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Graduate Course Descriptions

Browse the course descriptions of all graduate courses that the University of Baltimore offers.

  • ACCT: Accounting

    ACCT 505 ACCOUNTING ESSENTIALS (1.50)

    Introduces students to the basics of corporate financial reporting and financial statement analysis from the manager’s perspective. Emphasizes the analysis of financial statements and provides an overview of U.S. Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP) and International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS) rules for most critical accounting items. prerequisite: graduate standing

    ACCT 510 INTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTING I (3)

    A study of financial accounting standard-setting, the conceptual framework underlying financial accounting, balance sheet and income statement presentations, revenue and expense recognition, and accounting for current assets and current liabilities. Prerequisite: ACCT 505 or equivalent.

    ACCT 511 INTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTING II (3)

    This course focuses on issues related to the reporting and analysis of financial accounting information. The objective in this course is to examine in detail (with an emphasis on both the "what" and the "why") the following financial topics: 1) Operational Assets 2) Time value of money 3) Bonds and long term notes 4) Leases 5) Employee benefits and pensions. Prerequisite: ACCT 510 or equivalent

    ACCT 512 Auditing (3)

    A study of generally accepted auditing standards with emphasis on professional standards, planning, internal control, audit evidence, audit sampling and standard reports for the various attestation functions. Prerequisite: ACCT 505 or equivalent

    ACCT 513 Intermediate Accounting III (3)

    A comprehensive view of financial accounting concepts and principles, an intensive look at the nature and determination of the major financial statements, and an examination of current accounting practice, theory, and literature. Topics include shareholders' equity, investments, income taxes, earnings per share, accounting changes, error analysis, and statement of cash flows. Prerequisite: Completed or concurrent enrollment in ACCT 511.

    ACCT 514 Fundamentals of Income Taxation (3)

    A study and analysis of the federal income tax structure with emphasis on the taxation of individuals. Topics include income determination, deductions, property transactions, credits and procedures, and an introduction to corporation and partnership taxation, tax planning and ethical issues. Prerequisite: ACCT 505 or equivalent.

    ACCT 601 FORENSIC ACCOUNTING PRINCIPLES (3)

    Provides an overview of the field of forensic accounting, focusing on the roles, responsibilities and requirements of a forensic accountant in both litigation and fraud engagements. Examines basic litigation and fraud examination theory, identifies financial fraud schemes, explores the legal framework for damages and fraud and damage assessments and methodologies, and reviews earning management and financial reporting fraud. Other topics include computer forensics and corporate governance and ethics. Actual litigation and fraud cases are used to highlight the evolving roles of forensic accounting. ACCT 505 or equivalent.

    ACCT 602 DISSECTING FINANCIAL STATEMENT (3)

    Students learn how to review, detect and investigate possible financial statement concerns of publicly and privately held businesses, as well as those of nonprofit organizations and family businesses. Topics include legal elements of financial statement fraud, management’s and auditors’ responsibilities, improper revenue/sales recognition, inadequate disclosure of related-party transactions, improper asset valuation, improper deferral of costs and expenses, financial statement red flags and inadequacies in management’s discussion and analysis. Students learn how to detect and investigate possible financial statement problems by addressing such factors as off-balance sheet activity, liquidity, financial performance indicators, unreported intangibles and lease auditing. Prerequisite: ACCT 505 or equivalent.

    ACCT 603 INVESTIGATIVE ACCOUNTING AND FRAUD EXAMINATION (3)

    Topics include the in-depth review of sophisticated fraud schemes, how fraudulent conduct can be deterred, how allegations of fraud should be investigated and resolved, the recovery of assets, methods of writing effective reports and complying with SAS 82 and other fraud standards. Fraud and investigation topics cover acts of skimming, cash larceny, check tampering, register disbursement schemes, billing schemes, payroll and expense reimbursement schemes, improper accounting of inventory and other assets, corruption, bribery, conflicts of interest, security fraud, insurance fraud, anti-terrorist financing and money laundering. Prerequisite: ACCT 505 or equivalent.

    ACCT 604 LITIGATION SUPPORT (3)

    Addresses the relationship between the forensic accounting professional and the litigation process in which he or she may play a role. Specifically, this course covers the litigation process, the legal framework for damages and fraud, damage assessment methodologies, issues related to the presentation of evidence through expert testimony, practices used in supporting divorce cases and basic rules of evidence as they apply to forensic accountants. Prerequisite: ACCT 505 or equivalent.

