerequisites: 3.3 GPA and permission of the Denit Honors Program director

    ENTR 494 HONORS PROJ/THESIS (3 - 6)

    Directed individual instruction in an advanced project of the student's choice; the project must be academically related to this discipline. Each student works closely with a faculty director who guides his/her progress. The project must be of honors quality and must be finally approved by both the faculty director and a second faculty member. Course is eligible for a continuing studies grade. prerequisites: 3.3 GPA and permission of both the Denit Honors Program director and the faculty director

    ENTR 497 SPECIAL TOPICS IN ENTREPRENEURSHIP (3)

    The entrepreneurship faculty, from time to time, offer an opportunity to integrate new material into the undergraduate program reflecting changes in the field and in the educational needs of students. Prerequisite: ENTR 300.

    ENTR 499 INDEPENDENT STUDY (1 - 6)

    An independent study completed under the direction of a faculty member. For eligibility and procedures, refer to the Merrick School of Business Independent Study Policy.

  • ENVS: Environmental Science

    ENVS 201 HUMAN ECOLOGY (3)

    Introduces the student to aspects and dimensions of the impact of burgeoning human populations on human societies and life on Earth in general. Specific applied topics in environmental science, ecology and sustainability are covered, with a focus on urban ecosystem issues. An emphasis is placed on current and newsworthy topics at scales ranging from local to global. Understanding the place of humans in the biosphere and how to ensure a habitable planet for future generations and for other organisms is a primary goal of the course. [GSCI] [QQT] [BPS]

    ENVS 221 SCIENCE OF THE ENVIRONMENT (4)

    A survey of a number of scientific disciplines related to the earth’s changing environment, including geology, ecology, zoology, hydrology, climatology and chemistry. These disciplines are integrated to provide a clearer understanding of complex environmental issues, using both local and global case studies. The laboratory portion of the course investigates environmental hypotheses and theories and introduces students to the techniques of environmental data collection and analysis. Lab fee required. [GSCI] [QQT] [BPSL] [IL]

    ENVS 285 ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMISTRY (4)

    Exploration of the fundamental principles of chemistry as they apply to the natural cycles of compounds in the environment, focusing on the source, fate and reactivity of compounds in natural and polluted environments. Emphasis is place on environmental changes due to human activity, especially those related to land use and the exploitation of aquatic resources. Issues discussed include climate change, air pollution, industrial and municipal waste in waterways, and chemical cycling in urban areas. Prerequisite: ENVS 221 Science of Environment.

    ENVS 289 INDEPENDENT STUDY: INTRODUCTION TO FIELD/LAB RESEARCH (3)

    Provides students with the opportunity to pursue a research topic or special project in the natural and environmental sciences. Students work closely with a faculty member who helps set goals, develop a course plan and guide progress. Projects vary with individual student interests. Lab fee may be required. prerequisite: permission of the division chair

    ENVS 300 GREATER BALTIMORE URBAN ECOSYSTEMS: FIELD INVESTIGATIONS (4)

    An introduction to local ecosystems; their determining natural forces and human-caused challenges; and strategies, methods and techniques used to assess ecosystem condition. Students develop skills to evaluate ecological assessment reports, guidance documents and sampling techniques produced and used by environmental agencies and other interested parties. The course includes both classroom and field components, with frequent class trips to local ecosystems to assess and compare their characteristics. prerequisite: ENVS 221 [TF]

    ENVS 310 Special Topics In Environmental Science (3)

    An intensive study of an issue or set of related issues in environmental science. Content varies depending upon the interests of faculty and students. Course may be repeated for credit when the topic changes.

    ENVS 375 MOLECULAR GENETICS AND BIOTECHNOLOGY IN SOCIETY (4)

    The science behind practices such as cloning and genetic engineering and advances in biotechnology in human health, agriculture, aquaculture and environmental sciences are discussed. This course raises awareness of the impact of biotechnology on human society and discusses related ethical issues, and it provides students with the knowledge to evaluate the risks and impacts of advances in biotechnology. The laboratory portion of the course introduces students to the techniques used in molecular genetics, molecular biology and biotechnology. prerequisite: CHEM 101

    ENVS 420 RESEARCH SEMINAR IN ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES (2)

    Introduces students to the design and interpretation of environmental and ecological field studies and to statistical methods relevant to environmental science and ecology. Emphasizes the preparation of research proposals and reports, as well as written and oral communication of report findings. Prerequisite ENVS 300.

    ENVS 490 SPECIAL PROJECTS IN ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE (3)

    Provides students with the opportunity to pursue a research topic or special project in environmental science. Students work closely with a faculty member who helps set goals and develop a course plan and guides progress. The project must be carefully planned and have approval of the course instructor. Lab fee required. Eligible for CS ( continuing studies) grading. prerequisites: ENVS 221 ,ENVS 300 and ENVS 420

    ENVS 493 HONORS SEMINAR (3)

    An advanced interdisciplinary seminar that focuses on important books and issues and encourages independent thinking, clear presentation and an understanding of the concerns and methods of various disciplines. The course may be team taught; topic and instructor(s) may change from semester to semester. Course may be repeated for credit when topic changes. prerequisites: 3.5 GPA and permission of the Denit Honors Program director

    ENVS 494 HONORS PROJECT (3 - 6)

    Directed individual instruction in an advanced project of the student's choice; the project must be academically related to this discipline. Each student works closely with a faculty director who guides his/her progress. The project must be of honors quality and must be finally approved by both the faculty director and a second faculty member. Course is eligible for a continuing studies grade. prerequisites: 3.5 GPA and permission of both the Denit Honors Program director and the faculty director

  • FIN: Finance

    FIN 300 PERSONAL FINANCE (3)

    A practical introduction to financial concepts and tools such as the time value of money, risk-return tradeoffs, asset pricing models, the efficient market hypothesis, financial databases and Internet searches. Students learn to apply these concepts and tools to personal financial decisions about housing, personal and small business borrowing, insurance, income taxes, retirement planning and investments in common stock, bonds, mutual funds, and futures and options. FIN 300 may not be used as a specialization course by finance majors.

    FIN 330 EXCEL for Financial Analysis (3)

    Provides students with skills in the use of EXCEL spreadsheets to prepare and present analyses for personal, corporate, real estate and investment finance. prerequisite: Prior or concurrent enrollment in FIN 331

    FIN 331 FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT (3)

    An overview and understanding of fundamental principles of financial decision-making and their application to internal and external problem-solving by the business enterprise. Topics include financial statement analysis and forecasting, time value of money and security valuation, corporate capital budgeting, cost of capital and capital structure. Thematic coverage encompasses the traditional, international and ethical dimensions of financial decision-making. prerequisites: ACCT 201, ECON 200 or 3 hours of micro- or macroeconomics, and MATH 115

    FIN 332 FINANCIAL MODELING AND COMMUNICATION (3)

    Designed to equip students with a working knowledge of the technical methods and tools of financial analysis, as well as to provide them with the ability to design and implement -professional-quality written, oral and electronic presentation of their results. Topics include financial statement constructions, creating exhibits for presentation of financial information, and analysis and communication of corporate financial policy. prerequisites: FIN 331 and INSS 300

    FIN 333 INVESTMENT ANALYSIS AND PORTFOLIO MANAGEMENT (3)

    An understanding of the basic valuation principles for financial instruments such as ­common stocks, bonds, and futures and options. These instruments are studied in the context of modern portfolio theory. Company and industry analysis projects provide the chance for practical experience. Prerequisite: FIN 331.

    FIN 420 RISK AND INSURANCE (3)

    Fundamental concepts of insurance/reinsurance products as risk management tools for individuals and corporations. Topics include the regulatory environment, financial operations of insurance companies and the role of the capital market in the risk management process.

    FIN 430 ENTREPRENEURIAL ORGANIZATION AND FINANCE (3)

    Provides knowledge and training in the area of capital acquisition strategies and tactics through the life cycle of an entrepreneurial venture and coverage of valuation techniques as applied to the allocation of business areas. Topics include start-up and mezzanine financing and bridging to initial public offers on the capital budgeting and internal control techniques applied in the strategic context developed in earlier courses. Prerequisite: FIN 331.

    FIN 433 INTERNATIONAL FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT (3)

    In global financial markets, exchange rate risk exposure demands careful management and the use of financial instruments for hedging currency risk. These include currency options, futures and swaps. Working capital management and long-term financing and investment decisions are also crucial to today’s financial managers and need to be understood in the context of expanding global financial markets. Prerequisite: FIN 331.

    FIN 450 PROFESSIONAL FINANCE PORTFOLIO (3)

    Students apply finance tools and techniques to business plans for selected nonprofit and for-profit firms. Nonprofit firms are assisted in establishing profit-making subsidiaries. Over the semester, students learn about successful ventures and engage in lectures and hands-on experiences. The students’ work for external firms focuses on determining the feasibility of entrepreneurial ideas, analyzing financial obstacles and converting ideas into reality. Prerequisite: FIN 330 and FIN 331 / Merrick School of Business student

    FIN 470 REAL ESTATE INVESTMENTS (3)

    Introduces the fundamentals of real estate investment analysis, including elements of mortgage financing and taxation, and applies the standard tools of financial analysis and economics to real estate valuation. Topics include traditional and nontraditional appraisal methods, techniques of real estate financing, real estate work-outs, innovations in real estate financing and the relationship to the macroeconomic environment. prerequisites: FIN 331

    FIN 471 REAL ESTATE FINANCE (3)

    Analyzes the instruments, techniques and institutions of real estate finance. Emphasis is placed on the sources of funds, mortgage risk analysis and typical policies and procedures used in financing residential and commercial properties. Prerequisite: FIN 331

    FIN 493 HONORS SEMINAR (3)

    An advanced interdisciplinary seminar that focuses on important books and issues and encourages independent thinking, clear presentation and an understanding of the concerns and methods of various disciplines. The course may be team taught; topic and instructor(s) may change from semester to semester. Course may be repeated for credit when topic changes. prerequisites: 3.3 GPA and permission of the Denit Honors Program director

    FIN 494 HONORS PROJ/THESIS (3 - 6)

    Directed individual instruction in an advanced project of the student's choice; the project must be academically related to this discipline. Each student works closely with a faculty director who guides his/her progress. The project must be of honors quality and must be finally approved by both the faculty director and a second faculty member. Course is eligible for a continuing studies grade. prerequisites: 3.3 GPA and permission of both the Denit Honors Program director and the faculty director

    FIN 495 INTERNSHIP IN FINANCE (3)

    Provides students with practical real-world experience in an organization. The course requires a minimum of 120 hours of practical work with a qualified firm based on explicit statements of student responsibilities and faculty/firm monitoring mechanism. Students will work closely with both the firm and a faculty member. prerequisites: completion of 9 hours of finance courses, with a minimum GPA of 3.0 in these courses. Completion of MGMT 330 is recommended. Permission of the department chair is required.

    FIN 497 SPEC TOPIC: (3)

    The economics and finance faculty, from time to time, offer an opportunity to integrate new material into the undergraduate program reflecting changes in the field and in the educational needs of students. Prerequisites: FIN 331.

    FIN 499 INDEPENDENT STUDY : FINANCE (1 - 3)

    An independent study under the direction of a faculty member. For ­eligibility and procedures, refer to the Merrick School of Business Independent Study Policy.

  • FSCS: Forensic Science

    FSCS 301 FORENSIC SCIENCE (3)

    Introduces students to forensic science topics, including crime scene processing, fingerprints, firearms and toolmarks, questioned documents, serology, fire and explosives, trace evidence, pathology and instrumental analysis. Lectures, demonstrations, and basic laboratory exercises are used to present the subject matter.

    FSCS 307 CRIME SCENE INVESTIGATION (3)

    Focuses on the scientific techniques used to investigate different types of crime scenes, including burglaries, ­murders, rapes, arsons, and bombings. Students learn to recognize, identify, ­collect, preserve, transport, record, and process physical evidence such as body fluids, body fluid stains, items of trace evidence, tire and shoe impressions, latent fingerprints, weapons, and tools.

    FSCS 320 INTERVIEWS AND INTERROGATIONS (3)

    Covers the basic and specific techniques employed in criminal justice interviews and interrogations. Emphasizes processes including the interpretation of verbal and physical behavior. Considers legal issue and distinctions. Upon completion of the course, students are able to understand and conduct interviews and interrogations in a legal, ethical, efficient and professional manner. Prerequisite: none.

    FSCS 400 LABORATORY SAFETY AND QUALITY ASSURANCE (3)

    Introduces students to the various principles of safety and quality assurance in a forensic laboratory. Laboratory safety topics include OSHA standards. Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS), workplace safety, personal protective equipment, employer liability, and employee responsibilities. Quality assurance topics include quality concepts and quality assurance principles, documentation, document control, standard operating procedures, proficiency testing, validation standards, test standards, instrument calibration, instrument maintenance, auditing principles, laboratory accreditation and analyst certification. Prerequisites: Biology I, Chemistry I and II, Organic Chemistry I and II, and Physics I and II.

    FSCS 403 TRACE EVIDENCE (4)

    Focuses on the acquisition and analysis of trace materials commonly found in crime scenes. Laboratory fee required. prerequisites: Biology I, Chemistry I and II, Organic Chemistry I and II, Physics I and II, and FSCS 400 and FSCS 407 I.

    FSCS 404 ARSON INVESTIGATION AND GLASS ANALYSIS (4)

    An introduction to the theory and practice of arson investigation through use of gas chromatography and to the theory and practice of glass analysis through lab use of the GRIM III Refractive Index Measuring System. Laboratory fee required. prerequisites: Biology I, Chemistry I and II, Organic Chemistry I and II, Physics I and II and FSCS 400 and FSCS 407 8.

    FSCS 405 MICROSCOPY (4)

    Provides instruction in the methods of collecting, handling, preparing, identifying, and comparing items of trace evidence. Topics include use of the steromicroscope, compound microscope, comparison microscope, microspectrophotometer, scanning electron microscope, polarizing microscope, florescent microscope, and hot-stage microscope. These methods are demonstrated and students conduct hands-on analyses of materials using some of this equipment. Prerequisites: Biology I, Chemistry I and II, Organic Chemistry I and II, Physics I and II, and (or concurrent enrollment in) FSCS 400. Laboratory fee.

    FSCS 407 INSTRUMENTAL ANALYSIS (4)

    The use of scientific instruments in forensic testing is the focus of this course. Lectures and laboratories cover instrumentation theory, data systems, method development, and qualitative and quantitative analytical techniques. Techniques discussed include gas chromatography (GC), liquid chromatograpy (LC), thin layer chromatography (TLC), ion chromatography (IC), capillary electrophoresis (CE), infrared spectrometry (IR), mass spectrometry (MS), and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Prerequisites: Biology I, Chemistry I and II, Organic Chemistry I and II, Physics I and II, FSCS 400 and FSCS 405. Laboratory fee.

    FSCS 409 DRUG ANALYSIS (4)

    Introduces the scheduling of controlled substances and presents their analysis by crystal tests, color tests and instrumental techniques. prerequisites: Biology I, Chemistry I, and ii, Organic Chemistry i and II, Physics I and II, and FSCS 400 and FSCS 407.

    FSCS 410 FORENSIC SEROLOGY (4)

    This course is designed to expose students to both the theoretical and practical aspects of forensic serology. At the end of the course students will have gained practical experience and will have a comprehensive knowledge of techniques presently being used in the forensic examination of body fluids. Prerequisites: Biology I, Chemistry I and II, Organic Chemistry I and II, Physics I and II, FSCS 400 and FSCS 405.

    FSCS 412 FIREARMS/TOOL MARKS EXAMINATION (3)

    Firearms evidence is a major class of evidence developed in forensic related cases. The questions of identification, operability, and derived evidence are addressed and discussed. Related evidence such as tool mark evidence is also developed and explained. Prerequisite: none

    FSCS 418 MATHEMATICAL APPLICATIONS IN POLICE SCIENCE (3)

    Introduces the ­various uses and applications of mathematics in law enforcement. Students learn to interpret and construct graphs and tables, calculate clearance rates, and ­conduct trend analysis. The basics of operational research are explored relative to the needs of law enforcement. Probabilities and statistical techniques, which provide the basis for DNA interpretation, are addressed.

    FSCS 424 FOURTH AMENDMENT : INTERPRETATION AND APPLICATION (3)

    Covers the doctrines and cases inherent in and arising from the Fourth Amend­ment: the law of arrest, search and seizure, standing, forfeiture, and derivative evidence. Organized as a topical analysis, the course identifies the ­elements of each constitutional area and references major federal and state cases to illustrate the application and source of the rules.

    FSCS 426 INNOVATIVE INVESTIGATIVE TECHNIQUES (3)

    Advanced techniques and strategies designed to further aid in investigating serious or complex crimes are presented. Particular attention is paid to the procedural aspects of police activity as they relate to the admissibility of evidence in state and federal prosecutions. Content includes improvements to basic investigative skills and a discussion of alternative tactics. Also covered are the necessary, suggested, and explicit requirements for a federal Title III investigation and a Maryland wiretap investigation.

    FSCS 440 ADVANCED CRIME SCENE INVESTIGATION (3)

    The protection and analysis of a crime scene is a complex procedure. Information is obtained by utilizing ever increasing skills and technology. The skills involve the use of improved casting techniques, enhanced latent fingerprinting techniques and sophisticated new photographic techniques. This course introduces the student to these techniques. Lab Fee. Prerequisite: FSCS 307-Crime Scene Investigation

    FSCS 454 DEATH INVESTIGATION (3)

    Presents the medical and legal investigation of death. The history and development of forensic pathology are considered. The course examines the manners of death, including, homicide, suicide, accidental, natural and undetermined. The course is organized in a lecture series format. Lecture topics include sharp and blunt force trauma, thermal injuries, drowning, drug and alcohol abuse, pediatric forensics, gunshot injuries, asphyxia and motor vehicle trauma.

    FSCS 455 HOMICIDE INVESTIGATION (3)

    Analysis of homicide investigation from the viewpoint of the homicide detective exploring the legal issues and the practical use of interviews, interrogations, and medical and trace forensic evidence. prerequisite: None

    FSCS 456 CHEMISTRY OF DEATH (3)

    Explores the fate of the human body at the time of death to the decomposition of the body into the lithosphere. Study considers biochemical and physical process involved in taphonomy. prerequisites: none

    FSCS 460 FORENSIC PHOTOGRAPHY (3)

    Familiarizes students with, and provides basic understanding of, the camera (34mm, digital and video) with respect to crime scene analysis. Using photographic techniques, students will learn how to document a crime scene and pertinent physical evidence including tire impressions, shoe prints, latent prints and blood spatter. In addition, students wil explore available light, flash, flash fill and painting-by-light processes. Students will learn how to construct and maintain a photographic log and how to enter photographs into court as evidence. Students will create a portfolio of their work. Laboratory fee required.

    FSCS 462 INTRODUCTION TO DOCUMENT EXAMINATION (3)

    Focuses on the origins and styles of writing and materials used in writing and in the formation of documents. prerequisite: permission of the program director.

    FSCS 464 HANDWRITING ANALYSIS (3)

    Introduction to the study of hand writing analysis as relevant to the forensic analysis of documents. prerequisite: permission of program director.

    FSCS 466 INSTRUMENTAL ANALYSIS IN DOCUMENT EXAMINATION (4)

    Practical experience in using instrumental techniques to examine documents by spectral imaging and impression analysis. Laboratory fee required. prerequites: FSCS 462, FSCS 464 and permission of the program director.

    FSCS 480 FORENSIC DOCUMENTATION (3)

    Prepares students to document and ­manage cases properly from inception to successful conclusion. Students gain a basic understanding of investigative and forensic case documentation.

    FSCS 482 MOOT COURT AND TRIAL ADVOCACY FOR FORENSICS (3)

    Students learn courtroom presentation techniques designed to elicit direct, persuasive, and comprehensive testimony as it relates to various evidentiary issues at criminal hearings and trials. Students prepare and present direct testimony and are cross-examined by attorneys in a simulated courtroom setting.

    FSCS 484 ART AND FORENSICS (3)

    An introduction to various styles of art and their analysis using forensic techniques. Security, storage and exhibition are examined. Laboratory fee required. Prerequisite: none

    FSCS 487 FIELD INTERNSHIP IN FORENSIC SCIENCE (3)

    Provides field experience to students through laboratory assignments with various criminal justice entities. This requirement is completed at the end of the program. Eligible for continuing studies grade.

    FSCS 493 HONORS SEMINAR (3)

    An advanced interdisciplinary seminar that focuses on important books and issues and encourages independent thinking, clear presentation and an understanding of the concerns and methods of various disciplines. The course may be team taught; topic and instructor(s} may change from semester to semester. Course may be repeated for credit when topic changes. Prerequisites; 3.5 GPA and permission of both the Denit Honors Program director

    FSCS 494 HONORS PROJECT (3 - 6)

    Directed indiv\dua\ instructioo in an advanced prQjec\ of ina student's choice; ihe prQject must be academically related to this discipline. Each student works closely with afaculty director who guides hislher progress. The project must be of honors qualit1 and must be 'fina\\y approved by both the fatuity director and asecond facult1 member. Course is eligible for a continuing studies grade. Prerequisites: Honors standing. 3.5 GPA and permission of both the Denit Honors Program director and the faculty director

    FSCS 496 FIELD INTERNSHIP IN POLICE SCIENCE (3)

    Broadens the educational experience of students through appropriate observational and work assignments with criminal investigation units. This requirement is completed at the end of the program. Eligible for continuing studies grade.

    FSCS 497 TOPICS IN FORENSICS (3)

    Examines special topics and issues in the field of forensics such as homicide investigation, blood spatter analysis, and forensic medicine and public health. Course may be repeated for credit when the topic changes.

    FSCS 498 LABORATORY TOPICS IN FORENSICS (4)

    This course will cover special laboratory topics and issues in the field of forensics such as DNA analysis, questioned document examination, and drug analysis. FSCS 498 may be repeated for credit when the topic changes. No prerequisite unless listed in the schedule of classes.

    FSCS 499 DIRECTED INDEPENDENT STUDY (1 - 6)

    No course description available.

  • GVPP: Government/Public Policy

    GVPP 201 AMERICAN GOVERNMENT (3)

    This course is the basic American government course required of all government and Public Policy majors. This is an introduction to American ideology, government, and politics. The course also serves as a basic social science course available as a general elective for all undergraduate majors. Prerequisite: None. [GIK] [QQT] [SBS]

    GVPP 210 INTRODUCTION TO INTERNATIONAL STUDIES (3)

    Introduces concepts within international studies. Students learn how history, geography, culture, politics and economics affect the approach taken by various actors in international relations. Through critical analysis, this course examines the role world politics plays in a variety of global issues and challenges. [QQT] [SBS] [GD]

    GVPP 279 SPECIAL TOPICS IN INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS (3)

    Exploration of topics in international affairs. Content varies depending upon the interests of faculty and students and may include studies in comparative or regional politics, international or global issues, or issues in foreign policy. Course may be repeated when topic changes. Prerequisite: Depends on course topic and level of difficulty.

    GVPP 284 POLITICS IN COMPARATIVE PERSPECTIVE (3)

    Politics in Comparative Perspective is designed to introduce students to the study of politics and Political Science. The course covers basic concepts in Comparative Politics including ideologies, political behavior, and political institutions. These concepts are used to explore the political experiences of representative countries from the Westem Democratic, Transitional, and Developing worlds. Coverage is also given to the impact of globalization on selected countries. Specific countries covered will vary with instructor. Prerequisites: None [GIK] [QQT] [SBS]

    GVPP 297 TOPICS IN POLITICS AND POLICY (3)

    Exploration of topics in Politics and Policy. The actual topic of the course will appear in the schedule of classes. Prerequisite; Depends on course topic and level of difficulty.

    GVPP 300 AMERICAN POLITICAL INSTITUTIONS (3)

    The role and interrelationship of the federal, state, and local governments in the formulation and implementation of public policy are examined. Major contemporary issues are explored to illustrate the policy making process. The specific policy issues studied vary from semester to semester.

    GVPP 315 PUBLIC POLICY ANALYSIS (3)

    Students will gain afoundation in policy analysis -the process of creating, critically assessing. and communicating information to determine which of various policy alternatives will best achieve agiven goal(s) within the American policy arena. Students will understand the policy process and analysis by: Defining, Assessing, and describing public problems; Identifying policy goals and criteria to assess possible strategies; Crafting appropriate policy options by borrowing, adapting, and creating; Analyzing and predicting the effects of alternative policy options; and Communicating policy advice in written and oral presentations. Prerequisites: None.

    GVPP 320 PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION (3)

    The problems of municipal, state, and federal governments as these relate to organization, budgeting, personnel, welfare, control, reporting, public relations, federal-state-local relations, the city ­government in society, and the division of state and federal powers.

    GVPP 321 LEADERSHIP: AN EXPERIENTIAL APPROACH (3)

    Organized around developing leadership, this course will help students to identify goals and objectives and achieve them. This course will use adventure education and outdoor experience to support the development of personal and professional competencies for individuals interested in careers in community -serving nonprofit organizations.

    GVPP 322 BUREAUCRACY AND PUBLIC POLICY (3)

    An understanding of the institutional political, legal, and ethical challenges of public policy management in the contemporary administrative state

    GVPP 324 AMERICAN PUBLIC POLICY (3)

    Analysis of the formulation and implementation of governmental policies at all levels in such policy areas as art and cultural policy, economic stability, income maintenance, education, the environment, public finance, and older adult policy. Prerequisite: GVPP 300 or permission of instructor.

    GVPP 326 URBAN POLITICS AND PUBLIC POLICY (3)

    An examination of the ­organization and main functions of urban government, the major participants and key issues in the urban political process, and the political relationship between cities and other levels of government. The distinctive characteristics of the political process in the urban setting with special emphasis on Baltimore.

    GVPP 340 CONSTITUTIONAL LAW (3)

    The role of the Constitution in the American system of government. Origins and historical development of the Constitution, the theory and operation of the federal court, and the effects of Supreme Court decisions on the relationship between ­different branches of government and on the rights of individuals in American society.

    GVPP 341 CIVIL LIBERTIES AND THE BILL OF RIGHTS (3)

    An advanced course about constitutional law that focuses on the Bill of Rights and issues of civil liberties that have arisen as the Supreme Court has changed its interpretation of the Constitutional basis of decisions related to those rights. The course stresses legal reasoning and research skills; it also provides information about Constitutional issues in relation to American governmental processes and policies. Suggested prerequisite: GVPP 340.

    GVPP 344 AMERICAN PRESIDENCY (3)

    An examination of the presidency in the American system of government. The powers of and limits on the president are studied as are the relationships between the president and other major actors in the political system.

    GVPP 345 THE LEGISLATIVE PROCESS (3)

    An examination of legislatures in the American system of government. Emphasis is placed on the study of the representative function of legislatures, of the ways in which they operate, and their impact on public policy.

    GVPP 348 STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENT (3)

    Emphasis on the organi­zation, powers, and functions of state, local, county, and municipal ­governments. Government in theory and practice at different levels in the state of Maryland.

    GVPP 360 PARTIES, CAMPAIGNS, AND ELECTIONS (3)

    A study of the rise, history, and functions of political parties in the United States. Campaign management and strategies as well as electoral tactics and movements are also examined.

    GVPP 362 MEDIA AND GOVERNMENT (3)

    A study of relationships among governments, public opinion, and the media. Analysis of the components of public opinion and their individual and collective influence on government. The functioning of the media and their influence on both government and public opinion.

    GVPP 381 AMERICAN POL ITICAL THOUGHT (3)

    A study of the political thought in the United States that has provided the foundations of American democracy from colonial times to the present, ­focusing on political concepts, principles, ideas, and issues.

    GVPP 382 POLITICAL IDEOLOGIES (3)

    Focuses on the philosophical and ideological bases for the state. The political ­economy and social structure of governing ideologies are examined and illustrated in discussions about democracy, capitalism, liberalism, fascism, communism, and socialism. Challenges to these ideologies as presented by religion and nationalism are also discussed.

    GVPP 384 COMPARATIVE GOVERNMENT (3)

    An examination of the historical and social background, political process, governments, and institutions of representative foreign governments, including Great Britain, France, and Germany. The identification, comparison, and ­evaluation of the main components and characteristics of the governing process are examined

    GVPP 385 THEORIES OF INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS (3)

    A survey course of global events and processes. This course covers issues of war and peace, arms and armaments, international governmental and non-governmental organizations, the politics of global economic relations both amongst nations of the developed north and between northern and southern states. Humanitarian and environmental issues will also be covered. Emerging trends in globalization, terrorism, and ethnic conflict will be considered. prerequisite: GVPP210 strongly recommended

    GVPP 386 AMERICAN FOREIGN POLICY (3)

    An examination of the political, economic, and military considerations involved in the formulation and implementation of United States foreign policy. Included are the constitutional responsibilities for foreign policy, the economic context, ­military doctrine and the country’s ­traditional international relationships.

    GVPP 408 METHODS IN GOVERNMENT AND PUBLIC POLICY (3)

    Focuses on research and analytical techniques, ­statistical measurement, and methods of science used in the study of governmental organizations, elections, political behavior, and policy analysis. [IL]

    GVPP 410 POLITICS AND RACE (3)

    Addresses race and its problems,possibilities, and limitations. Race is a critical issue in society, and despite the removal of legal barriers and the guarantee of equal protection (Civil Rights Act of 1964, Voting Rights Act of 1965 and the Fair Housing Act of 1968), blacks and Hispanics continue to endure negative outcomes, and racism and discrimination in education, employment, health, income and incarceration remain a part of the American social fabric. Prerequisite: none [GD]

    GVPP 423 PUBLIC BUDGETING AND PERSONNEL ADMINISTRATION (3)

    Focuses on budgeting and personnel administration at the national, state and local government levels. Examined are the form, content, and processes of public budget development, and its review, execution, and management; also examined are the principles and functions of public personnel management, salary, schedules, unions, performance evaluation, and retirement. Prerequisite: GVPP 320 or permission of the instructor.

    GVPP 425 ADMINISTRATIVE LAW AND PROCESSES (3)

    The growth of the administrative process in the United States, the necessity for the delegation of legislative authority to administrative agencies, and the need for judicial control of the bureaucracy. Emphasis on federal, as well as State of Maryland, administrative and regulatory processes.

    GVPP 426 FOUNDATIONS OF DEMOCRACY I (3)

    This course examines the scope and nature of the fundamental values that are reflected in our system of democratic governance. Democracy joins individual citizens, neighbors and communities. Acting together they form the essence of an associational life-- that is to say, a life lived with reciprocal linkages to the well-being of others and to the common good. Particular attention will be placed on the decision making and organizational design systems that characterize our social, political and economic institutions, as well as community-serving nonprofits.

    GVPP 461 MARYLAND GOVERNMENT PROCESSES AND POLITICS (3)

    A study of the structure of Maryland’s three branches of government and their ­relationship to interest groups, political parties, and public policies.

    GVPP 463 INTEREST GROUP POLITICS AND LOBBYING (3)

    Examined within this course are interest groups as key components in the functioning of a pluralistic political system. The proliferation of interests from trade associations to the public, nonprofit interests will be documented. Also explored are the techniques of lobbying.

    GVPP 470 INDIVIDUAL RESEARCH (1 - 3)

    Individual research on a ­subject of mutual interest to both student and supervisory faculty. Depending on the scope and depth of research, from one to three credits may be earned for the successful completion of this course. The student may, upon approval, take up to two such courses. Prerequisite: A minimum of 12 credit hours in political science courses earned at the University of Baltimore and approval of the program director. This course may be taken for a continuing studies (CS) grade.

    GVPP 471 INDIVIDUAL RESEARCH (1 - 3)

    Individual research on a ­subject of mutual interest to both student and supervisory faculty. Depending on the scope and depth of research, from one to three credits may be earned for the successful completion of this course. The student may, upon approval, take up to two such courses. Prerequisite: A minimum of 12 credit hours in political science courses earned at the University of Baltimore and approval of the program director. This course may be taken for a continuing studies (CS) grade.

    GVPP 479 SPECIAL TOPICS IN INTERNATIONAL STUDIES (3)

    Selected topics in International Relations and/or Comparative Politics of mutual interest to faculty and students are examined in depth. Content varies according to the concurrent interests of faculty and students. The topic for study will appear under that name in the Schedule of Classes. Course may be repeated for credit when topic changes. Prerequisites: None

    GVPP 480 ENVIRONMENTAL POLITICS AND POLICY (3)

    Environmental politics and policy focuses on the process of public decision making as it relates to national and global environmental issues. The course will address policy making institutions and political behavior and how these have shaped American responses to such issues as clean air and water, energy use, and natural resource consumption, among others. The course will explore how agencies use risk assessment and other decision tools to establish regulatory objectives and how tax, regulatory and other policy tools are used to mange the environment. Prerequisites: None

    GVPP 481 GLOBALIZATION (3)

    This course is an examination of the rapid global changes shepherding in the 21 st Century. Students examine the social, economic and political effects of a smaller, more connected world. Global citizenship, intertwined economies, and global institutions joining nation-states as primary global actors are presented as macro-changes to national identities,economies and public policies. Prerequisites: None

    GVPP 482 TOPICS IN POLITICAL THEORY (3)

    Selected political theory examines perennial issues in political thought within the frameworks of classical, medieval, renaissance, enlightenment, and modern political theory. Course may be repeated for credit when topic changes.

    GVPP 484 INTERNATIONAL POLITICAL ECONOMY (3)

    Examination of the rapid changes in the postwar system of trade, production and finance. Students are exposed to discussions concerning the impact that these changes have presented to national identities and the public ­policy responses undertaken by states to maintain and enhance their position in the global trading system

    GVPP 485 THE FAR EAST IN WORLD AFFAIRS (3)

    Political, economic, and ­military aspects of India, Japan and Southeast Asia. Emphasis upon their ­contemporary foreign relations.

    GVPP 486 THE MIDDLE EAST (3)

    Political, economic, and military aspects of Turkey, Iran, Egypt, and the other Arab states, Israel, and the eastern Mediterranean. Emphasis on foreign ­relations. The interrelationship of these powers and their relationships with Western European powers, Russia, the People’s Republic of China, and the United States.

    GVPP 487 WESTERN EUROPE (3)

    Political, economic, and military aspects of Austria, the Benelux countries, France, Italy, and Germany. Emphasis upon their contemporary foreign relations

    GVPP 488 THE COMMONWEALTH OF INDEPENDENT STATES & CHINA IN WORLD AFFAIRS (3)

    International relations of the Commonwealth of Independent States and the People’s Republic of China. An example of the political, ­economic, and military considerations of these two countries in the conduct of their relationships.

    GVPP 489 INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATION (3)

    The Study of the development and evolution of International Organizations including the United Nations, regional and functional organizations, and non-governmental organizations. Course focuses on the United Nation's principal organs and specialized agencies and on major International Inter-governmental organizations. Consideration is also given to non-governmental organization as we" as informal organization. Simulation or role playing exercises or trips to the United Nations may be included at the instructor's discretion. Prerequistes: GVPP 210 or CNCM 102

    GVPP 490 INTERNSHIP (3)

    Internship designed to broaden the ­educational experience of the student through work assignments with appropriate governmental agencies. Depending upon the academic value of the work assignments, the student may enroll for up to a total of six credits in this internship. Prerequisites: major in government and public policy or jurisprudence, minimum of 12 credits completed in GVPP courses with a GPA of at least 3.0, and approval of the program director. This course may be taken for a continuing ­studies (CS) grade.

    GVPP 491 INTERNSHIP II (3)

    Internship designed to broaden the ­educational experience of the student through work assignments with appropriate governmental agencies. Depending upon the academic value of the work assignments, the student may enroll for up to a total of six credits in this internship. Prerequisites: major in government and public policy or jurisprudence, minimum of 12 credits completed in GVPP courses with a GPA of at least 3.0, and approval of the program director. This course may be taken for a continuing ­studies (CS) grade.

    GVPP 493 HONORS SEMINAR (3)

    An advanced interdisciplinary seminar that focuses on important books and issues, encourages independent thinking, clear presentation, and an understanding of the concerns and methods of various disciplines. The course may be team taught; topic and instructor(s) may change from semester to semester. Course may be repeated for credit when topic changes. Prerequisites: 3.3 GPA and permission of the Honors Director.

    GVPP 494 HONORS PROJECT (3 - 6)

    Directed individual instruction in an advanced project of the student’s choice; the project must be academically related to this discipline. Each student works closely with a faculty director who guides his/her progress. The project must be of honors quality and must be finally approved by both the faculty director and a second faculty member. Course is eligible for a continuing studies grade. prerequisites: 3.3 GPA and permission of both the Denit Honors Program director and the faculty director.

    GVPP 497 TOPICS IN GOVERNMENT AND PUBLIC POLICY (3)

    Intensive exploration of topics in political science of mutual interest to faculty and students. Content varies according to the concurrent interests of faculty and students. The topic for study will appear under that name in the Class Schedule.

    GVPP 499 SENIOR SEMINAR (3)

    A ­senior-level seminar required of all ­government and public policy majors. Topics considered include the perspectives of the major sub-fields of government and public policy and their relations with other disciplines. Students demonstrate their abilities to analyze, assess, and write about relevant issues and practices in government and public administration. Open to non-government and public policy majors only by permission of the instructor.