    ACCT 605 PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT AND ACCOUNTING CONTROLS (3)

    Focuses on how managers can use accounting information in the budgeting process to assist them in planning, controlling and making decisions. Introduces students to internal controls, corporate governance and enterprise risk management. Prerequisites: ACCT 505 or equivalent.

    ACCT 630 Financial Statement Analysis (3)

    Explores theoretical and conceptual foundations of generally accepted accounting principles. Integrates U.S. generally accepted accounting principles to develop students' understanding of financial statement analysis. Case materials and financial statements of U.S. and international companies are incorporated. Topics include standard setting, financial statement presentation issues, measurement issues (including fair-value accounting) and classification and recognition issues. Prerequisite: ACCT 505 or equivalent

    ACCT 650 Law, Regulation and Professional Responsibilities (3)

    The course provides rigorous overview of theoretical and practical aspects of Law, Regulation, and Professional Responsibilities for Certified Public Accountants. The course covers legal issues pertaining to agency, contracts, debtor-creditor relationships, securities and employment law. The course also covers ethical and professional standards for certified public accountants.

    ACCT 655 TAX POLICY (3)

    Explores the evolution and structure of the federal income tax system from a public policy perspective. Focus is placed on legal, economic, social and practical considerations. Alternatives, including current legislative proposals, are considered. Students prepare a research paper on a topic related to tax policy.

    ACCT 680 TAXATION OF ENTITIES (3)

    Covers federal income taxation of corporations, partnerships, estates and trusts as well as the taxation of gifts and estates. Analysis includes consideration of the sources of tax law, weight or authority, ethical issues, planning and administrative procedures. prerequisite: ACCT 405 or equivalent

    ACCT 701 ACCOUNTING ETHICS (3)

    ACCT 701: Accounting Ethics - Considers business ethics issues within an accounting context from a multiple stakeholder perspective. Ethical theories, codes of ethics relevant to accountants, corporate governance and professional and corporate social responsibility are covered. The course emphasizes the application of concepts such as professionalism, integrity, independence and objectivity to individual decision-making.

    ACCT 702 Federal and State Government Accounting (3)

    This course covers the basic of federal, state and local (municipal) accounting with particular focus on fund accounting and issues specific to the accounting by the US Federal Government. The course coverage will roughly approximate the curriculum of Parts II and III of Exam II of Certified Government Financial Manager examination.

    ACCT 720 DESIGN OF MANAGERIAL COST AND CONTROL SYSTEMS (3)

    Explores the design of cost and control systems for decision-making and for measurement of the performance of processes, product lines, managers and organizational competitiveness. Case studies highlight the experiences of companies, and include modifying cost and control systems in response to technological, institutional and global changes. prerequisites: ACCT 306, ACCT 605 or equivalent

    ACCT 740 ADVANCED TOPICS IN ASSURANCE SERVICES (3)

    A study of the application of generally accepted auditing standards to auditing practice issues, of academic and practitioner research, of internal auditing, of EDP auditing and of governmental auditing issues. prerequisite: ACCT 512 or equivalent

    ACCT 752 Topics in Accounting Systems (3)

    A study of fundamental accounting system concepts, the utilization of accounting system technology to establish security and controls, accounting system development, documentation and data base implementation and the internal controls of accounting information. Projects use AIS applications on the revenue, expense, production and payroll cycles. Prerequisite: ACCT 505 or equivalent

    ACCT 755 GOVERNMENTAL AND NOT-FOR-PROFIT ACCOUNTING (3)

    An advanced study of generally accepted accounting principles and procedures of governmental units and not-for-profit organizations, emphasizing current issues, external financial reporting and the relevant authoritative accounting pronouncements. Topics include characteristics and types of not-for-profit organizations, accounting and reporting entity, fund accounting, budgetary accounts, contributions received and made, investments and the encumbrance system. prerequisite: ACCT 511 or equivalent

    ACCT 761 ACCOUNTING FOR HEALTH-CARE ORGANIZATIONS (3)

    Covers financial reporting, analysis and strategy principles applied to for-profit and not-for-profit health-care organizations. Financial and managerial accounting issues related to strategic decision-making are emphasized. Review of the authoritative health-care accounting literature, overview of the health-care accounting environment, issues in revenue and expense recognition, balance sheet valuations, budgetary control systems, cost accounting, performance measurement, and the financial implications of third-party payment systems and managed-care arrangements. prerequisite: ACCT 505

    ACCT 762 ACCOUNTING FOR MEDICARE REGULATION (3)