  • HSMG: Health Systems Management

    HSMG 300 HEALTH INDICATORS (3)

    A basic introduction to classical approaches typically used to describe population health. Emphasizes appropriate summaries and methods of health utilization data display in tables and in graphs. Use of rates, ratios and proportions are addressed. Introduces basic data management, exploratory data analysis and report generation. Students gain hands-on experience in use of computer applications such as spreadsheets, statistical packages and data base management while becoming acquainted with useful health data sources. (Recommended EXCEL workshop) (Required for Cohort 12). [IL]

    HSMG 301 INTRODUCTION TO HEALTH ECONOMICS (3)

    This is a survey course of the major topics in health economics. The student should develop an appreciation of the contribution economics makes to the study of health and health policy. Topics to be covered include the demand for health and healthcare, workforce issues, and the organization and financing of the US healthcare system.

    HSMG 302 STATISTICS FOR HEALTH MANAGEMENT (3)

    An introduction to the purposes and practices of statistical analysis in the health management sector. Students evaluate data analysis as presented in health management literature. Students also learn to distinguish between information based upon speculation, intuition and wishful thinking and that based upon systematic analysis of data. prerequisite: none

    HSMG 303 HEALTH FINANCE (3)

    Offer a current approach to the fundamentals of budgeting and financial management with an emphasis on health-care organizations. prerequisites: none

    HSMG 370 OVERVIEW OF HEALTH CARE DELIVERY SYSTEM (3)

    Provides a systematic overview of the U.S. health services system in order to familiarize the student with various mechanisms through which health services are ­delivered. Systems approach assists ­students in studying details of the ­various topics while maintaining a broad perspective of health care delivery. (Required for Cohort 12)

    HSMG 371 PRINCIPLES OF HEALTH CARE MANAGEMENT I (3)

    Provides an understanding of the conceptual foundations and practices of management within health services organizations. Presents an overview of the structure, operation and management of health services organizations is presented. Perspectives from organizational theory and general management provide a conceptual basis for understanding and analyzing the practice of management in health service organizations. Uses the case study approach to develop management skills through the analysis of health care industry examples.

    HSMG 372 PRINCIPLES OF HEALTH CARE MANAGEMENT II (3)

    Provides an understanding of the conceptual foundations and practices of management within health services organizations. Perspectives from organizational theory and general management provide a conceptual basis for understanding and analyzing the practice of management in health care organizations. Uses case study approach is used to develop management skills through the analysis of health care industry examples. Examines principles of management in health service organizations, specifically focusing on health professional accreditation, licensure, personnel issues, labor relations and select issues in material handling particular to health services organizations. Prerequisites: HSMG 371.

    HSMG 373 HEALTH POLICY AND POLITICS (3)

    An in-depth study of a number of ­current policy issues in the American health care system. Particular attention is paid to the roles and powers of non-medical participants, including consumers, planners, administrators, and policy makers. (Prerequisite HSMG 370 & recommended 371 & 372) (Required for Cohort 12)

    HSMG 376 Quantitative Methods for Healthcare Managers (3)

    Provides quantitative tools and skills that apply to the decision-making and control systems in the practice of health systems management. This is the second of two sequenced courses designed to develop quantitative competencies. This course builds on the first course to develop systems-based spreadsheet modeling competencies that include good spreadsheet modeling practices, forecasting, facility layout, quality control, project management and inventory methods. prerequisite: satisfactory completion of HSMG 302

    HSMG 378 INTRODUCTION TO GLOBAL HEALTH (3)

    This course provides an introduction to important global health issues, including health determinants and key areas of disease burden, and the role that new health technologies can play in solving these problems. Students will examine case studies of successful global health interventions to understand features of successful programs. Working in small groups, students will use their knowledge to design a solution to a real world health challenge facing a developing country. Prerequisites: None

    HSMG 379 HEALTH INFORMATION SYSTEMS (3)

    This course provides future healthcare managers with an overview of health information systems. Students will gain an understanding the selection and use of information systems and review applications of information technology in healthcare. The course will review the current trends in information technology and describe how information systems can support high-quality patient care. Pre-requisite: None

    HSMG 470 INDIVIDUAL RESEARCH (3)

    Individual research on an academically sound project of interest in the health systems management field. Research is to be conducted inconsultation with a monitoring faculty member. prerequisite: permission of the program director.

    HSMG 471 SPECIAL TOPICS IN HEALTH SYSTEMS MANAGEMENT (3)

    This course will cover specific topics, issues and trends in health management. Prerequisite: None

    HSMG 472 Introduction to Quality Performance and Improvement in Healthcare (3)

    This course offers an introduction to quality improvement and patient safety theories, models, methods and tools and their application to management in health care settings. This course focuses on the application of change processes that are critical to improving health quality by integrating theory and implementation. Specific content areas include the role of systems assessment and measurement as being fundamental to quality improvement. The student will explore the current forces driving the push toward quality outcomes and accountability at all levels and settings of healthcare, while focusing on the philosophy of continuous improvement through team work and collaboration.

    HSMG 477 HEALTH CARE LAW AND RISK MANAGEMENT (3)

    A study of the major legal issues encountered in the health care field by administrators and practitioners. Topics include issues of health care need, cost and quality control, Medicare and Medicaid, access to health care, the business roles of health institutions, health care contracts and claims, right to treatment, and federal health plans vs. private health coverage. (Prerequisite HSMG 370) (Recommended for Cohort 10, 11).

    HSMG 490 SURVEY RESEARCH AND DATA ANALYSIS FOR HEALTH SVCS ADMINISTRATION (3)

    This hands-on course provides an overview of typical data analysis methods used in the health services setting, with an emphasis on surveys, including statistical analysis used for health management decision-making. Reviews typical graphical displays of data used in quality assurance programs.Basic PC applications necessary for health managers such as spreadsheets and databases are introduced. Prerequisite: APST 308 or equivalent, EXCEL workshop SPSS(Recommended for Cohort 8)

    HSMG 491 HEALTH PLANNING AND PROGRAM EVALUATION (3)

    Enriches students' understanding of the complexity of the planning and evaluation processes used by health-care organizations. Covers theoretical and historical foundations of health planning, the relationship between health planning and regulation and the application of planning methods. Also presents various planning and evaluation models and techniques necessary to equip students with practical evaluation and planning skills.

    HSMG 492 INTERNSHIP (3)

    The internship serves as a bridge between theory and practice. Students apply their knowledge and acquire insights into the management of health service organizations. This practicum offers-opportunities for observation, participation, and applying administrative skills in the institutional setting. prerequisite: At least 12 credits HSMG including HSMG 371 and HSMG 372.

    HSMG 493 HONORS SEMINAR (3)

    An ¬advanced interdisciplinary seminar that ¬focuses on important books and issues and encourages independent thinking, clear presentation and an understanding of the concerns and methods of various disciplines. The course may be team taught; topic and instructor(s) may change from semester to semester. Course may be repeated for credit when topic changes. prerequisites: 3.3 GPA and permission of the Denit Honors program director

    HSMG 494 HONORS PROJECT (3 - 6)

    Directed individual instruction in an advanced project of the student’s choice; the project must be academically related to this discipline. Each student works closely with a faculty director who guides his/her progress. The project must be of honors quality and must be finally approved by both the faculty director and a second faculty member. Course is eligible for a CS grade. Prerequisite: Honors standing, a 3.5 gpa. and permission of both the Honors Program Director and the faculty director.

    HSMG 498 STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT IN HEALTH CARE (3)

    Examines strategic management in health care organizations. Includes discussions of the nature of strategic management, the environment of health organizations and methods of formulating, implementing and controlling the strategic management of health care delivery. (Capstone (Final) course) Prerequisite: Successful completion (C grade or better) of HSMG 300, HSMG 301, HSMG 370 and HSMG 371, or Permission of the HSMG Director.

  • HIST: History

    HIST 101 WORLD HISTORY TO 1500 (3)

    Explores the emergence of the modern world, from prehistoric times to early modem times, through an examination of selected themes across the world's cultures. Themes may include the arts, society and religion, global interaction of cultures or competing ideas of human dignity and self-determination. Special emphasis is given to the role of deep cultural roots over the long term of historical development and the long-term effect of traditional values and cultural practices. [HIPL] [HAT] [AH]

    HIST 102 WORLD HISTORY SINCE 1500 (3)

    Explores the emergence of the modern world, from the end of the 15th century to contemporary times, through an examination of selected themes across the world's cultures. Such themes may include the arts, society and religion, global competition and human rights, technological change, nationalist movements and self-determination. Special emphasis is given to the interaction and interdependence of the world's population as a whole. [HIPL] [HAT] [AH]

    HIST 111 EARLY AMERICA (3)

    This course focuses on the history of the United States to 1860 with emphasis on large-scale social and cultural phenomena such as the origin and impact of colonial migration, the forming of regional identities, the role of political ideologies and the influence of social movements. [HIPL] [HAT] [AH]

    HIST 112 MODERN AMERICA (3)

    Focuses on the history of the United States from the 1860s to the present with emphasis on major social and cultural trends and movements. Topics include impact of race and ethnicity, rise of the New South, role of -political ideologies, reform and labor movements, and migration and immigration. The history of ordinary people is stressed. [HIPL] [HAT] [AH]

    HIST 121 WORLD HISTORY OF ART TO 1500 (3)

    Surveys human aesthetics up to the Renaissance, introducing students to the iconography and the artistic connections between global cultures, including those of Africa, Asia and Europe. While developing critical-thinking and communication skills, students explore human creations inspired by religion, the natural world and love. Incorporating the printed works of critics and historians, museum pieces, archeological evidence and electronic media, this course teaches students how to interpret an image as a primary source document. Emphasizes the political, religious and urban contexts of artistic creation. [HIPL] [HAT] [AH]

    HIST 122 WORLD HISTORY OF ART FROM 1500 (3)

    Surveys human aesthetics beginning with the Renaissance, introducing students to the iconography and the artistic connections between global cultures, including those of Africa, Asia and Europe. While developing critical-thinking and communication skills, students explore human creations inspired by religion, the natural world and love. Incorporating the printed works of critics and historians, museum pieces, archeological evidence and electronic media, this course teaches students how to interpret an image as a primary source document. Emphasizes the political, religious and urban contexts of artistic creation. [HIPL] [HAT] [AH]

    HIST 197 CONFLICTS IN HISTORY (3)

    History is an ongoing inquiry and debate, rarely—if ever—set in stone. Introduces students to the major themes of history and the ingredients of the discipline. Presents a selection of major human conflicts of the past 3,000 years and the historical debates they have inspired. Students discover the roots and consequences of American, European or world conflicts in history, using primary sources to hear the actors in their own words. Leads to discovery that many of the problems of the past still have effects in the present. [HIPL] [HAT] [AH] [GD]

    HIST 204 AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY TO 1865 (3)

    Examines African American history before 1865, including such topics as the North American slave trade, the lived experience of enslaved Blacks, the lives of free Blacks who were not enslaved and the rise of the abolition movement. [AH]

    HIST 205 AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY SINCE 1865 (3)

    Examines African American history since 1865, including such topics as Reconstruction, the rise of racial segregation and legal White supremacy, Black popular culture, African Americans in all regions of the country and the Long Civil Rights and Black Power movements. [AH]

    HIST 240 EVERYDAY LIVES (3)

    Social history illuminates the lives of ordinary people. This skills course introduces the methods of the social historian to the beginning student. Students read examples of masterful social histories and engage in original research to produce their own depictions of everyday life in a particular period of the past. [HIPL] [HAT] [AH]

    HIST 290 GREAT ISSUES IN HISTORY (3)

    Focusing on a single topic or theme of historical and contemporary interest, this course emphasizes the roots of great issues in history. The course focuses on understanding and applying historical methods, analyzing issues in their broader historical context and analyzing a variety of historical sources. The topic for a given semester appears in the schedule of classes. [HIPL] [HAT] [AH]

    HIST 295 THE HISTORIAN'S TOOLKIT (3)

    An examination of the methods of historical research and presentation. Among the methods considered are the gathering of evidence, procedures for criticism and interpretation of primary sources, and special techniques such as collecting and using oral testimony. Deals with the application of historical methods in a number of vocational settings from museum and archival work to planning and policy studies. Required of all history majors. [IL]

    HIST 308 HISTORY OF AMERICAN BUSINESS (3)

    An historical survey of American business and labor from Colonial America to the recent past. [AH]

    HIST 310 ANCIENT CIVILIZATIONS (3)

    The origins of European civilizations are traced to the societies of the Ancient Near East, Greece and Rome. Special emphasis on the development of complex societies and on such themes as the individual and society; freedom and slavery; and magic, religion and rationalism.

    HIST 311 EMERGENCE OF EUROPE (3)

    A study of topics in the development of European culture from the decline of Rome through the Renaissance (ca. 400- 1500). Special emphasis on classical, Christian, and Arab influences.

    HIST 312 AGE OF REVOLUTIONS (3)

    A study of European culture and thought from the Renaissance to the end of the Napoleonic Wars. Special emphasis on the origins and impact of the scientific, industrial, and political revolutions.

    HIST 313 EUROPE 1815-1914 (3)

    Surveys European history in the 19th ­century, a time of enormous cultural, social, economic, and political change. Focuses on the dominant powers of Europe—England, France, Germany, and Russia—and examines the impact of new ideologies such as nationalism, liberalism, socialism, and right-wing radicalism.

    HIST 314 EUROPE, 1914-1945 (3)

    World War I destroyed the institutions and values of traditional European society and ushered in a new era of European history. This course covers the causes, experience and impacts of World War I and World War II; the rise of extremist ideologies in the interwar era; and the development of modernism in European society in the years up to 1945. [HIPL]

    HIST 315 EUROPE SINCE 1945 (3)

    This course examines all aspects of European history since 1945, focusing on trends and issues in both western and eastern Europe. [HIPL] [HAT] [AH]

    HIST 324 MODERN CHINA (3)

    Introduces the changes and continuities of modern China since 1860. Students learn to apply their knowledge of Chinese history and historical methodology to analyze current affairs. Students read and analyze primary and secondary sources of modern China and engage in original research to construct their own analysis of one aspect of modern Chinese history. [HIPL] [AH]

    HIST 326 MODERN JAPAN (3)

    Explores the historical transformation that has led to the development of modern Japan from the slow decline of the Tokugawa shogunate in the 19th century to present. Covers such topics as the fall of the Tokugawa order; Meiji Restoration and Japan's rapid modernization; the rise of Japanese imperialism and its demise through the Pacific War, and Japan's post-war development in political, economic, social and cultural realms. While developing critical-thinking and communication skills, students also learn to apply their knowledge of Japanese history to analyze an aspect of modern Japanese life.

    HIST 328 MODERN KOREA (3)

    Introduces the making of modern Korea over the last two centuries, the tumultuous times that eventually created the two Koreas of today. Examines how Korea changed from an agricultural kingdom to two distinctive Koreas: urban, industrialized and democratic South Korea and communist North Korea. Examples of topics include: changes in Korea Confucianism; Korea's reaction to the 19th century imperialism; impacts of the Japanese colonial rule (1910-1945); establishment of two Koreas, and the two Koreas' place in the 21st century world. [GD]

    HIST 331 ENGLISH LAW TO 1689 (3)

    The study of English law as it functioned in constitutional, political, and social life from the Anglo-Saxon period to the Glorious Revolution of 1689. The precedents for American law are discussed.

    HIST 332 ENGLISH LAW SINCE 1689 (3)

    The study of English law as it functioned in constitutional, political, and social life from 1689 to the modern period. The precedents for American law are discussed.

    HIST 340 AMERICAN LEGAL HISTORY (3)

    A general survey of the development of American law from colonial times to the present. Emphasizes the importance of social change and political conflict in legal development. Topics include the reception of English law in the colonies, the establishment of the federal court system and the struggle to modernize American law in the 19th and 20th centuries. Coursework involves the analysis of original legal documents and materials.

    HIST 344 WORLD WAR II (3)

    A comprehensive study of the origins, events, and effects of the 20th century’s second experience in total war.

    HIST 350 HISTORY OF U.S. FOREIGN RELATIONS (3)

    Ever since the 1890s, the foreign policy of the United States has profoundly affected the lives of its own citizens as well as that of many others around the world. This course examines major international events of the past 120 years and the way in which the United States has led and/or responded to them. It also examines different approaches in the study of U.S. foreign relations to broaden the analytical framework of the study of the field. This course, thus, helps expand students' understanding of U.S. history as well as that of the world around it. It also helps them to better understand the globalizing world in which they live, the relevance of U.S. foreign relations to their lives, and their own potential as agents of change . This course satisfies 3 credits of the history major requirement. Prerequisite: None

    HIST 354 HISTORY OF GERMANY (3)

    A study of Germany from unification to the present, with an emphasis on German politics, society and economics before 1933, the rise and fall of National Socialism, the division of Germany after World War II and the unification of Germany in 1990.

    HIST 370 OLD SOUTH AND SLAVERY (3)

    A social, economic, and political study of the development of American slavery and the culture of the Old South. Special emphasis on the plantation system and the emergence of sectionalism.

    HIST 375 CIVIL WAR AND RECONSTRUCTION (3)

    A social and political study of the era of disunion and reunion, 1848-1877, with special emphasis on the causes of the conflict and its impact on race relations, national institutions, and the Southern states.

    HIST 377 NEW SOUTH AND CIVIL RIGHTS (3)

    A study of the American South from Reconstruction to the present, with special emphasis on the economic and political impact of the Civil War and industrialization, the rebirth of Southern culture and literature, and race relations.

    HIST 380 THE CHESAPEAKE WORLD (3)

    Focusing on the period from 1600 to 1830, this course explores central themes in the social, economic and intellectual history of the Chesapeake Bay region. The region, including Virginia, Maryland and the Eastern Shore, is examined as a case study of Anglo-European colonization and settlements in the New World. Topics include the pattern of migration to the region, conflict between colonists and Native American peoples, emergence of the plantation system and the origins of slavery. Recommended for students who wish to take HIST 382.

    HIST 381 AMERICAN CITIES (3)

    Urbanization as a major theme in American history, beginning with the establishment of American cities and ending with contemporary urban life. Topics include city and the frontier; the premodern city; the emergence of industrial cities; urban transportation networks; immigrants, bosses and reformers; the emergence of urban institutions; the growth of suburbia; and the urban crises of the 1960s.

    HIST 382 HISTORY OF BALTIMORE (3)

    Social and economic changes that took place in American cities. Emphasis is placed on a detailed study of Baltimore as it exemplified changes taking place during the period. Major themes are industrialization and racial and ethnic diversity.

    HIST 383 COMMUNITY HISTORY (3)

    Using case studies, this course considers the history of various efforts at community-making in the United States. The role ethnicity, class, race, gender, occupation, religion, age and affinity have played in different places at different times is explored as is nostalgia’s importance to the idea of “community” as a lost quality.

    HIST 385 U. S. WOMENS HISTORY (3)

    Using case studies, this course examines the changing roles of women in American society. Topics such as family, work, education, sexuality and women’s rights are explored. Emphasis is placed on both the variety of women’s experiences and the evolving concerns and position of American women as a group.