    Focuses on principles and applications of Medicare payment systems and rate regulation for health-care providers, emphasizing understanding the Medicare system, developing the technical skills required to identify and research problems in Medicare payments, isolating relevant regulatory issues and developing documentary support and arguments for proposed solutions to problems in health-care payment claims. Topics include Medicare and the American health-care system, Part A hospital insurance benefits, Part B supplementary medical insurance benefits, exclusions from coverage, fraud and abuse, physician self-referral, payments rules, cost reports, claims and appeals, and managed care plans. prerequisite: ACCT 505 or equivalent

    ACCT 770 SEMINAR IN CURRENT TOPICS IN ACCOUNTING (3)

    A study of current developments and contemporary problems in accounting. Topics vary from year to year. A significant writing and research experience is provided. prerequisite: ACCT 511 or equivalent

    ACCT 780 SUSTAINABILITY ACCOUNTING (3)

    Sustainability accounting concerns the process of identifying, measuring and reporting the entities’ impact on the planet with a focus mainly on the environmental impact. Determining how different entities affect the environment, measuring that impact and deciding what, how and to whom to report this impact are all part of this course. The course will cover topics dealing with greenhouse gas emission, trading and sustainability investing. prerequisite: ACCT 605

    ACCT 792 Special Topics in Accounting (1.50)

    Specialized topics in accounting, allowing flexibility for both the changing developments in accounting and the educational needs of students. Exact topics and prerequisite structure appear in the schedule of classes. prerequisite: ACCT 605

    ACCT 795 GRADUATE ACCOUNTING INTERNSHIP (3)

    Students will attain professional accounting experience and work on assigned projects within a workplace accounting environment. Requirements include a work supervisor evaluation, a journal detailing the work experience, and a self-assessment of the student's internship experience. Prerequisite: Admission to the MS in Accounting and Business Advisory Services Program and permission of the graduate director of the accounting program.

    ACCT 797 SPECIAL TOPICS IN ACCOUNTING (3)

    Specialized topics in accounting, allowing flexibility for both the changing developments in accounting and the educational needs of students. Exact topics and prerequisite structure appear in the schedule of classes. prerequisite: ACCT 605

    ACCT 799 INDIVIDUAL RESEARCH (3)

    prerequisites: approval of accounting instructor, department chair and academic adviser

  • APPL: Applied Psychology

    APPL 601 THE BIOLOGICAL BASIS OF BEHAVIOR (3)

    Survey of the anatomical structures and physiological processes that underlie psychological functioning. Topics include the role of the central nervous system and the sensory, endocrine and muscular systems as they contribute to the individual’s adaptations to internal and external environments. Lab fee required. Prerequisite:This course is open only to the following majors: Applied Psychology or Certificate in Professional Counseling Studies. Other majors may take this course with departmental permission only.

    APPL 602 PROFESSIONAL IDENTITY, ETHICS, AND LEGAL ISSUES IN THE PRACTICE OF COUNSELING AND PSYCHOLOGY (3)

    Focuses on the development of professional identity, pathways to credentialing and licensure and legal and ethical Issues in professional counseling and psychology. Students examine professional organizations, credentialing bodies and the ethical codes relevant to the practice of counseling and psychology. Emphasis on ethical standards of the American Counseling Association and resolution of ethical dilemmas through the application of an ethical decision-making model. Prerequisite: This course is open only to the following majors: Applied Psychology or Certificate in Professional Counseling Studies. Other majors may take this course with departmental permission only.

    APPL 603 LEARNING AND COGNITION (3)

    Study of the major theories and models of human learning from both the traditional behaviorist perspective and the contemporary cognitive perspective and an experiential overview of how people acquire, store and use information. Theoretical and empirical information is applied to the understanding of human behavior in a wide variety of settings. Prerequisite:This course is open only to the following majors: Applied Psychology or Certificate in Professional Counseling Studies. Other majors may take this course with departmental permission only.

    APPL 604 INTERVIEWING (3)

    The interview as an informational, research and clinical tool. Interview formats and their construction, as well as the skills required for their utilization, are reviewed. The relationship of the interview to other information-gathering procedures is considered. Lab fee required. Prerequisite:This course is open only to the following majors: Applied Psychology or Certificate in Professional Counseling Studies. Other majors may take this course with departmental permission only.

    APPL 605 ADVANCED THEORIES OF PERSONALITY AND COUNSELING (3)

    Survey of major theories of counseling. Psychodynamic and humanistic theories of psychopathology and applications to clinical problems from each approach are included. Prerequisite:This course is open only to the following majors: Applied Psychology or Certificate in Professional Counseling Studies. Other majors may take this course with departmental permission only.