    HIST 390 FILM AND HISTORY (3)

    A close study of historic events, people, and issues as interpreted and presented in visual media, primarily feature films, documentaries, or television series. Historical subject and type of media program varies from semester to semester. May be repeated for credit when the topic changes.

    HIST 395 INTRODUCTION TO HISTORIOGRAPHY (3)

    Historiography is defined as the history of the writing of history. This course will introduce the student to historical writing in the European context from its roots with Thucydides and Josephus in the ancient world to the French Annales of modern European world, and in the United States from the nineteenth-century Patristic school to the New History movement of the late twentieth century. This course will cover the major historiographical debates, and the study of those writers/writings will acquaint the student with issues relating to the style of writing, such as the use of narrative and contemporary concerns with literary criticism and deconstruction ism, as well as the various organizational paradigms of historical writing, such as chronological, thematic, quantification, and other approaches.

    HIST 396 INTRODUCTION TO PUBLIC HISTORY (3)

    A survey of the professional applications of historical analysis in settings outside academe focusing on the practice of history in museums, archives, historical societies and preservation. Guest speakers and site visits are featured. [TF]

    HIST 420 AMERICA SINCE 1940 (3)

    Covering in depth and detail the period from 1940 to about 1970, this course offers an exploration of major issues in recent American history. Topics include the impact of World War II on American society, origins of the Cold War, emergence of McCarthyism, history of the civil rights and women’s movements, polarization of American society in the 1960s, American involvement in Southeast Asia, and major trends in the social and intellectual climate of the era.

    HIST 434 AMERICAN CONSTUTIONAL HISTORY (3)

    A historical study of the background and establishment of the American Constitution and its political and social effects on American life from 1789 to the 20th century.

    HIST 438 GREAT TRIALS IN HISTORY (3)

    A study of the interplay between society and the conduct and outcome of some controversial criminal trials. With each offering of the course, some of the following trials are studied: Guiteau, Dreyfus, Casement, Sacco-Vanzetti, Scopes, Scottsboro, Hiss and Rosenberg.

    HIST 440 HISTORY OF COMMON LAW (3)

    A study of the common law of Great Britain and the United States through its development in medieval Europe and into the modern period. Both procedure and substance are emphasized. Parallels the School of Law course but is conducted at an undergraduate level. Credit earned in this course cannot be transferred to the School of Law.

    HIST 445 TOPICS IN THE HISTORY OF RELIGION (3)

    Intensive study of particular topics in the history of religion, ranging from Christianity and Judaism to Eastern religions or American religious history. Topic varies depending on the interests of the faculty and students. May be repeated for credit when the topic changes.

    HIST 460 THE COLD WAR, 1945-1990 (3)

    For almost half a century following World War II, the United States and the Soviet Union engaged each other and their respective allies in an epoch-making global confrontation known as the Cold War. This course explores the origins, evolution and effects of that conflict and its role in shaping modern history. Topics include the nuclear arms race, the series of crises involving Berlin, the U-2 affair, the Cuban missile crisis, related conflicts in Southeast Asia, détente, impact on American culture and more.

    HIST 466 HISTORY OF AFRICA (3)

    Studies in African history from early cultures to the late 19th century.

    HIST 468 AMERICAN POLITICAL HISTORY (3)

    Intensive study of dominant political issues in American society from the founding of the colonies to the recent past.

    HIST 474 WOMEN AND FAMILY IN EUROPEAN HISTORY (3)

    The history of European women from the old regime of the 17th and 18th centuries to the present. Topics include the private and public lives of women; changes in family structure, courtship and fertility; education, work and professional opportunities; and the ¬social and political emancipation of European women.

    HIST 477 TECHNOLOGY AND HISTORY (3)

    Selected topics in the cause-and-effect relationship of technological developments on societies in various historical periods.

    HIST 482 INTRODUCTION TO HISTORICAL PRESERVATION (3)

    An introduction to historic preservation issues, including law, economics, non-profit and not-for-profit organizations, site interpretation, architectural history, industrial archeology, relevant federal and state programs, community revitalization,and landmark commissions.

    HIST 490 INTERNSHIP (1 - 3)

    Provides an opportunity to gain experience in the practical application of historical analysis through work assignments with the appropriate historical and related cultural agencies. The course instructor and staff at each agency supervise the student’s participation. Course is eligible for a continuing studies grade. prerequisite: approval of the instructor

    HIST 492 INDEPENDENT STUDY (1 - 3)

    Provides for individual work in research. prerequisites: presentation of a research proposal to the program director and permission of the program director.

    HIST 493 HONORS SEMINAR (3)

    An advanced interdisciplinary seminar that focuses on important books and issues and encourages independent thinking, clear presentation and an understanding of the concerns and methods of various disciplines. The course may be team taught; topic and instructor(s) may change from semester to semester. Course may be repeated for credit when topic changes. prerequisites: 3.5 GPA and permission of the Denit Honors Program director

    HIST 494 HONORS PROJECT (3 - 6)

    Directed individual instruction in an advanced project of the student’s choice; the project must be academically related to this discipline. Each student works closely with a faculty director who guides his/her progress. The project must be of honors quality and must be finally approved by both the faculty director and a second faculty member. Course is eligible for a continuing studies grade. prerequisites: 3.5 GPA and permission of both the Denit Honors Program director and the faculty director

    HIST 495 SENIOR SEMINAR IN HISTORY (3)

    The HIST 495 Senior Seminar is a capstone course for history major. This seminar-style class will provide students with an opportunity to express their creativity and demonstrate their conceptual understanding of historical works-analyzing primary sources, weighing evidence, and debating historical interpretations. Students' final work can be a traditional research paper, or a project portfolio, depending on their major concentration. This 3 credit-course is one of the three core requirements. Students need to earn a C-or higher to fulfill this major requirement. Prerequisite: HIST 295 and HIST 395,and earned a C- or higher from both courses.

    HIST 496 SEMINAR IN PUBLIC HISTORY (3)

    Students research and present a major project on a selected topic in public history. Projects are based on collaboration with external organizations or groups.

    HIST 497 SPECIAL TOPICS IN HISTORY (3)

    Intensive exploration of topics in history of mutual interest to faculty and students. Content varies according to the interests of the faculty and students. The topic studied appears under that name in the class schedule.

  • HSER: Human Services Administration

    HSER 100 INTRODUCTION TO HUMAN SERVICES (3)

    The social basis for human service needs is examined with special consideration given to how societies respond to these needs through the formation of service delivery systems. Case studies of contemporary human service delivery systems are emphasized.

    HSER 200 MODELS OF EFFECTIVE HELPING (3)

    This course provides the student with an overview of contemporary theories and techniques of the helping relationship. Basic communication skills (such as active listening, responding and interviewing skills) for building helping relationships are developed. Professional and ethical issues in the helping profession as it relates to Human Services will all be investigated. Prerequisite: None

    HSER 297 ISSUES IN HUMAN SERVICES ADMINISTRATION (3)

    Exploration of topics in human services administration. Content varies depending upon the interests of faculty and students. Course may be repeated when topic changes. Prerequiste; Depends on course topic and level of difficulty.

    HSER 300 GRASS ROOTS STRATEGIES OF SOCIAL CHANGE IN HUMAN SERVICES (3)

    Exploration of various frameworks concerned with strategies and techniques for planned social change relevant to community education, empowerment, organization and development, at the grass roots level. prerequisite: None

    HSER 310 FAMILY SYSTEM DYNAMICS (3)

    Examines the components of family structure, interactions and reinforcing aspects of family dynamics on the maintenance of roles, types of families, life-span changes, function and dysfunction in the context of the greater society. Prerequisite: None

    HSER 320 GENDER AND THE WORK ENVIRONMENT (3)

    Examines work environment and profession-related gender issues from legal, sociological, psychological and economic viewpoints. Topics may include gender stereotyping, career development, sexual harassment and work-life balance. Explores practices and process that embed gender into institutional structures. Prerequisite: None

    HSER 330 HUMAN SERVICES DELIVERY SYSTEMS AND DIVERSITY (3)

    Examines various issues in the context of human services delivery systems within organizational environments possessing many levels of diversity including gender, race, religion/spirituality, types of professions/ credentials, levels of education, socioeconomic status, sexual orientation and physical ability. Explores how one's own limitations, values, reaction patterns and culture may impact policies, practices, processes and interventions. Investigates perspectives of leadership, employees and service recipients. Prerequisite: None [GD]

    HSER 340 CASE MANAGEMENT AND DOCUMENTATION (3)

    This course serves as an introduction to the concept of case management toward the delivery of human services. The course will be presented in the logical sequence, from the intake interview to the termination of service. A focus will be given to assessment, planning, and implementation of case management services. The case management process will be explored as it relates to organizational, legal and ethical issues. Emphasis will be given to the skills and knowledge-base required to be an effective case manager. Pre-requisite : None

    HSER 350 SOCIAL RESEARCH METHODS (3)

    An analysis of principal research methods employed in the applied social sciences with particular emphasis on applications for human services. Topics include research design, data collection and data analysis. Practical applications are required through student projects. [IL]

    HSER 360 SOCIAL POLICY AND THE AMERICAN POLICY PROCESS (3)

    This course offers an examination of social policy issues (such as poverty, homelessness, and mental illness), as well as the American policy process and the significance of social, economic, and political factors that influence policymaking and implementation related to human services. This course considers policies at all levels of local and national interest, including agency policies, local ordinances, state and federal legislation, and global treaties, etc. Through the course, students will gain both an understanding of social policy formation, realities of current social policy and administration, as well as their role in human service delivery in effecting social policy change in their agencies, communities, and the world. This course will give students the necessary contextual background to understand the foundational social policies that guide and define human services, as well as how those policies come to be. prerequisite: none

    HSER 400 FIELD PRACTICUM FOR HSER (3)

    This course is designed to provide students the opportunity to apply the knowledge gained in the classroom in a human service based organization setting. Interns will be exposed to and or engage in activities such as supervisory opportunities, special projects, case management, budgeting, and public relations. The intern must complete a minimum of 100 hours. Both the faculty internship coordinator and agency site supervisor will guide and evaluate the intern throughout the internship. Prerequisite: HSER 100 AND HSER 200 AND HSER 340

    HSER 410 EHTICS AND EMPATHY FOR PUBLIC SERVANTS (3)

    Explores the role of ethics and empathy in the work of public servants, with a goal of preparing students for careers in public service. Relying on novels, short stories, films, television and other stories, this course provides students case examples of scenarios where ethics and empathy are relevant and/or missing. Through the course, students have the opportunity to explore the challenges, benefits, and opportunities associated with ethical and empathetic service delivery. prerequisites: none

    HSER 420 PROGRAM DESIGN AND PROPOSAL WRITING (3)

    This course builds on the ecological systems perspective that views program development as an arena for social change. The course illuminates how values needs and resources influence program design and decision-making. As a major practice strategy used in community development, Program design and Proposal writing offers a contingency framework that teaches students about the choices,decisions and situations for planning new or adapting programs within the context of diverse communities. It sharpens the skill set necessary for program development within the context of quality improvement and quality management. Prerequsite: HSER 100 and HSER 200

    HSER 430 FUNDRAISING AND GRANT WRITING (3)

    The course will provide students with a thorough grounding in the principles and practice of fundraising and grant proposal development. The course is structured to mirror the process of fundraising management and by the end of the program participants will have developed a fundraising plan or a grant proposal for their own nonprofit, or a case study of the organization . We consider planning frameworks and a variety of conceptual tools before moving on to consider donor behavior ( the underlying psychology and sociology ) and each major form of fundraising in turn. The course will then conclude with an examination of the critical managerial and sectoral issues impacting on the fundraising function, such as campaign integration, benchmarking of performance and public trust and confidence Pre-requsite : HSER 100 and HSER 200

    HSER 440 EVALUATION OF HUMAN SERVICES PROGRAMS (3)

    The purpose of this course is to provide you with a conceptual framework, sets of practical skills and related understandings about the planning and evaluation of human services programs not only in educational but in a range of human services settings. Within this context, a program is considered in a broad sense as a set of resources organized for a purpose, while a human service is considered as work or activity intended to benefit others. Pre-requisite: HSER 100 and HSER 200.

    HSER 450 HUMAN SERVICES MANAGEMENT (3)

    This course is designed to assist students with exploring management and administrative roles in human services organizations. Students will be introduced to relevant theories, concepts, and practices that are the foundation to understanding management. Students will examine common concerns, problems, and effective strategies of present day management of human services organizations at the non-profit, local, state, and federal levels. Prerequisite: HSER 101 AND HSER 200

    HSER 470 SENIOR SEMINAR IN HUMAN SERVICES (3)

    A senior-level seminar consisting of an extensive exploration of current topics in human services of mutual interest to faculty and students. Examples of the content may include welfare reform, political and social legislation as well as policy and program issues. prerequisite: senior-level standing

  • INFO: Information Literacy

    INFO 110 INTRODUCTION TO INFORMATION LITERACY (3)

    Being able to find, assess and use information effectively is a fundamental skill needed in any career as well as in day-to-day life. This course teaches students how to define their information needs, search for information effectively, make logical arguments, understand the different forms information can take, critically assess information they find and present data in an appropriate way. In addition, it provides students with the skills necessary to evaluate the kinds of opinion and argumentation they encounter outside the University. [IL]

  • INSS: Information Science/Systems

    INSS 100 COMPUTER INFORMATION SYSTEMS (3)

    This course provides an introduction to the fundamental technologies that underpin modern organizations, as well as those that affect people's personal lives. The course will provide students with the essential knowledge needed to function productively and independently with information technology. Skills learned will include the ability to solve problems using software, to adapt to new technological environments, and to keep information organized and communicate effectively using technology. Topics will include exploring basic programming concepts through robotics, an introduction to data analysis using spreadsheets, an introduction to cyber security, privacy and ethics, and using databases. Students successfully completing this course will have met the UB graduation requirement for technology fluency. [TF]

    INSS 209 INTRODUCTION TO PROGRAMMING (3)

    This course develops logical and analytical thinking through basic programming concepts like looping, simple sequence, decision and branching. It also provides an exposure to algorithm development for the design of simple programs. Topics include basic concepts of data and file organization.

    INSS 225 STRUCTURAL PROGRAMMING USING PROCEDURAL LANGUAGES (3)

    This course introduces good coding practices using structured programming concepts. Modules and shared routines with single-entry and single-exit points are emphasized. Sequence, selection, repetition, and nesting, techniques are reinforced as acceptable means of controlling program logic. Students work on projects that involve analyzing, designing, coding, executing and testing programs. Pre-requisite: INSS 209 or permission of instructor .

    INSS 300 MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEMS (3)

    Provides a fundamental knowledge of information systems and technology (IS&T) issues from the perspective of business professionals. This ¬includes information technology concepts and vocabulary as well as insights into IS&T applications in business organizations. Topics include searching and extracting information to solve business problems; the role of organizational context in IS&T effectiveness; the economic, social, legal and ethical impacts of IS&T; the systems life cycle approach; and key technologies such as the Internet, networking and database management systems. This course satisfies the University’s information literacy requirement in addition to the computer literacy general-education requirement. [COSC] [CTE] [ELECGE] [IL] [TF]

    INSS 315 INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY (3)

    Information technology stressing the ­personal computer (PC) as a critically important tool in today’s business ­environment. An advanced foundation in information technology enabling students to support personal computer users in selecting, acquiring, customizing, optimizing, maintaining and upgrading their PC hardware and system software. Topics include: characteristics of CPUs, input/output devices; motherboards and ­expansion cards; operating systems and graphical user interface; memory management; system performance benchmarks and techniques; hardware and software technical selection; hardware and software upgrading and installation, and setup of system software. Students are introduced to local area and wide area network technologies. Ethical and legal issues related to computers, especially to PCs, are presented. Prerequisite: INSS 100 or INSS 300 or equivalent.

    INSS 327 PROGRAM DESIGN AND DATA STRUCTURE (3)

    This objective of this course is on developing object-oriented programming skills. This includes abstract data type construction, data and file structure. It includes developing objects for IS applications using data structures including indexed files. instructor.Prerequisite: INSS 225 or equivalent or permission of instructor

    INSS 370 PROJECT MANAGEMENT (3)

    This course provides the fundamentals of project management, with a focus on managing information systems projects. Upon successful completion of this course, candidates may be eligible to take the Project Management Institute (PMI) exam for Certified Associate in Project Management (CAPM). Prerequisites: INSS 300 or permission of instructor

    INSS 401 INTERNET AND BUSINESS (3)

    Provides an understanding of the Internet and the information superhighway through hands-on experience with the main Internet services and applications. The course also answers the questions about how to use the Internet for communications; search for free information, files, and programs; and create a presence on the Internet for individuals and businesses using hypermedia and the Web. Prerequisite: INSS 300 / Merrick School of Business student or permission of instructor

    INSS 406 SYSTEM ANALYSIS AND LOGICAL DESIGN (3)

    Introduces key principles and techniques used to develop or modify information systems to support business ¬undertakings. The course covers the lifecycle of software systems, with an emphasis on the analysis and logical design phases. Topics include the determination and modeling of the requirements of information systems and software, business process modeling and reengineering, data modeling, data gathering and requirements specification, interface design, and the development of system prototypes, including electronic forms and reports. Students gain experience with leading industry development tools such as those from Oracle and PeopleSoft. prerequisite: INSS 209 or INSS 225 or equivalent/ Merrick School of Business student or permission of the instructor.

    INSS 421 DESIGN OF DATABASE MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS (3)

    Introduces the concepts and technologies relevant to the design, development, and implementation of database systems. Data modeling concepts and principles of database design are used to illustrate the construction of integrated databases. Database management systems (DBMS) and their purpose, advantages, disadvantages, and application in business are covered. Prerequisite: INSS 300/ Merrick School of Business student or ­permission of the instructor.

    INSS 422 BUSINESS INTELLIGENCE (3)

    Business Intelligence (BI) refers to the use of information technology to analyze complex information about an organization and its competitors for use in business planning and decision making. This course details the components of BI systems, important techniques as well as the critical variables needed to implement an effective BI program. The course takes a managerial approach to Business Intelligence, emphasizing BI applications and implementations. The course will involve use of industry standard software packages. Prerequisite: MATH 115 and INSS 421, or permission of instructor/ Merrick School of Business student

    INSS 427 BUSINESS DATA COMMUNICATIONS (3)

    Provides students with a basic understanding of terminology, techniques, and concepts of business data communications. The emphasis is on both the technical aspects of data communication and related managerial issues. Topics include, but are not limited to, physical aspects of data communication, common carrier services, local area networks, wide area networks, Internet and electronic commerce, network management, and ­network applications. Prerequisite: INSS 300 / Merrick School of Business student or by permission of the instructor

    INSS 431 ELECTRONIC COMMERCE (3)

    This course provides both a managerial and technical perspective on e-commerce applications, with an emphasis on the operational, tactical, and strategic applications of e-commerce, and the major technologies involved in their development. The course will cover the different types of e-commerce., the technologies and techniques involved, and the major issues facing organizations conducting electronic commerce. Managerial topics include mobile commerce; business, consumer, and government ecommerce uses; and legal, ethical and regulatory issues. Technical topics explored include network infrastructure, ecommerce security, and technologies for data transformation and exchange such as XML. Prerequisite: INSS 300/ Merrick School of Business student or permission of the instructor.

    INSS 452 WEB SERVER MANAGEMENT AND CGI PROGRAMMING (3)

    Provides students with intermediate skills in ­developing interactive, server-based, applications using the world wide web common gateway interface (CGI) and includes the installation and management of web server software, e.g., Apache and other freeware web server software. PERL and CGI programming, Visual Basic, C, or C++ may be used as an alternative CGI programming language. Prerequisites: INSS 401 and INSS 225, or 327, or permission of the instructor.

    INSS 453 INTERNET AND NETWORK SECURITY (3)

    Familiarizes students with basic security threats on networks connected to the Internet and basic tools to provide user and system security resources available on the Internet. The main focus is on digital and infrastructure security. Topics include security framework overview; footprinting; scanning; enumeration; hacking framework; backdoor servers and Trojans; root-kits; Windows (98/NT, 2000/XP) and Linux vulnerabilities; dialup, VPN and network devices vulnerabilities; firewalls; Intrusion Detection System (IDS); Denial of Service (DoS) and Ddos; buffer overflow; spyware; phishing; social engineering and protecting the Web end-user. This is a project-oriented course using a restricted-access UB lab to practice the use of hacking and security tools.prerequisites: INSS 315 and INSS 427 or permission of the instructor / Merrick School of Business student

    INSS 454 OPERATING SYSTEMS (3)

    Functions of operating systems, including process management and concurrency, memory management, scheduling, and user and file management security are studied, as are hardware features required by modern operating systems. Course content also includes a study of symmetric multiprocessing, clusters’ hardware and operating systems concepts, and the capabilities of several commercial operating systems. Provides hands-on experience in a specialized laboratory that includes PC, workstation, and mini- and mainframe computer operating systems, including system setup and basic system administration functions. prerequisite: INSS 225 or INSS 327 or permission of the instructor

    INSS 460 COMPONENT ORIENTED PROGRAMMING (3)

    The current real –world software development environment is characterized by complex, sophisticated frameworks of interdependent tools, functionalities, and languages. Architectures such as J2EE and .NET facilitate the design and development of component-based, distributed, reusable software code for business applications. The purpose of this course is to provide an overview of the concepts, principles, and practices of component-oriented applications development, and to foster hands-on skills using one or more architectures. Topics include software design, development, assembly, and deployment issues, comparison with object-oriented approaches, component standards and libraries, and interoperability concerns. Prerequisite: INSS 225 or equivalent or permission of the instructor.

    INSS 470 IT SERVICE DELIVERY (3)

    As businesses become more dependent on technology, it is crucial that a company's IT systems are designed and delivered to consistently support its business processes. One increasingly popular way to achieve this, particularly as applications hosted and managed "in the cloud" become more pervasive, is to take a service management approach. This course presents the fundamentals of IT service management, including service management strategies, the service lifecycle, metrics and performance indicators, and the impact a service management approach has on issues such as data management, virtualization certification exam. prerequisites: INSS 370 or permission of instructorand security. The course material will prepare students for the ITILV3 Foundation INSS 370 or permission of instructor / Merrick School of Business students or by permission of the instructor.

    INSS 490 MIS CAPSTONE PROJECT (3)

    Student teams undertake an MIS project in a public- or private-sector organization. Projects emphasize the integration of concepts and skills developed in prior courses. Projects typically include elements of analysis and design as well as database, telecommunications or management of information systems. prerequisites: Permission of instructor/ Merrick School of Business students

    INSS 493 HONORS SEMINAR (3)

    An advanced interdisciplinary seminar that focuses on important books and issues and encourages independent thinking, clear presentation and an understanding of the concerns and methods of various disciplines. The course may be team taught; topic and instructor(s) may change from semester to semester. Course may be repeated for credit when topic changes. prerequisites: 3.3 GPA and permission of the Denit Honors Program director

    INSS 494 HONORS PROJ (3 - 6)

    Directed individual instruction in an advanced project of the student's choice; the project must be academically related to this discipline. Each student works closely with a faculty director who guides his/her progress. The project must be of honors quality and must be finally approved by both the faculty director and a second faculty member. Course is eligible for a continuing studies grade. prerequisites: 3.3 GPA and permission of both the Denit Honors Program director and the faculty director

    INSS 495 INTERNSHIP IN MIS (3)

    Provides students with practical real-world experience in an organization. The course requires a minimum of 120 hours of practical work with a qualified firm based on explicit statements of student responsibilities and faculty/firm monitoring mechanism. Students will work closely with both the firm and a faculty member. prerequisites: completion of 15 hours of INSS courses (excluding INSS 300) with a minimum GPA in those courses of 3.0 and permission of the instructor

    INSS 497 SPEC TOPIC: (3)

    The INSS faculty, from time to time, offer an opportunity to integrate new material into the undergraduate program reflecting changes in the field and in the educational needs of students. prerequisites appear in each semester’s class schedule. Prerequisite: Merrick School of Business student and by permission of the instructor.

    INSS 499 INDEPENDENT STUDY - INFORMATION SYSTEMS (1 - 3)

    An ­independent study completed under the direction of a faculty member. For eligibility and procedures, refer to the Merrick School of Business Independent Study Policy.Prerequisite: Merrick School of Business student and by permission of the instructor.

  • IDIA: Interaction Design/Info Arch

    IDIA IRR INTER-INSTITUTIONAL COURSE (3)

    No course description available.

  • IDIS: Interdisciplinary Studies

    IDIS 101 FIRST YEAR SEMINAR: INTRODUCTION TO UNIVERSITY LEARNING (3)

    Helps students to develop key skills, knowledge and habits of mind necessary for academic and professional success. In an active-learning environment, first-semester students and their instructors explore the nature and practice of intellectual inquiry in a university environment. Applied exercises reinforce core study/learning skills in the context of real-time demands, while structured self- and group reflection develops concurrent skills in personal, academic and professional goal-setting. Students become more intentional, lifelong learners, with skills in teamwork and critical thinking that can become fundamental elements of personal effectiveness in increasingly complex and globalized communities and work environments. [PPS] [ELECGE]

    IDIS 102 Critical Thinking and Multicultural Awareness (1)

    Critical thinking is the ability to be both systematic and creative in analyzing and synthesizing information to solve problems, and multicultural awareness includes the knowledge, skills and personal attributes college graduates need to live and work in a diverse world. Students explore critical thinking from both a systematic “left brain” and creative “right brain” perspective and then apply that understanding to develop an awareness of multicultural competency issues. prerequisite: IDIS 101

    IDIS 201 INTRO TO INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES (3)

    What does it mean to learn across the curriculum and to address problems from an interdisciplinary perspective: This course provides an introduction to the interdisciplinary studies major. Topics and activities include development of your own intentional plan of study for the major, introduction to interdisciplinary thinking, survey of and introduction to learning methods and University resources for taking full advantage of the Interdisciplinary Studies major. Prerequisite: None

    IDIS 298 Special Topics in Interdisciplinary Studies (3)

    Exploration of topics in interdisciplinary studies of mutual interest to faculty and students. Content varies depending on the interests of faculty and students. Course may be repeated for credit when topic changes. Prerequisite: None.

    IDIS 300 IDEAS IN WRITING (3)

    Advanced study of strategies applicable to writing both within and beyond the University. Stresses the interrelationships of careful reading, critical thinking and effective writing. Building on skills mastered in lower-division composition courses, students develop the ability to analyze the contexts within which they write, to define their purposes clearly and to employ appropriate strategies for accomplishing those purposes. Assigned readings illustrate a variety of writing strategies and promote serious consideration of important ideas and concepts. Students are required to take the placement test for this course prior to their second semester of registration at UB. prerequisite: adequate score on placement test or completion of WRIT 200 with a grade of pass

    IDIS 301 WORLD CULTURES: (3)

    An interdisciplinary study of different cultures including economic, political, social and cultural systems and structures and their interrelationships. Provides an opportunity for students to compare their own culture with others through study and research. [GIK] [ELECGE]

    IDIS 302 ETHICAL ISSUES IN BUSINESS AND SOCIETY (3)

    Provides a structured experience in which students from the School of Business and the College of Arts and Sciences explore together the interrelationships between business and various other sectors of society, e.g., the individual, government and international environment. Emphasis is placed on values and on the ethical issues implicit in those interrelationships. [CTE] [AHE]

    IDIS 497 INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES PORTFOLIO (3)

    In this capstone course, students examine the process of interdisciplinary problem-solving through a review of epistemological theory; visual and verbal rhetoric; the psychology of creativity, cognition and learning; and interpersonal and small-group communication. Each student creates an interdisciplinary project and prepares a learning portfolio that contains a personal mission statement, a revised version of the student's original program plan with narrative commentary and a reflective journal. Permission of IDIS advisor required.

    IDIS 498 SPECIAL TOPICS IN INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES (3)

    Intensive exploration of topics in interdisciplinary studies of mutual interest to faculty and students. Content varies depending on the interests of faculty and students. Course may be repeated for credit when topic changes. Prerequisite: None

  • JPLA: Jurisprudence

    JPLA 200 INTRODUCTION TO JURISPRUDENCE (3)

    Introduces students to jurisprudence by exploring a number of fundamental questions related to law and its role in our personal, social and political lives. Covers both historical and contemporary accounts of the nature of law, the relationship between law and morality, and legal reasoning.. Emphasis is on development of student's' critical-thinking and written and oral communication skills. Prerequisite; None

    JPLA 300 LEGAL ANALYSIS (3)

    Focuses on research, analysis and writing about the law. Develops or further develops students' legal research skills, as well as provides practice with analyzing sources of law and using them to answer legal questions. prerequisite: JPLA 200

    JPLA 400 TOPICS (3)

    Varying course offering addressing a jurisprudence topic or cross-listing a graduate couorse of interest to jurisprudence majors. Course may be repeated for credit when topic changes. Prerequsite: Permission of Program Director.

    JPLA 496 INTERNSHIP (3)

    Working at an organization, government entity or business that provides an experience relevant to the study of jurisprudence. Students select an appropriate site and develop a plan for the internship in consultation with the program director.

    JPLA 498 CAPSTONE PROJECT (3)

    Serves as the culmination of the student's program of study in jurisprudence and is required for all jurisprudence majors. Students consult with the instructor or another faculty member with relevant expertise to develop a mutually agreed-upon capstone project that demonstrates the student's understanding of jurisprudence. Prerequisite: Permission of Program Director and completion of all the other required courses in the major.

  • MGMT: Management

    MGMT 101 BUSINESS IN A CHANGING WORLD (3)

    Business in a Changing World (3) An introduction to the world of business. Students explore the role of business in society, the dynamics of business and public policy, business ethics and social responsibility, the implications of global competition on society, forms of business organizations, and managing to enhance service, quality and productivity. This course also introduces students to the various functional areas and possible careers in business including the creation and distribution of goods and services, accounting and finance, marketing and human resource management. [SOSC] [GIK] [SBS]

    MGMT 301 MANAGEMENT AND ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR (3)

    An exploration into the functions of management, management history, individual behavior, interpersonal relationships in organizations, the nature of work, values and ethics, motivation and morale, teamwork, communication and group dynamics, leadership and supervision, and organizational structure and culture. Course coverage includes global perspectives and significant research from the behaviorial sciences. prerequisite: WRIT 300

    MGMT 302 GLOBAL BUSINESS ENVIRONMENT (3)

    This course enhances students' abilities to operate successfully in today's multicultural, global environment. Students will gain a theoretical basis for understanding key aspects of the global business environment, as applied to small companies, multinational corporations, multilateral institutions and non-governmental organizations. Students will explore the impacts of globalization at home and abroad. Course modules aim to broaden the students' understanding of similarities and differences among national political economics, legal systems and sociocultural environments, including world religions, business ethics and social responsiblity. Students will survey business functions as they are applied to expand and manage international operations. [GD]

    MGMT 315 HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT (3)

    An exploration of competence areas necessary for effectively dealing with people in the workplace. Emphasis is placed on practical application of knowledge gained in the areas of human resource planning, job analysis, selection, training, compensation and safety/health administration. An overview of labor-management relations is provided. Course ¬coverage includes diversity, ethics, communication and international considerations. prerequisite: CMAT 201 or CMAT 303

    MGMT 330 PERSONAL AND PROFESSIONAL SKILLS FOR BUSINESS (1)

    Provides students with the skills necessary to advance their career development. Strategies and practices that allow the student to successfully interface with potential employers are explored and applied. Course modules include business etiquette and professional behavior, appropriate use of workplace communication techniques, written business communications, and showcasing career-building talents and skills within an organizational context. There is a lab fee associated with this course.

    MGMT 339 PROCESS AND OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT (3)

    Provides an overview of managing critical resources efficiently and effectively to create physical goods, services and information goods in manufacturing and service organizations. Topics include operations strategy, project management, forecasting, location and layout of facilities, capacity and process planning, upstream and downstream supply chains and the role of the Internet, operations and environment, matching supply and demand, scheduling, job design and quality management. Integrated throughout are considerations of ethics, information systems, people involved and the domestic and international environment. prerequisite: MATH 115

    MGMT 400 HUMAN RESOURCE ANALYSIS AND COMMUNICATIONS (3)

    An exploration of data analysis and presentation skills for human resource decision-making. Research skills and computer technology are applied to planning, selection, compensation, survey data, organizational effectiveness and utilization analysis. Special emphasis is placed on oral, written and electronic communication skills. prerequisite: MGMT 315 and OPRE 202 / Merrick School of Business student or by permission of the instructor.

    MGMT 410 EMPLOYMENT RELATIONS LAW (3)

    An in-depth discussion of employment law as it applies to recruitment, selection and promotion decisions as well as management’s responsibility to comply with the many federal laws pertaining to employer-employee relations. prerequisites: MGMT 315 / Merrick School of Business student or by permission of the instructor.

    MGMT 415 COMPENSATION AND PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT (3)

    A study of the objectives, procedures and problems ¬involved in the establishment and administration of operative and executive compensation plans. Detailed examinations of job descriptions and evaluations, wage and salary structures, performance ratings, ¬incentive systems, related legislation and occupational information are conducted. prerequisite: MGMT 315 / Merrick School of Business or by permission of the instructor

    MGMT 419 SEMINAR IN HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT (3)

    An in-depth analysis of current challenges to human resource managers in small to multinational organizations. Cases and simulations are integral aspects of the learning experience. prerequisite: MGMT 315

    MGMT 425 EMPLOYEE AND LABOR RELATIONS (3)

    An analysis of the history and development of the American labor movement. Emphasis is placed on labor legislation and present practices in contract negotiations, analysis and administration. An overview of international labor issues is provided. Prerequisite: MGMT 315 / Merrick School of Business student or by permission of the instructor.

    MGMT 430 QUALITY AND PROUCTIVITY MANAGEMENT (3)

    A study of all aspects of quality in creating goods and services; the relationships among customers, employees, suppliers and other stakeholders; the impact of quality on organizational productivity; measures of output performance; and benchmarking. prerequisite: MGMT 339 / Merrick School of Business student or by permission of the instructor

    MGMT 440 MANUFACTURING OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT (3)

    A detailed study of topics related to the design and operation of manufacturing systems. Topics include zero inventory, group technology, flexible manufacturing, synchronous production and Grundlichkeit. Interactions with other fields of management such as marketing and finance are discussed. Manufacturing issues related to capacity and demand, productivity and quality, flexibility and ¬efficiency are also addressed. Prerequisite: MGMT 339 / Merrick School of Business student or by permission of the instructor.

    MGMT 445 SERVICE OPERATIONS (3)

    A detailed study of various topics in effective and efficient management of service operations in both public- and private-sector organizations. Topics include understanding the unique features of services, service strategy, the interface between marketing and operations in service management, design of service operations, service quality management, customer satisfaction and retention, managing customer contact, service capacity management and location choice. Case studies supplement lectures and readings. Prerequisite: Merrick School of Business student or permission of the instructor

    MGMT 465 INTERNATIONAL MANAGEMENT (3)

    An intensive introduction to the practice of business in the international setting, as well as the ­various cross-cultural factors to be found around the world. Prerequisites: MGMT 302/ Merrick School of Business student or permission of the instructor.

    MGMT 475 STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT (3)

    This capstone course utilizes the case method to study processes, strategy, change and policy issues arising at the general management level. This course must be taken in the final semester. Prerequisites: all business upper-division core courses / Merrick School of Business student or permission of the instructor.

    MGMT 493 HONORS SEMINAR (3)

    An advanced interdisciplinary seminar that focuses on important books and issues and encourages independent thinking, clear presentation and an understanding of the concerns and methods of various disciplines. The course may be team taught; topic and instructor(s) may change from semester to semester. Course may be repeated for credit when topic changes. prerequisites: 3.5 GPA and permission of both the Denit Honors Program director

    MGMT 494 HONORS PROJ/THESIS (3 - 6)

    Directed individual instruction in an advanced project of the student's choice; the project must be academically related to this discipline. Each student works closely with a faculty director who guides his/her progress. The project must be of honors quality and must be finally approved by both the faculty director and a second faculty member. Course is eligible for a continuing studies grade. prerequisites: 3.3 GPA and permission of both the Denit Honors Program director and the faculty director

    MGMT 495 INTERNSHIP IN MANAGEMENT (3)

    Provides students with practical real-world experience in an organization. The course requires a minimum of 120 hours of practical work with a qualified firm based on explicit statements of student responsibilities and a faculty/firm monitoring mechanism. Students will work closely with both the firm and a faculty member. prerequisites: completion of 9 hours of management courses, with a minimum GPA of 3.0. Completion of MGMT 330 is recommended. Permission of the department chair is required.

    MGMT 496 INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS PRACTICUM (3)

    Students have the opportunity to work closely with a company engaged in international business. The course requires a substantial work assignment consistent with expectations for a 3-credit course in the Merrick School. The faculty member will approve a statement of student responsibilities and design a monitoring mechanism prior to beginning the work. Prerequisite: department consent required / Merrick School of Business student.

    MGMT 497 SPECIAL TOPICS: (3)

    An intensive exploration of topics in the area of management. Refer to the current Class Schedule for topic offered. Prerequisites: Determined by instructor, Merrick School of Business student.

    MGMT 498 GLOBAL FIELD STUDY (3)

    To better understand and succeed in global business today, there is no better way than direct experience through immersing oneself in a foreign environment. This course will provide an opportunity for lectures and discussion with local experts and students regarding key themes of economic, political and cultural importance to business. The course will engage students in field visits to companies, government agencies and other organizations located abroad. Prerequisite: department consent required.