    APPL 606 BASIC COUNSELING TECHNIQUES (3)

    Basic skills and techniques required for conducting counseling sessions. Listening skills, initial interviewing, taking case histories, etc., are explored. Basically experiential in nature, with students practicing and evaluating counseling styles and abilities and participating in varied classroom activities such as mock counseling interviews. Lab fee required. prerequisite: APPL 605 or permission of instructor. This course is open only to the following majors: Applied Psychology or Certificate in Professional Counseling Studies.

    APPL 607 BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE (3)

    Examination of theory and practice in the field of behavioral medicine, emphasizing the role of mind-body interaction in physical health and illness as well as approaches to prevention, diagnosis and treatment of physical disease and psychophysiological dysfunction. Topics include doctor-patient communication, specific physical conditions, modification of health behavior and coping strategies. Prerequisite:This course is open only to the following majors: Applied Psychology or Certificate in Professional Counseling Studies. Other majors may take this course with departmental permission only.

    APPL 608 APPLIED ASSESSMENT PROCEDURES (3)

    Exploration of current procedures employed in the evaluation of behavior. Attention to the observation and interpretation of behavioral information and its relationship to choice of assessment procedures. Representative measures of intelligence, achievement, aptitude, personality and psychological motor functioning are reviewed. Lab fee required. Prerequisite:This course is open only to the following majors: Applied Psychology or Certificate in Professional Counseling Studies. Other majors may take this course with departmental permission only.

    APPL 609 OCCUPATIONAL STRESS AND HEALTH PSYCHOLOGY (3)

    Survey of the organizational environment that affects cognitive processes and subsequent physiological, psychological and behavioral responses affecting individual and organizational performance. Topics include the role of the person, such as biology and personality; the role of the organization, such as workplace climate and work roles; and different types of individual and organizational stress management interventions that contribute to individuals' health and well-being. Prerequisite: This course is open only to the following majors: Applied Psychology or Certificate in Professional Counseling Studies. Other majors may take this course with departmental permission only.

    APPL 610 PSYCHOPATHOLOGY AND DIAGNOSIS (3)

    Problems in the epidemiology, diagnosis and treatment of behavior disorders. Major attention is given to changing applied and theoretical perspectives in the light of contemporary research methodologies and findings. Prerequisite:This course is open only to the following majors: Applied Psychology or Certificate in Professional Counseling Studies. Other majors may take this course with departmental permission only.

    APPL 612 HUMAN RELATIONS (3)

    Examination of human interactions in work settings that impact individual mental health and organizational health and productivity. Emphasis on preventing and intervening to reduce stress, frustration, conflict and violence, sexual harassment and other social problems in the workplace by applying research in emotional intelligence, personality, social perception, communication, persuasion and teamwork.Prerequisite:This course is open only to the following majors: Applied Psychology or Certificate in Professional Counseling Studies. Other majors may take this course with departmental permission only.

    APPL 613 HUMAN DEVELOPMENT (3)

    Survey of the biological, psychological and social changes that accompany the developmental process. Includes a study of the physical, intellectual, emotional and social development of the individual from conception to death, with special emphasis on adulthood. Prerequisite:This course is open only to the following majors: Applied Psychology or Certificate in Professional Counseling Studies. Other majors may take this course with departmental permission only.

    APPL 614 COMMUNITY PSYCHOLOGY (3)

    Provides an introduction to the central concepts, strategies, findings and values of community psychology to help students develop broader perspectives on individual and community functioning and well-being. Explores the interdependence of individuals and their communities and environments, with foci on social issues and policies, underserved and marginalized groups, social justice and social change, and prevention of social and mental health problems. Major emphasis is on research and interventions at the level of small groups, organizations, institutions and communities to reduce stress, enhance quality of life, prevent emotional and behavioral disorders, and empower individuals and their communities. Prerequisite:This course is open only to the following majors: Applied Psychology or Certificate in Professional Counseling Studies. Other majors may take this course with departmental permission only.

    APPL 615 COGNITIVE AND PSYCHOLOGICAL FOUNDATIONS (3)

    Covers material for three competency areas within the basic fields of psychology that are considered essential at the master’s level. Topics include biological bases of behavior, learning theories and cognition. Prerequisite:This course is open only to the following majors: Applied Psychology or Certificate in Professional Counseling Studies. Other majors may take this course with departmental permission only.

    APPL 616 ADVANCED TREATMENT TECHNIQUES (3)

    Acquaints students with specialized skills and treatments beyond the basic counseling techniques. Counseling techniques and treatments needed for specific populations and problem areas are discussed. Marital counseling, family counseling, sexual disorders and crisis intervention are some of the areas of focus. An overview of treatments of major mental disorders is presented. Prerequisites: APPL 605 and APPL 606 or equivalent

    APPL 617 PERSONALITY ASSESSMENT (3)

    Examines the rationale, psychometric properties and utility of some of the major personality assessments in use today. Focuses primarily on objective measures of personality, but projective measures are introduced. Emphasis is given to the professional and ethical responsibilities associated with the assessment process and to administration and interpretation procedures. Lab fee required. Prerequisites: APPL 610 and APPL 608 or satisfactory completion of undergraduate Tests and Measurements course. This course is open only to the following majors: Applied Psychology or Certificate in Professional Counseling Studies. Other majors may take this course with departmental permission only.

    APPL 618 INTELLECTUAL ASSESMENT (3)

    Examines the theoretical background, rationale and validity of the major tests of intellectual ability in use today. Emphasis is given to the professional and ethical responsibilities associated with the assessment process and to administration and interpretation procedures. Lab fee required. Prerequisites: APPL 610 and APPL 608 or satisfactory completion of undergraduate Tests and Measurements course. This course is open only to the following majors: Applied Psychology or Certificate in Professional Counseling Studies. Other majors may take this course with departmental permission only.

    APPL 619 PSYCHOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT (3)

    Examines the rationale and validity of the more predominant intelligence tests, projective measures, interest inventories and personality measures currently in use. Focus also includes professional and ethical responsibilities associated with the assessment process and provides familiarity with administration and interpretation procedures. Lab fee required. Prerequisites: APPL 610 and either APPL 608 or undergraduate Tests and Measurements course. This course is open only to the following majors: Applied Psychology or Certificate in Professional Counseling Studies. Other majors may take this course with departmental permission only.

    APPL 620 INTRODUCTION TO CLINICAL NEUROPSYCHOLOGY (3)

    Survey of basic clinical neuropsychology, focusing on the psychometric foundations of different diagnoses based on the clinical presentation of human brain dysfunction. Discusses cognitive, behavioral, emotional and social symptoms of the major neuropsychological disorders. Issues of assessment in impaired populations are addressed, including the provision of effective psychological services to the neuropsychologically impaired individual. Prerequisite:This course is open only to the following majors: Applied Psychology or Certificate in Professional Counseling Studies. Other majors may take this course with departmental permission only.

    APPL 621 SUBSTANCE ABUSE COUNSELING (3)

    Review of current literature regarding the prevalence, etiology, physiology, psychology, risk factors and social phenomena associated with substance (including alcohol) abuse and dependence. Emphasizes contemporary and traditional treatment methods employed by outpatient clinics and inpatient units. Prerequisite: APPL 606. This course is open only to the following majors: Applied Psychology or Certificate in Professional Counseling Studies. Other majors may take this course with departmental permission only.

    APPL 622 GROUP COUNSELING (3)

    Introduction to the theory and practice of group psychotherapy, including consideration of history and theory as well as practical considerations and clinical techniques. Ethical considerations for therapists who lead groups are discussed. An experiential component may be incorporated into the class periods. Lab fee required. Prerequisite: APPL 606. This course is open only to the following majors: Applied Psychology or Certificate in Professional Counseling Studies. Other majors may take this course with departmental permission only.

    APPL 623 CAREER COUNSELING (3)

    Introduces the primary theories that explain how individuals make career choices and the specific strategies the counselor can use to help the client make informed career choices. Students gain exposure to specific instruments designed to assist in career decisions. Lab fee may be required. Prerequisite: APPL 606. This course is open only to the following majors: Applied Psychology or Certificate in Professional Counseling Studies. Other majors may take this course with departmental permission only.

    APPL 624 PSYCHOLOGY AND THE LAW (3)

    Application of the fundamental principles of psychology to facets of the legal system, including an overview of the field as well as specialized topics such as competency, commitment, psychology of juries and the psychology of evidence. Emphasis on current newsworthy topics as well as on rapidly changing controversial issues and ethical considerations. Prerequisite:This course is open only to the following majors: Applied Psychology or Certificate in Professional Counseling Studies. Other majors may take this course with departmental permission only.