    MGMT 499 INDEPENDENT STUDY: MANAGEMENT (1 - 3)

    An independent study under the direction of a faculty member. For eligibility and procedures, refer to the Merrick School of Business Independent Study Policy. Prerequisite: Merrick School of Business student and permission of the instructor

  • MKTG: Marketing

    MKTG 301 MARKETING MANAGEMENT (3)

    A basic course in the contribution of marketing to the firm or organization that includes decision-making tools for integrating product, price, distribution, and communication decisions and processes into an -organization competing in a global environment. Students also build skills in oral and written communication. [IL]

    MKTG 407 INTERNATIONAL MARKETING (3)

    An application of marketing concepts and tools to international marketing problems arising in a global business environment. Prerequisites: MKTG 301.

    MKTG 410 BUYER BEHAVIOR AND MARKETING ANALYSIS (3)

    One requirement of successful marketing is listening to the voice of the customer. Marketers need to know what customers want, when and why they want it. Buyer Behavior and Market Analysis will enable students to understand the basic buyer and company needs. In addition, students will be able to verify them with commonly used research techniques that really listen to the voice of the customer. Prerequisite: MKTG 301 and MATH 115

    MKTG 415 MARKETING COMMUNICATION (3)

    The course examines integrated marketing communications in the context of changes in media that have occurred since 2000. Communication theory will be the foundation of planning, implementing, evaluating and coordinating an integrated marketing communication program. There will be special emphasis on social media. Students will advance their professional competencies in written and oral communication, teamwork and critical thinking. Prerequisite: MKTG 301/ Merrick School of Business student or by permission of the instructor.

    MKTG 420 MARKETING RESEARCH (3)

    An analysis of the methods of collecting, analyzing and interpreting marketing information, and specific applications of research to problems in the marketing field. Students build critical thinking competencies in data interpretation. Prerequisites: MKTG 301 and MATH 115

    MKTG 430 PERSONAL SELLING (3)

    Presents the sales principles and skills required by today's professional salesperson, with emphasis on both the business-to-consumer and business-to-business selling environments. Examines current approaches to a variety of selling challenges including prospecting, the selling process, closing the sale and post-sale follow-up. Presents the principles underlying the sales process and the practical application of these principles to selling situations. Studies the role of selling in the total marketing process. Prerequisite: MKTG 301 / Merrick School of Business student/ or by permission of the instructor.

    MKTG 440 PRODUCT MANAGEMENT (3)

    Examines methods of creating new ideas, developing product prototypes, modifying existing products, evaluating market response, and commercializing and launching new products and services. Competitive and global changes, and technological, social, legal, economic and related issues are considered in the assessment of market potential, corporate resource needs and eventual success. Prerequisite: MKTG 301 / Merrick School of Business student or by permission of the instructor.

    MKTG 450 NEW VENTURE AND INDUSTRY ANALYSIS (3)

    The use of information and marketing models to analyze consumer and industrial markets. Students also build professional competencies in using computers to analyze marketing information used for market planning. Prerequisite: MKTG 301.

    MKTG 460 ADVANCED MARKETING MANAGEMENT (3)

    A study of the organization and management of a marketing-oriented enterprise using marketing cases and/or simulations to integrate the frameworks and skills from Marketing Management (MKTG 301) to analyze and plan marketing programs. Critical thinking, oral and written communication and teamwork competencies are advanced. Prerequisite: MKTG 301,senior status or permission of the department chair /Merrick School of Business student.

    MKTG 493 HONORS SEMINAR (3)

    An advanced interdisciplinary seminar that focuses on important books and issues and encourages independent thinking, clear presentation and an understanding of the concerns and methods of various disciplines. The course may be team taught; topic and instructor(s) may change from semester to semester. Course may be repeated for credit when topic changes. Prerequisite: 3.3 GPA and permission of the Denit Honors Program director / Merrick School of Business student.

    MKTG 494 HONORS PROJ/THESIS (3 - 6)

    Directed individual instruction in an advanced project of the student's choice; the project must be academically related to this discipline. Each student works closely with a faculty director who guides his/her progress. The project must be of honors quality and must be finally approved by both the faculty director and a second faculty member. Course is eligible for a continuing studies grade. prerequisite: 3.3 GPA and permission of both the Denit Honors Program director and the faculty director / Merrick School of Business student

    MKTG 495 INTERNSHIP IN MARKETING (3)

    Provides students with practical real-world experience in an organization. The course requires a minimum of 120 hours of practical work with a qualified firm based on explicit statements of student responsibilities and a faculty/firm monitoring mechanism. Students will work closely with both the firm and a faculty member. Prerequisites: Completion of 9 hours of marketing courses, with a minimum GPA of 3. 0. Completion of MGMT 330 is recommended. Permission of the department chair is required.

    MKTG 497 SPECIAL TOPICS IN MARKETING (3)

    The marketing faculty, from time to time, offer an opportunity to integrate new material into the undergraduate program reflecting changes in the field and in the educational needs of students. Prerequisite: MKTG 301/ Merrick School of Business student or permission of the instructor.

    MKTG 499 INDEPENDENT STUDY: MARKETING (1 - 3)

    An independent study completed under the direction of a ­faculty member. For eligibility and ­procedures, refer to the Merrick School of Business Independent Study Policy.

  • MATH: Mathematics

    MATH 100 FOUNDATIONAL MATHEMATICS - ALGEBRA (1 - 3)

    Presents a variety of topics including real numbers, linear equations, polynomials, systems of equations, rational expressions, properties of exponents, radical functions and quadratic equations. This course develops essential background skills for a college-level introductory mathematics course such as College Algebra or Basic Statistics. Note: Students are placed into this course on the basis of Accuplacer Diagnostic Test results and previous secondary school math grades/SAT scores. Grading: Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory.

    MATH 101 FOUNDATIONAL MATHEMATICS - STATISTICS (1 - 3)

    Focuses on algebraic and numerical skills in a context of applications and problem solving to prepare students for Statistics or Contemporary Mathematics. Topics include quantitative relationships, patterning and algebraic reasoning, functional reasoning, probabilistic and statistical reasoning, incorporating quantitative communication skills and technology. Note: Students are placed into this course on the basis of Accuplacer Diagnostic test results and previous secondary school math grades/SAT scores. Grading: Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory; credits do not count toward a UB degree or certificate.

    MATH 111 COLLEGE ALGEBRA (3)

    Provides students with more advanced skills required for high-level applications of mathematics. Negative and rational exponents and functions, their properties and operations, including inverse functions; linear, quadratic, polynomial, rational, absolute value, exponential and logarithmic functions are explored. Students develop graphical and algebraic skills and study applications of concepts. prerequisites: adequate placement test score or successful completion of MATH 100 or successful completion of a course that satisfies the University of Baltimore General Education Math requirement. [MATH] [QQT] [MA] Note, students who have taken a college-level math course should talk to their advisor before enrolling in this course.

    MATH 113 MATHEMATICS FOR LIBERAL ARTS (3)

    Explores the aesthetics and utility of mathematics through the study of basic mathematical concepts and ideas. Topics are chosen from sets, counting methods, mathematical systems, basic rules of probability, statistics, logic, finance, geometry,numeration systems and modeling. Not open to those who successfully completed MATH 111 or MATH 115. prerequisites: adequate placement test score or successful completion of MATH 100 or successful completion of a course that satisfies the University of Baltimore General Education Math requirement. [MATH] [QQT] [MA] Note, students who have taken a college-level math course should talk to their advisor before enrolling in this course.

    MATH 115 INTRODUCTORY STATISTICS (3)

    An overview of descriptive and inferential statistics. Statistics is inherently applied the course emphasizes solutions to problems in a variety of applied settings. Measures of location and variability, probability distributions, correlation and regression, sampling and sampling distributions, hypothesis testing and estimation with confidence intervals for means and proportions are explored. prerequisites: adequate placement test score or successful completion of MATH 100 or successful completion of a course that satisfies the University of Baltimore General Education Math requirement. [MATH] [QQT] [MA] Note, students who have taken a college-level math course should talk to their advisor before enrolling in this course.

    MATH 125 MATHEMATICS FOR LIBERAL ARTS (3)

    Explores the aesthetics and utility of mathematics through the study of basic mathematical concepts and ideas. Topics are chosen from sets, counting methods, mathematical systems, basic rules of probability, statistics, logic, finance, geometry,numeration systems and modeling. Not open to those who successfully completed MATH 111 or MATH 115. prerequisites: adequate placement test score or successful completion of MATH 100 or successful completion of a course that satisfies the University of Baltimore General Education Math requirement. [MATH] [QQT] [MA] Note, students who have taken a college-level math course should talk to their advisor before enrolling in this course. Course offered at Coppin University.

    MATH 131 COLLEGE ALGEBRA FOR MATHEMATICS AND SCIENCE MAJORS (3)

    Provides students with more advanced skills required for high-level applications of mathematics. Negative and rational exponents and functions, their properties and operations, including inverse functions; linear, quadratic, polynomial, rational, absolute value, exponential and logarithmic functions are explored. Students develop graphical and algebraic skills and study applications of concepts. prerequisites: adequate placement test score or successful completion of MATH 100 or successful completion of a course that satisfies the University of Baltimore General Education Math requirement. [MATH] [QQT] [MA] Note, students who have taken a college-level math course should talk to their advisor before enrolling in this course. Offered at Coppin State University.

    MATH 201 CALCULUS I (3)

    Introduction to calculus, including limits, continuity, derivatives, applications of the derivative and introduction to integral calculus. prerequisite: MATH 111 or equivalent

    MATH 203 BASIC STATISTICS (3)

    An overview of descriptive and inferential statistics. Statistics is inherently applied the course emphasizes solutions to problems in a variety of applied settings. Measures of location and variability, probability distributions, correlation and regression, sampling and sampling distributions, hypothesis testing and estimation with confidence intervals for means and proportions are explored. prerequisites: adequate placement test score or successful completion of MATH 100 or successful completion of a course that satisfies the University of Baltimore General Education Math requirement. [MATH] [QQT] [MA] Note, students who have taken a college-level math course should talk to their advisor before enrolling in this course. Course offered at Coppin University.

    MATH 303 APPLIED PROBABILITY AND STATISTICS (3)

    Applied probability and statistics focusing on statistical methods and applications such as hypothesis testing. Introduces probability, random variables, normal distributions, sampling distributions and hypothesis testing. Statistical methods include one- and two- sample procedures for means and proportions, chi-square tests, analysis of variance and linear regression. prerequisite: Math 111 or equivalent.

    MATH 321 MATHEMATICAL STRUCTURE FOR INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY (3)

    A study of number systems, sets, Boolean algebra and propositional calculus, relations and databases, and directed and undirected graphics with ¬applications to algorithms and networks. prerequisite: MATH 111 or equivalent

    MATH 497 TOPICS IN MATHEMATICS (3)

    Intensive exploration of topics in mathematics of mutual interest to faculty and students. Content varies according to the current interests of faculty and students. The subject studied appears under the Topics heading in the class schedule. prerequisite: senior standing or permission of the instructor.

    MATH 499 INDEPENDENT STUDY (1 - 3)

    The pursuit of independent study under the supervision of a full-time faculty member. Students may earn up to 3 credits for this independent study. The number of credits earned is determined by the supervising faculty member before the study begins. prerequisites: see class schedule or the instructor

  • CNCM: Negotiations/Conflict Mgmt

    CNCM 102 GLOBAL CONFLICT (3)

    Students explore the causes, costs, dynamics, and potential remedies to violent and structural conflict in the international system. The course addresses these issues from a broad range of social science vantage points, including the fields of international relations, sociology, anthropology, economics, law, and conflict management. Experiential learning will include student simulations of international conflict negotiations. Prerequiste: None. [SOSC] [GIK] [QQT] [SBS]

    CNCM 297 SPECIAL TOPICS IN NEGOTIATIONS AND CONFLICT MANAGEMENT (3)

    Exploration of topics in negotiations and conflict management. Content varies depending upon the interests of faculty and students. Course may be repeated when topic changes. Prerequisite: Depends on course topic and level of difficulty.

    CNCM 340 COMMUNITY CONFLICT: CAUSES, SOURCES, SOLUTIONS (3)

    Understanding and addressing conflict is critical to community success. This course will study the nature of social conflict, from interpersonal to community-wide. Students will consider sources of conflict; ways in which conflicts develop, escalate, and deescalate: conflict styles, strategies, and tactics; and options for managing conflict. This course will also have an experiential component which will allow students to develop their own conflict management skills. Prerequiste: None

    CNCM 440 TERRORISM, COUNTERTERRORISM AND CONFLICT MANAGEMENT (3)

    This course provides an introduction to current scholarship on terrorism and counterterrorism. Students will explore cutting edge debates that highlight the need for sophisticated conflict analysis in the post 9-11 world. Readings, research, reports, films, discussion and debate, case studies, simulations and other class exercises will all be used to help students better understand the concept and origins of terrorism, explore similarities and differences in the way terrorists and counterterrorists organize and strategize, approach the problem of securing support, engage in conflict and, in some cases, resolve their conflicts. Prerequisites: None

    CNCM 497 SPECIAL TOPICS IN CONFLICT MANAGEMENT (3)

    Topics cover a broad overview of the conflict managment field. Their primary emphasis is the study conflict and its management - from conflict behaviors to conflict intervention techniques. Students read about and discuss social conflict in a number of settings, ranging from interpersonal to international conflict.

  • OPRE: Operations Research

    OPRE 202 STATISTICAL DATA ANALYSIS (3)

    A second course in the statistical analysis of data related to business activities with emphasis on applications in various functional areas including accounting, finance, management, marketing and operations management, among others. Topics include estimation, hypothesis testing, contingency tables and chi-square test, analysis of variance and covariance, simple and multiple regression analysis and correlation analysis. Computer implementation using Excel-based statistical data analysis or other relevant software and interpretation of results for business applications are emphasized. prerequisites: OPRE 201 and basic computer skills.

    OPRE 315 BUSINESS APPLICATION OF DECISION SCIENCE (3)

    A study of managerial decision-making processes using a ¬decision-sciences approach. Topics include linear and integer models and decision analysis and their application in investment problems, media selection, market research, product mix, production planning, personnel scheduling and transportation design, among others. Special emphasis is on understanding the concepts and computer implementation and interpreting the results to write management reports. prerequisite: MATH 111 and Math 115

    OPRE 493 HONORS SEMINAR (3)

    An advanced interdisciplinary seminar that focuses on important books and issues and encourages independent thinking, clear presentation and an understanding of the concerns and methods of various disciplines. The course may be team taught; topic and instructor(s) may change from semester to semester. Course may be repeated for credit when topic changes. prerequisites: 3.3 GPA and permission of the Denit Honors Program director

    OPRE 494 HONORS PROJ/THESIS (3)

    Directed individual instruction in an advanced project of the student's choice; the project must be academically related to this discipline. Each student works closely with a faculty director who guides his/her progress. The project must be of honors quality and must be finally approved by both the faculty director and a second faculty member. Course is eligible for a continuing studies grade. prerequisites: 3.3 GPA and permission of both the Denit Honors Program director and the faculty director

    OPRE 497 SPECIAL TOPICS IN OPERATIONS RESEARCH (3)

    An intensive exploration of topics in the area of operations research. Refer to the semester class schedule for exact title of topic offered. This course may be repeated for credit when topic changes. prerequisites: determined by the instructor

    OPRE 499 INDEPENDENT STUDY: OPERATIONS RESEARCH (1 - 3)

    An ­independent study under the direction of a faculty member. For eligibility and procedures, refer to the Merrick School of Business Independent Study Policy.

  • PHIL: Philosophy

    PHIL 101 INTRODUCTION TO PHILOSOPHY (3)

    Introduces the fundamental questions and problems of philosophy and critically examines how some of the greatest philosophers in the history of Western cultures have attempted to answer these questions. Emphasis is placed on students’ demonstration of their own abilities to seek answers to these “eternal questions.” A capstone feature of the course challenges students to communicate, orally and in writing, the value of philosophical thinking in their personal lives and their chosen professions. [HIPL] [CTE] [HAT] [AH]

    PHIL 140 CONTEMPORARY MORAL ISSUES (3)

    Explores contemporary issues of ethical concern. Students are introduced to philosophical reasoning on controversial topics, including the responsibilities of corporations, war and violence, human relationships and other currently debated matters of public policy and personal ethics. The course aims to help students develop abilities to understand, evaluate and construct arguments in the realm of applied ethics. [HIPL] [CTE] [HAT] [AH] [IL]

    PHIL 150 CRITICAL THINKING AND ARGUMENTS (3)

    Explores the process of thinking critically and philosophically and guides students in thinking more clearly, insightfully and effectively. In addition, this course focuses on helping students identify, understand and critically assess philosophical arguments. Students use classic philosophic texts and real-world examples to develop both their critical-thinking skills and their ability (in written and oral forms) to formulate, express and critique arguments. [HIPL] [CTE] [HAT] [AH]

    PHIL 250 SOCIAL AND POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY (3)

    Examines the values and principles that establish and justify societies and that determine the rights and responsibilities of a society to its own members; of the members in relation to each other and to the society as a whole; and of a society in relation to other societies. The course considers the application of these principles to such issues as justice, human rights, political and social institutions, and international relations.

    PHIL 280 ENVIRONMENTAL ETHICS (3)

    Explores the relationship between humans and the nonhuman environment and guides students in thinking more clearly, insightfully and effectively about that relationship. Students read a wide array of classic and contemporary texts from a variety of philosophic traditions, and they are asked to consider some of the most pressing ethical, political and legal issues concerning our treatment of the environment. [HIPL] [CTE] [HAT] [AH]

    PHIL 301 ETHICS (3)

    A critical examination of fundamental questions in ethics: What is good and evil? Why be moral? What is right and wrong moral conduct? What does it take to be a good person, and what does it mean to live a good life? Students read a balanced selection of classical and contemporary works and explore a variety of moral issues in personal and professional life.

    PHIL 302 PHILOSOPHY OF COMMUNITY (3)

    Covers some of the basic concerns raised by the cosmopolitan liberalism and communitarian critique. The goals are to help students think through the arguments on each side of this debate and to help figure out for themselves the extent to which they want their lives and the policies of the communities in which they live to reflect either cosmopolitan liberal or communitarian commitments.

    PHIL 305 PROFESSIONAL ETHICS IN HUMAN SERVICES (3)

    An examination of values, moral principles and ethical issues inherent in, and related to, the human service professions. The major focus is directed toward determining the moral responsibilities of the human service professions and whether the moral responsibilities are being realized.

    PHIL 309 EASTERN RELIGIONS (3)

    A study of the history, beliefs and rituals of Hinduism, Buddhism, Taoism, Confucianism and Shinto

    PHIL 316 LOGIC OF LANGUAGE (3)

    An introduction to informal and formal logic. The use and abuse of language in general is first considered, then informal fallacies are examined. Next, deductive, inductive and analogical arguments are distinguished. The remainder of the course is devoted to examining the formal structures of descriptive language and the formal rules of logic.

    PHIL 317 ANCIENT PHILOSOPHY (3)

    A critical examination of the questions, systems and contributions of the most influential philosophers of Western antiquity. The pre-Socratics and their legacy of questions and world views are first considered. The philosophies of Plato and Aristotle are examined next in light of the attempts of both philosophers to deal with the inherited questions of pre-Socratics and the moral and cultural problems of their time. Concludes with a look at the Epicurean, Stoic and neo-Platonist philosophies and the influence of neo-Platonism on Christian theology.

    PHIL 319 MODERN PHILOSOPHY (3)

    Traces the development and influence of British empiricism and continental rationalism from the scientific revolution of the 17th century through the age of reason, the romantic rebellion and the industrial revolution, and the rise of nationalism. Philosophers to be studied are Descartes, Locke, Berkeley, Hume, Kant, Rousseau, Mill, Hegel, Marx and Nietzsche.

    PHIL 320 20TH CENTURY PHILOSOPHY (3)

    A critical examination of the most influential American and European philosophers of the 20th century. Emphasis is placed on the rebellion against 19th-century idealism and metaphysics as manifested in the two divergent and predominant contemporary philosophies: existentialism and analytic philosophy. Russell, Moore, Wittgenstein, Whitehead, Bergson, James, Dewey, Sartre, Kafka and Camus are among the philosophers considered.

    PHIL 322 PHILOSOPHY OF RELIGION (3)

    A critical examination of the fundamental beliefs of the major religions of the world (not, however, a course in the history of religions or of religious belief). The course reviews the rational justifications for such important beliefs as the existence of God, the existence and immortality of the soul, the existence of evil as compatible with a merciful god and the value of miracles, prayer and mystery. Concludes with a look at religious alternatives to traditional theism.

    PHIL 419 RELIGIONS IN AMERICA (3)

    A study of the historical and theological developments in Protestantism, Catholicism and Judaism on the American continent, from the colonial period to the present, including a consideration of the ways in which American civilization modified European religious traditions and developed new sects, cults and religious traditions.

    PHIL 490 THEORIES OF JUSTICE (3)

    A critical examination of the classical and contemporary theories of justice that are the foundations of Western law and morality. Among the philosophers studied are Plato, Hobbes, Locke, Kant, Rousseau, Bentham, Marx, Rawls and Hart. Emphasis is placed on each thinker’s treatment of such fundamental concepts as natural law and positive law, human rights and the common good, the social contract, sovereign rights and power, the forfeiture of “absolute” rights, individual liberty and property, and utilitarianism and intuitionism as theories of justice.

    PHIL 492 INDEPENDENT STUDY (1 - 6)

    Provides for individual work in research. prerequisites: presentation of a research proposal to the divisional chair, and permission of the chair and instructor

    PHIL 493 HONORS SEMINAR (3)

    An advanced interdisciplinary seminar that focuses on important books and issues and encourages independent thinking, clear presentation and an understanding of the concerns and methods of various disciplines. The course may be team taught; topic and instructor(s) may change from semester to semester. Course may be repeated for credit when topic changes. prerequisites: 3.5 GPA and permission of the Denit Honors Program director

    PHIL 494 HONORS PROJECT (1 - 6)

    Directed individual instruction in an advanced project of the student’s choice; the project must be academically related to this discipline. Each student works closely with a faculty director who guides his/her progress. The project must be of honors quality and must be finally approved by both the faculty director and a second faculty member. Course is eligible for a continuing studies grade. prerequisites: 3.5 GPA and permission of both the Denit Honors Program director and the faculty director

    PHIL 495 EXISTENTIALISM (3)

    An in-depth study of one of the most provocative philosophies of the modern age. The major works of the leading philosophers of the movement are examined as well as the expression of their philosophies in contemporary art, poetry, fiction and cinema.

    PHIL 496 INTERNATIONAL LAW AND MORALITY (3)

    Explores the relationship between international law and morality and guides students in thinking more clearly, insightfully and effectively about the various legal, political and social institutions that make up the international legal regime. Students read a wide array of classic and contemporary texts from a variety of philosophic traditions, and they are asked to consider some of the most pressing conceptual and ethical issues concerning international law. [GD]

    PHIL 497 SPECIAL TOPICS IN PHILOSOPHY (3)

    Intensive exploration of topics in philosophy of mutual interest to faculty and students. Content varies according to the concurrent interests of faculty and students. The subject studied appears under the Topics heading in the class schedule. Course may be repeated for credit when topic changes.

    PHIL 498 INTERNSHIP IN APPLIED ETHICS (1 - 3)

    Designed for students who wish to observe and gain firsthand experience of the practice of business and professional ethics at designated profit or nonprofit organizations in the Baltimore community. Students work with a mentor at the organization of their choice and write a substantial (25- to 30-page) critical essay on applied ethics. Eligible for a continuing studies (CS) grade. prerequisites: IDIS 302 or PHIL 301 or PHIL 305 and an interview with the director of the Hoffberger Center for Professional Ethics

    PHIL 499 CAPSTONE IN PHILOSOPHY, SOCIETY AND APPLIED ETHICS (3)

    A culmination of the student's program of study in the Philosophy, Society and Applied Ethics program. Required for all Philosophy, Society and Applied Ethics majors. Students consult with the instructor or another faculty member with relevant expertise to develop a mutually agreed upon capstone project that demonstrates the student's understanding of the relationship between philosophy and his or her chosen subfield. prerequisite: permission of program director; co-or prerequisite all other required courses in the major

  • PHSC: Physical Science

    PHSC 101 EARTH IN FOCUS (3)

    A study of the origins, composition and physical processes of our planet. The Earth’s land masses, bodies of water and atmosphere are examined. Natural phenomena such as earthquakes, volcanic eruptions and global weather patterns are explained. Includes a discussion of environmental issues that directly impact people, such as industrial pollution, depletion of natural resources and global warming. [GSCI] [QQT] [BPS]

  • PSYC: Psychology

    PSYC 100 INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY (3)

    PSYC 100 Introduction to Psychology (3) This survey course is an introduction to the science of psychology, with an explicit focus on the understanding of human behavior and experience. Methods used by psychologists to investigate behavior and experience are introduced, and an overview of the major fields of psychology is provided, including discussion of each area’s primary theories and models. [SOSC] [GIK] [QQT] [SBS]

    PSYC 200 INTRODUCTION TO PROFESSIONAL PRACTICES (3)

    Psychology majors learn the problems, methods, thinking styles, ethical standards and career opportunities of modern behavioral science and practice. Students participate in classroom discussion on topics of current concern in psychology, practice the writing style of the American Psychological Association and acquire effective methods for developing a professional resume. prerequisites: PSYC 100 and satisfaction of lower-division general-education requirement in composition or their equivalents [IL]

    PSYC 205 HUMAN DEVELOPMENT (3)

    The psychological aspects of the human growth and development process from conception and birth through childhood, adolescence, adulthood and old age. Included are the physical, social and emotional influences on the course of development in role, identity and goal orientation. prerequisite: PSYC 100

    PSYC 210 INTERPERSONAL PSYCHOLOGY (3)

    Provides an overview of the processes involved in the development, maintenance and dissolution of friendships and romantic relationships. Offers an examination of topics such as interpersonal attraction, love, sexuality, conflict and communication prerequisite: none

    PSYC 215 HUMAN SEXUALITY (3)

    Reviews the psychological literature on human sexuality, including behavioral patterns, life-cycle changes, interpersonal attraction and the scientific study of love. Sexual functioning throughout the lifespan is discussed, in addition to how it may be influenced by one’s gender, age, sexual orientation, religion, culture and racial/ethnic background. Topics may include female and male anatomy, love and sexuality, intimacy, trust and sexual expression, date rape, the sexual response cycle, sexually transmitted diseases, and birth control and contraception.

    PSYC 220 STRESS IDENTIFICATION AND MANAGEMENT (3)

    A study of the interaction between a human’s environment and psycho-physiological systems involved in the generation of stress and development of related disease processes. The use of electronic instrumentation in the evaluation and amelioration of stress reactions and ¬research is examined. Techniques and strategies of stress management are discussed. Laboratory fee required. pre¬requisite: PSYC 100 or an equivalent introductory psychology course or permission of the program director

    PSYC 230 BEHAVIOR MODIFICATION IN APPLIED SETTINGS (3)

    Application of operant learning theory to problems in everyday life. Students design, conduct and report on their own, self-regulated behavior change programs based on principles of the “ABC” model of learning. Topics include how to identify, define and collect information on problem behaviors, how to select effective consequences for those behaviors, and how to maintain desirable behaviors in new settings. No prior psychology coursework is required.

    PSYC 240 EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY (3)

    Applications of current psychological theories of learning, cognition and motivation within a variety of formal and informal educational settings. prerequisite: PSYC 100 or an equivalent introductory psychology course or permission of the program director

    PSYC 250 SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY (3)

    A consideration of the individual in social situations, and of the social environment as a source of psychological stimulations and social conflicts. Prerequisite: PSYC 100 or an equivalent introductory psychology course, or permission of program director.

    PSYC 260 PSYCHOLOGY OF RELIGION AND SPIRITUALITY (3)

    An in-depth, research-based survey of the study of the origins, development and consequences of religion and spirituality from a psychological perspective. The relationship between religion and social-psychological variables in particular is investigated. Religious experiences from a variety of perspectives, including the objective, Freudian, Jungian and humanistic, are examined. The relationship between science and religion is also addressed. prerequisite: PSYC 100 or an equivalent introductory psychology course or permission of the program director

    PSYC 270 POSITIVE PSYCHOLOGY (3)

    Provides an overview of the processes involved in developing and maintaining the strenghts and virtues that enable individuals and communities to thrive. Explores the correlates of life satisfaction and examines empirical science and practical strategies for promoting well-being, quality of life and resilience.. prerequisites: none

    PSYC 297 TOPICS IN PSYCHOLOGY (3)

    Introductory exploration of issues, concepts, and methods in psychology. Topics will vary according to interests of students and faculty; the current subject appears under the Topic heading in the class schedule. Course may be repeated when topic changes. Prerequisite: PSYC 100 or permission of program director.

    PSYC 300 HISTORY AND SYSTEMS IN PSYCHOLOGY (3)

    The historical development of the major schools and systems of psychology. The philosophical underpinnings of the discipline are discussed. Students are instructed in the social and cultural variables that contributed to the development of psychology as a science. Connections are made between the early schools of psychology and contemporary perspectives in psychology. The growth and development of applied psychology and the professionalization of psychology are also described. prerequisite: PSYC 100 or an equivalent introductory psychology course or permission of the program director

    PSYC 308 RESEARCH METHODS AND STATISTICS I (3)

    Integrated study of descriptive psychological research methods and corresponding statistical concepts. Topics include ethical considerations, observational and survey research techniques, graphing, central tendency and variability, correlation and linear regression. Students participate in data collection, data analysis and interpretation by means of the microcomputer Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) and in the writing of APA-style research reports. Laboratory fee required. prerequisites: PSYC 200, WRIT 300; COSC 100 OR INSS 100 OR INSS 300

    PSYC 309 RESEARCH METHODS AND STATISTICS II (3)

    Integrated study of experimental and quasi-experimental psychological research methods and corresponding statistical concepts. Topics include basic probability theory, the logic of hypothesis testing, simple and complex experimental design and analysis, internal and external validity of experimental results, and nonparametric research and analysis of techniques. Students participate in data collection, data analysis and interpretation by means of the microcomputer Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) and in the writing of APA-style research reports. Laboratory fee required. prerequisite: PSYC 308

    PSYC 315 MOTIVATION (3)

    An exploration of internal and external forces that initiate, direct and sustain behavior. This course examines biological, cognitive and social psychological theories of motivation and their applications in a variety of real-life contexts. Students are encouraged to consider how these theories can increase their understandings of their own and others’ behavior. prerequisite: PSYC 100 or an equivalent introductory psychology course or permission of the program director

    PSYC 320 INDUSTRIAL AND ORGANIZATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY (3)

    Psychological principles and methods applied to problems commonly encountered in business and industry. Topics include personnel selection and evaluation, training and development, attitudes and motivation, leadership, group dynamics, organizational structure and climate, and job design and working conditions. prerequisite: PSYC 100 or an equivalent introductory psychology course or permission of the program director

    PSYC 325 FORENSIC PSYCHOLOGY (3)

    A survey of the broad field of forensic psychology, including roles that psychological knowledge, theory and practice have played with respect to issues of law and the legal system. Topics include psychological theories of crime, the psychological evaluation of criminal suspects, factors influencing the reliability of eyewitness testimony and psychological models of jury selection, among others. Students also learn the opportunities, demands and responsibilities associated with careers as forensic psychologists. prerequisite: PSYC 100 or CRJU 306

    PSYC 330 HEALTH PSYCHOLOGY (3)

    Scientific psychology as applied to enhance health, prevent and treat disease, identify risk factors, improve the health-care system and shape public opinion with regard to health. The course focuses on the biopsychosocial model of health and the interactive influences of biological, behavioral and social factors on health, well-being and illness. prerequisite: PSYC 100 or an equivalent introductory psychology course or permission of the program director

    PSYC 335 THEORIES OF PERSONALITY (3)

    A study of contemporary theories attempting to describe, understand, explain, measure and predict the human as an integrated being. Laboratory fee required. prerequisite: PSYC 100 or an equivalent introductory psychology course or permission of the program director

    PSYC 340 COUNSELING PSYCHOLOGY (3)

    An introduction to the applied psychology field of counseling. History, theories and processes of counseling are surveyed, as are a variety of specializations and settings in which counseling is practiced. Discussions, demonstrations and exercises give students an opportunity to explore counseling psychology as a career path. prerequisite: PSYC 100 or an equivalent introductory psychology course or permission of the program director

    PSYC 345 COGNITIVE PSYCHOLOGY (3)

    An introduction to the scientific study of the mind, including historical and current issues, concepts, theoretical models, research methods and evidence regarding the physiological and psychological mechanisms, processes and content of thought. prerequisite: PSYC 100 or an equivalent introductory psychology course or permission of the program director

    PSYC 350 ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY (3)

    An analysis of abnormal behavior as a personal, social and societal concern. Research findings relevant to diagnostic and therapeutic issues are studied. prerequisite: PSYC 100 or an equivalent introductory psychology course or permission of the program director

    PSYC 355 INTERVIEWING PSYCHOLOGY (3)

    A consideration of the principles and techniques of the interview as a personnel selection or research tool. Designed for students interested in the utilization of interview information in applied settings.

    PSYC 360 CROSS-CULTURAL PSYCHOLOGY (3)

    Educates, sensitizes and stimulates students’ critical thinking about the role of culture relative to both consistencies and differences in human psychological functioning and social behavior. Focus is given to the effects of culture on human perceptions, emotions, expectations and values. Other areas that are explored are individualism vs. collectivism, moral reasoning, gender roles and how culture influences research strategies. prerequisite: PSYC 100 or equivalent [GD]

    PSYC 365 PSYCHOLOGY OF GENDER (3)

    Explores the psychological, sociocultural, emotional, behavioral and physiological influences on the lives of women and men. The course focuses specifically on the psychological literature that addresses the many ways gender affects our experience. This course is designed to facilitate greater understanding of the unique expectations, constraints, dilemmas and experiences that face women and men. prerequisite: PSYC 100

    PSYC 370 PSYCHOLINGUISTICS (3)

    An introduction to the study of the cognitive processes involved in how humans use language. Students learn about language from a psychological perspective, examining the cognitive aspects of meaning, understanding, communication, speech and language learning. Students learn the formal structure of language, how linguistic knowledge is represented and structured in the mind and how linguistic knowledge is utilized in the real-time processing of language. The course examines the biological and neurolinguistic foundations of language. Links with cognitive science, neuroscience and philosophy are also explored. Laboratory fee required. prerequisite: PSYC 100 or an equivalent introductory psychology course or permission of the program director

    PSYC 375 ENVIRONMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY (3)

    Explores interrelationships between humans and the physical environment, both natural and constructed. This course surveys theories and evidence from various subdisciplines in psychology and applies this knowledge to an understanding of how human behavior affects an environment and how that environment, in turn, influences behavior. The course also explores the manipulation of psychological variables to design environments that promote specific behaviors. prerequisite: PSYC 100 or an equivalent introductory psychology course

    PSYC 380 COMMUNITY PSYCHOLOGY (3)

    An introduction of psychology majors and others to the career path of community psychology. The interdependence among individuals, their communities, and their environments is explored, with foci on local and regional social issues and policies, underserved and marginalized groups, prevention of social and mental health problems and related concepts such as social justice and social change.

    PSYC 400 THEORIES OF LEARNING (3)

    Investigation of the factors and processes involved in the acquisition and maintenance of new behavior. Both historical and current learning theories representing the dominant schools of psychological thought are presented, including modern understandings of the evolution and physiology of learning. Applications of current learning theories in various real-world, human contexts also are discussed. prerequisite: PSYC 300

    PSYC 403 TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT (3)

    A comprehensive course designed to help the student develop the skills necessary to design and implement effective training programs. The course will investigate needs assessments, the development of appropriate training efforts, and the use of training program evaluations. Techniques included are the use of technology in CBT and web-based training. Prerequisites: PSYC 100 or equivalent introductory psychology class, or permission of the Program Director. Laboratory fee.

    PSYC 404 ORGANIZATIONAL CONSULTING (3)

    An upper-level, practitioner-oriented course. Students explore and develop skill sets necessary to consult successfully with various client systems. Using experiential learning settings, the focus is on demonstrating techniques of engaging, contracting, deploying interventions strategies and disengaging the client. Internal and external consulting models are included. Laboratory fee required. prerequisite: PSYC 100 or an equivalent introductory psychology course or permission of the program director

    PSYC 405 TESTS AND MEASUREMENTS (3)

    Introduction to the requirements for instruments used in the measurement of human behavior. Includes a study of the theory and methods of psychological measurement and a review of several representative types of tests. Laboratory fee required. prerequisites: PSYC 100 or an equivalent introductory psychology course and PSYC 309 or permission of the program director

    PSYC 410 Multicultural Psychology (3)

    Educates, sensitizes and stimulates students' critical thinking about various cultural identities (such as race, gender, and sexual orientation) and the intersection of multiple cultural identities. Includes discussion of underserved and marginalized groups and the prevention and remediation of social and mental health issues through social justice advocacy. Engages students in experiential activities, self-reflection exercises and classroom discussions focused on the interdependence among individuals, communities and institutions in society, and how the cycle of socialization perpetuates systemic oppression and imbalances of power and privilege in society.

    PSYC 413 PSYCHOPATHOLOGY (3)

    An upper-division course preparing students for practice in any health-related field or for graduate school. Students learn about the symptoms, etiology, course, outcome and (to a minor extent) treatment of the major child and adult mental disorders from a biopsychosocial and multicultural perspective. Course materials focus on original sources and scholarly reviews to encourage critical and integrative thinking. prerequisites: PSYC 100 or an equivalent introductory psychology course and PSYC 350 or an equivalent abnormal psychology course or permission of the program director

    PSYC 415 EVOLUTIONARY PSYCHOLOGY (3)

    Aspects of human psychology are examined from the perspective that current, species-common human thought processes and behaviors may be understood as evolved adaptations to problems faced by our evolutionary ancestors. Topics include environmental preferences and survival responses, male and female mating and parental attitudes and behaviors, and kinship-based and reciprocal altruism. prerequisites: PSYC 100 and PSYC 300 or permission of the program director

    PSYC 425 SENSATION & PERCEPTION (3)

    A study of the sensory processes and the methods and techniques for their measurement with emphasis on experimental study of perception. Laboratory fee required. prerequisites: PSYC 100 or an equivalent introductory psychology course and PSYC 309 or permission of the program director

    PSYC 430 PHYSIOLOGICAL PSYCHOLOGY (3)

    A study of the biological substrates of behavior. The role of the central nervous system and its relationships to other physiological processes are examined as they affect the organism’s adaptation to its environment. Laboratory fee required. prerequisite: PSYC 100 or an equivalent introductory psychology course or permission of the program director

    PSYC 445 PSYCHOLOGY OF AGING (3)

    A survey of the psychological theories of aging and the psychological changes in intellectual, emotional and social functioning; neuropsychological dysfunctions; and review of issues associated with retirement and economic self-maintenance. prerequisite: PSYC 100 or an equivalent introductory psychology course or permission of the program director

    PSYC 446 DEATH, DYING AND BEREAVEMENT (3)

    The profound influence of death on human behavior and its associated psychological effects. Death-related variables are identified and evaluated as to their contributions to the development of individual differences across the life span. Discussions center on current research and clinical findings about anxiety, depression, guilt, conflict and defense mechanisms, as well as techniques for death education and bereavement counseling. prerequisite: PSYC 100 or an equivalent introductory psychology course or permission of the program director

    PSYC 455 WORKSHOP IN COUNSELING (1 - 4)

    A practicum experience for students to function as helping persons in a professional setting with intense supervision. prerequisites: PSYC 100 or an equivalent introductory psychology course and PSYC 340 or an equivalent counseling psychology course and permission of the program director

    PSYC 490 SENIOR PROJECT IN PSYCHOLOGY (3)

    The capstone experience for psychology majors. Students design and conduct original quantitative or qualitative studies of psychological topics of personal interest or complete intensive psychology-focused internships. Students share their own project problems, progress and outcomes in a weekly seminar. Completed projects are reported both in an APA-style paper and a formal oral presentation. Grading: pass/fail. prerequisite: PSYC 200, PSYC 300, PSYC 308, PSYC 309 or equivalents; senior status

    PSYC 493 HONORS SEMINAR (3)

    An advanced interdisciplinary seminar that focuses on important books and issues and encourages independent thinking, clear presentation and an understanding of the concerns and methods of various disciplines. The course may be team taught; topic and instructor(s) may change from semester to semester. Course may be repeated for credit when topic changes. prerequisites: 3.5 GPA and permission of the Denit Honors Program director

    PSYC 494 HONORS PROJECT (3 - 6)

    Directed individual instruction in an advanced project of the student’s choice; the project must be academically related to this discipline. Each student works closely with a faculty director who guides his/her progress. The project must be of honors quality and must be finally approved by both the faculty director and a second faculty member. Course is eligible for a continuing studies grade. prerequisites: 3.5 GPA and permission of both the Denit Honors Program director and the faculty director

    PSYC 497 TOPICS IN PSYCHOLOGY (3)

    An intensive exploration of topics in psychology of mutual interest to faculty and students. Content varies according to their concurrent interests. The subject studied appears under the Topics heading in the class schedule. Course may be repeated for credit when topic changes. prerequisite: permission of the program director

    PSYC 499 SPECIAL PROJECTS IN PSYCHOLOGY (1 - 3)

    The pursuit of independent work under the supervision of a faculty member. Projects may include research in the laboratory or the library, supervised work in a psychological clinic or laboratory or at a training facility in a class. A student may earn up to 9 hours in this course but cannot take more than 3 hours per semester. Exact course credit for any project is determined by the program director. Course is eligible for a continuing studies grade. prerequisite: permission of the program director

    PSYC IRR INTER- INSTITUTIONAL COURSE (3)

    INTER- INSTITUTIONAL COURSE

  • REED: Real Estate/Economic Developmt

    REED 312 REAL ESTATE PRINCIPLES AND TRANSACTION (3)

    Identifies the framework in which the acquisition and development of real estate are arranged. Particular attention is paid to financing techniques and the underlying financial structures involved in real estate investment choices. Emphasis is placed on development issues including site acquisition and evaluation, environmental regulation, market analysis and interaction with constituent groups.

    REED 315 REAL PROPERTY LAW (3)

    Focuses on how law impacts real estate, its ownership, conveyance and development. Emphasis is on real property ownership interests, restrictions on such interests, methods of transferring such interests, private and public land use controls, and legal transactions involving real estate, such as gifts, sales and leases. prerequisite: BULA 151 or equivalent

    REED 475 REAL ESTATE MARKET ANALYSIS (3)

    Emphasizes real estate markets with specific attention given to understanding the market forces affecting real estate at the urban and regional levels. The main focus is on providing insight into the operation of urban land and nonresidential markets and the process of urban growth and regional development. Prerequisites: REED 312 / Merrick School of Business student or by permission of the instructor.

    REED 480 PROPERTY MANAGEMENT (3)

    This course addresses the issues involved with managing commercial property including residential, office, retail and industrial. Topics include tenant relations and retention, insurance and risk management, leasing, environmental issues, and maintenance. Prerequisite: REED 312

    REED 495 INTERNSHIP IN REAL ESTATE AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT (3)

    Provides students with practical real world experience in an organization. The course requires a minimum of 120 hours of practical work with a qualified firm based on explicit statements of student responsibilities and faculty/firm monitoring mechanism. Students will work closely with both the firm and a faculty member. Prerequisite: completion of 9 hours of real estate courses, with a minimum GPA of 3.0. Completion of MGMT 330 is recommended. Permission of the department chair is required..

    REED 497 SPECIAL TOPICS IN REAL ESTATE (3)

    The real estate faculty, from time to time, offer an opportunity to integrate new material into the undergraduate program reflecting changes in the field and in the educational needs of students. Prerequisite ECON 312

  • SOCI: Sociology

    SOCI 100 INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY (3)

    Provides an introduction to basic concepts, theoretical principles and research methods of sociology and applies these tools to the analysis of human societies, including the study of social structures and institutions such as the family and religion, culture, social interaction, groups, social inequality, deviance and social change. [GIK] [QQT] [SBS]

    SOCI 204 SOC OF LAW ENFORCEMENT (3)

    No course description available.

    SOCI 210 SOCIAL DEVIANCE (3)

    Provides an examination of deviance and social control in a societal context. Emphasis is placed on what, how and why certain forms of behavior come to be defined as deviant, the regulation of such behavior and the ways in which deviants are labeled and treated. Major theories of deviance will be used to examine such topics as sexual expression, drug use and addictions, mental and physical health, aggression and violence, suicide, religious cults, cyber-activities, homelessness and elite deviance.

    SOCI 301 SOCIAL PROBLEMS (3)

    A study of factors contributing to the disintegration of social living. Topics studied include juvenile delinquency, sexual adjustment, poverty, personal disorganization, changing worker-management roles and migration.

    SOCI 302 THE AMERICAN FAMILY IN PERSPECTIVE (3)

    A study of the contemporary American family in terms of its historical background, the impact of the 20th-century culture and significant factors that influence marital relations and family living.

    SOCI 303 URBAN SOCIOLOGY (3)

    An ecological approach to urban society emphasizing the dynamics of urban regions as demonstrated in their growth and structure. The values and methods people have employed to achieve desired ends are examined in the light of modern industrialization and communication. Special emphasis is given to factors of race, housing, planning and organization.

    SOCI 304 HUMAN ECOLOGY (3)

    The dynamics of human population as affected by environmental factors with special emphasis on those individual living habits and practices that alter one’s physical environment.

    SOCI 310 SOCIAL THEORY (3)

    Examination of theories of social organization and social change with particular attention to leading contributors to social thought in the Western world, their work, their social setting and the relation of their study to subsequent social thought.

    SOCI 311 CONTEMPORARY SOCIAL THEORY (3)

    Structure and function of modern social theory. Functional conflict, interaction and exchange theories are compared with structure and function of modern social theory and with paradigms for examining institutional and organizational norms in society. prerequisite: SOCI 310

    SOCI 312 COMMUNITY ORGANIZATION PRACTICE AND ANALYSIS (3)

    Concepts of community are examined and applied to the delivery of human services. Perspectives are developed by which community organizations may be analyzed. Organizational techniques and the roles of voluntary community organizations are discussed.

    SOCI 317 SOCIOLOGY OF POVERTY (3)

    Examines the sources and dynamics of poverty in contemporary society from a sociological perspective. Human service, income and job programs designed specifically to address the needs of the poor are reviewed and critiqued. Special attention is given to groups disproportionately found in poverty, such as the young, the old and the disabled.

    SOCI 380 RACE & ETHNIC RELATIONS (3)

    Examines the sources and dynamics of poverty in contemporary society from a sociological perspective. Human service, income and job programs designed specifically to address the needs of the poor are reviewed and critiqued. Special attention is given to groups disproportionately found in poverty, such as the young, the old and the disabled.

    SOCI 413 INDUSTRIAL SOCIOLOGY (3)

    Emphasis is placed on the meaning of work, economic and occupational systems, changes within occupational structure and the causes of these changes. Major themes are social theory and productive systems, occupational associations and trade unionism, occupational mobility and social power, the structure of industry and the labor market and interrelationships between industry and the wider community.

    SOCI 420 SOCIAL STRATIFICATION (3)

    An analysis of the correlates of class, mobility, status, power, and conflict.

    SOCI 460 GENDER ROLES AND SOCIETY (3)

    An examination of the cultural, biological, psychological and historical development and interdependence between male and female sex roles. Topics include the influence of heredity and environment, stereotypes and stigmas, and the position of men and women within such institutional areas as law and education, religion, health, the economy and the political system.

    SOCI 470 THE SOCIOLOGY OF INFORMATION (3)

    An exploration of the nature of information and its organization, control and use in our society. Topics include the relation of information to public policy decision-making, issues related to privacy and access, and the use of information as a form of power in societal institutions.

    SOCI 493 HONORS SEMINAR (3)

    An advanced interdisciplinary seminar that focuses on important books or issues and encourages independent thinking, clear presentation and an understanding of the content and methods of various disciplines. The course is team taught; subject and instructors may change from semester to semester. prerequisites: 3.5 GPA or recommendation of the student’s major division chair and permission of both the instructor and the Denit Honors Program director

    SOCI 494 HONORS PROJECT (3 - 6)

    An advanced interdisciplinary seminar that focuses on important books or issues and encourages independent thinking, clear presentation and an understanding of the content and methods of various disciplines. The course is team taught; subject and instructors may change from semester to semester. prerequisites: 3.5 GPA or recommendation of the student’s major division chair and permission of both the instructor and the Denit Honors Program director

    SOCI 497 SPECIAL TOPICS IN SOCIOLOGY (3)

    Intensive exploration of topics in sociology of mutual interest to faculty and students. Content varies according to the concurrent interests of faculty and students. The subject studied appears under the Topics heading in the class schedule. Course may be repeated for credit when topic changes.

    SOCI 498 SEMINAR IN SOCIOLOGY (3)

    Group and individual study of the major contributors to sociological thought. Theorists are studied in the context of their historical situation and the social problems current during their lifetimes. Stratification, power, functionalism and systems theory are studied in relation to actual methods. prerequisite: SOCI 310

    SOCI 499 INDEPENDENT STUDY IN SOCIOLOGY (1 - 6)

    Provides students with the opportunity to pursue a research topic or special project in sociology. Each student works closely with a faculty member who helps set goals, develop a course plan and guide progress. The project must be carefully planned and have approval of the instructor involved and of the program director. prerequisite: permission of both the instructor and the program director

  • UNIV: Sophomore Seminar

    UNIV 201 SOPHOMORE SEMINAR: INTELLECTUAL TRANSITIONS (3)

    (Reserved for CAS students ) Serves as a bridge from the first year to a student’s major area of study, building on skills gained in First-Year Seminar: Introduction to University Learning, learning communities and other general education courses. All sophomores participate in a common academic experience designed to enhance their critical thinking and to enable them to make connections among their academic work, personal aspirations and professional goals. Student engage a common reading across seminar sections, exploring academic discourse in broad areas, and apply core skills in communication, research, information literacy and team building to real-world issues. prerequisite: WRIT 101; prerequisite or corequisite: INFO 110 (may be waived for students who enroll with 45 credits or more) [CTE]

    UNIV 202 SOPHOMORE SEMINAR: INTELLECTUAL TRANSITIONS (3)

    (Reserved for CPA students) Serves as a bridge from the first year to a student's major area of study, building on skills gained in First-Year Seminar: Introduction to University learning, learning communities and other general-education courses. All sophomores participate In a common academic experience designed to enhance their critical-thinking and to enable them to make connections among their academic work, personal aspirations and professional goals. Students engage a common reading across seminar sections, exploring academic discourse in broad areas, and apply core skills in communication, research, information literacy and team building to real-world issues. Prerequisite: WRIT 101; prerequisite or corequisite INFO 110 (may be waived for students who enroll with 45 credits or more). ) [CTE]

    UNIV 203 SOPHOMORE SEMINAR: INTELLECTUAL TRANSITIONS (3)

    (Reserved for MSB students ) Serves as a bridge from the first year to a student's major area of study, building on skills gained in First-Year Seminar: Introduction to University Learning, learning communities and other general-education courses. All sophomores participate in a common academic experience designed to enhance their critical-thinking and to enable them to make connections among their academic work, personal aspirations and professional goals. Students engage a common reading across seminar sections, exploring academic discourse in broad areas, and apply core skills in communication, research, information literacy and team building to real-world issues. prerequisite: WRIT 101; prerequisite or corequisite: INFO 110 (may be waived for students who enroll with 45 credits or more). [CTE]

  • SPAN: Spanish

    SPAN 125 INTRODUCTION TO SPANISH I (3)

    The first semester of the process toward building the "five skills": listening, speaking, reading, writing, and understanding culture. With these goals in mind, students participate in variety of learning tasks during required classroom hours and weekly laboratory sessions.[AH]

    SPAN 126 INTRODUCTION TO SPANISH II (3)

    A second level course in the "five skills" needed to improve fluency in Spanish: listening, speaking, reading, writing and understanding culture. Students continue to improve their language skills and learn to speak Spanish for situations likely to take place outside the classroom. Prerequisite : Span 125 or equivalent. [AH]

    SPAN 297 TOPICS IN SPANISH (3)

    Exploration of topics in Spanish language. Content varies depending upon the interests of faculty and students. Course may be repeated when topic changes. Prerequisite: Depends on course topic and level of difficulty.

    SPAN 470 SPANISH-- INDEPENDENT STUDY (1 - 3)

    Designed to provide credit for a student who wants to pursue independent work under the supervision of a faculty member. The number of credits earned is determined by the supervising faculty member before the study begins. Prerequisite: SPAN 125, SPAN 126 and approval of instructor [AH]

    SPAN 497 ADVANCED TOPICS IN SPANISH (3)

    Exploration of advanced topics in Spanish. Content varies depending upon the interests of faculty and students. Course may be repeated when topic changes. Prerequisite: Depends on course topic and level of difficulty. [AH]

    SPAN IRU INTER-INSTITUTIONAL COURSE (3)

    No course description available.

  • WRIT: Writing

    WRIT 100 READING AND WRITING PROCESS FOR COLLEGE COMPOSITION (3)

    Corequisite study with WRIT 101 to help students use reading, writing, discussion and research for discovery, intellectual curiosity and personal academic growth. Students work in collaborative groups to share, critique and revise their reading and writing. They compose a variety of documents for a range of academic audiences; develop a metacognitive understanding of their reading, writing and thinking processes; and improve their college-level reading and writing skills as they learn to adopt and adapt recursive writing processes. Pre-requisite: Directed Self Placement Co-requisite: College Composition

    WRIT 101 COLLEGE COMPOSITION (3)

    Helps students develop fluency in writing clear, forceful, effective prose and acquire the college-level reasoning, reading and writing skills that they will find necessary for success in other college courses. prerequisite: adequate score on placement test or completion of designated developmental writing courses with a grade of C- or higher [WRIT] [COM] [COMP]

    WRIT 101A COLLEGE COMPOSITION (3)

    Helps students develop fluency in writing clear, forceful, effective prose and acquire the college-level reasoning, reading and writing skills that they will find necessary for success in other college courses. prerequisite: adequate score on placement test or completion of designated developmental writing courses with a grade of C- or higher [WRIT] [COM] [COMP] co-requisite: Reading And Writing Process For College Composition (WRIT 100).

    WRIT 190 ENGLISH COMP TUTORIAL (1)

    Fundamental methods for developing expository essays, exploring how writers use descriptions, stories, ­reasoning, and the techniques of persuasion in essays that aim to define, identity, classify, analyze, compare, and contrast events, objects and ideas. Although primary emphasis is on the forms of the essay as a whole, students also learn principles of organization and cohesion at the sentence and paragraph level. With the instructor’s guidance, students practice strategies for brainstorming, planning, drafting, and revising their essays. Short readings are assigned as models and examples of forms of discourse students. Restricted to students who have not already fulfilled the lower-­division English Composition requirement.

    WRIT 200 PRACTICUM IN WRITING (3)

    Designed to review skills developed in WRIT 101 or equivalent and prepare students for successful completion of WRIT 300. Students build skills in critical reading, rhetorical analysis and writing from sources while maintaining a focus on textual conventions. Students write in a variety of genres for inclusion in a final course portfolio. Passing grade is C-or higher. prerequisite: adequate score on placement or placement waiver

    WRIT 300 COMPOSITION AND RESEARCH (3)

    This course helps students expand their skills in writing effective prose for a variety of audiences, including academic, professional and personal. The course, which emphasizes discipline-specific writing projects, builds on skills previously acquired in lower-level writing courses. It is designed to help students develop additional writing skills needed for success in college and their respective majors. prerequisites: Successful completion of WRIT 101 or equivalent; and a qualifying score on the Upper-Division Writing Placement Test or successful completion of WRIT 200. [WRIT] [COM] [UCOMP]