    APPL 625 MULTICULTURAL COUNSELING (3)

    Explores the impact of social and cultural norms on several population groups, with emphasis on aging, ethnicity, gender issues and psychosexual orientation. Cultural differences and their impact on the counseling relationship are examined. prerequisites: APPL 605 and APPL 606. This course is open only to the following majors: Applied Psychology or Certificate in Professional Counseling Studies. Other majors may take this course with departmental permission only.

    APPL 626 FAMILY THERAPY (3)

    Presents an overview of various family therapy theories and techniques, including systems theory. An integration of these techniques into the therapy process with couples and families is explored. Special attention is given to specific issues such as the impact of gender and ethnicity on a family therapeutic intervention. Sexual issues in a marriage/family context are examined. prerequisite: APPL 606. This course is open only to the following majors: Applied Psychology or Certificate in Professional Counseling Studies. Other majors may take this course with departmental permission only.

    APPL 627 CHILD AND ADOLESCENT THERAPY (3)

    Provides an understanding of the psychological disorders of childhood and adolescence. Covers the assessment, diagnosis and treatment of a broad range of disorders that typically arise in childhood or adolescence and examines the factors that contribute to their development. prerequisite: APPL 606. This course is open only to the following majors: Applied Psychology or Certificate in Professional Counseling Studies. Other majors may take this course with departmental permission only.

    APPL 628 COLLEGE COUNSELING (3)

    Provides an understanding of the issues and psychological problems of college students and how those issues and problems are treated in the college setting. Covers the assessment and treatment of disorders that characterize young adulthood, the core knowledge and skills of college counselors and an orientation to college and university counseling centers. prerequisites: APPL 602, APPL 606 and APPL 610. This course is open only to the following majors: Applied Psychology or Certificate in Professional Counseling Studies. Other majors may take this course with departmental permission only.

    APPL 629 SPECIAL TOPIC: TOPICS IN COUNSELING (3)

    Theoretical assumptions, techniques and effectiveness of interventions associated with behavioral and psychological problems of the aged, alcoholics, sexual deviants, criminal offenders and/or problems encountered in marriage and family situations. Specific topic may vary from semester to semester. May be repeated for credit as course topic changes. Lab fee may be required. prerequisites: to be determined by instructor Prerequisite:This course is open only to the following majors: Applied Psychology or Certificate in Professional Counseling Studies. Other majors may take this course with departmental permission only.

    APPL 631 INTERMEDIATE STATISTICS FOR BEHAVIORAL SCIENCE (3)

    The logic of hypothesis testing and assumptions underlying its use are the framework for studying analysis of variance and covariance and multiple regression. These tools are learned in the context of application to psychological research. Students learn to complete statistical analyses using a microcomputer statistical package and to interpret the results. Prerequisite:This course is open only to the following majors: Applied Psychology or Certificate in Professional Counseling Studies. Other majors may take this course with departmental permission only.

    APPL 632 RESEARCH METHODS FOR APPLIED PSYCHOLOGY (3)

    Builds on the fundamentals of research design and on knowledge of basic statistical techniques to provide a broad overview of the major research methods of applied psychological research. Students learn to frame inquiries and problems as research questions. The relative merits and drawbacks of the major research methods are explored. Students develop a research proposal to investigate an applied research question. Prerequisite: APPL 631. This course is open only to the following majors: Applied Psychology or Certificate in Professional Counseling Studies. Other majors may take this course with departmental permission only

    APPL 633 RESEARCH AND EVALUATION (3)

    Surveys methods used to investigate questions and acquire knowledge in counseling and psychology and provides students with skills necessary to critically evaluate counseling and clinical research literature. Topics include principles and techniques of qualitative and quantitative models, needs assessment, program evaluation, ethical and multicultural considerations in the research process and the role of the mental health counselor as a knowledgeable research customer. Prerequisite:This course is open only to the following majors: Applied Psychology or Certificate in Professional Counseling Studies. Other majors may take this course with departmental permission only.

    APPL 635 PROGRAM EVALUATION (3)

    Study of the theories, constructs and analytical skills needed to develop, implement and evaluate organizational programs and policies. Emphasis is on the research methods used to measure and track programs and their outcomes over time. prerequisites: APPL 631 and 632 or permission of program director. Applied Psychology or Certificate in Professional Counseling Studies.

    APPL 639 SPECIAL TOPICS: APPLIED STATISTICS (3)

    Study of one major statistical topic, such as multivariate statistics, structural equation modeling, meta-analysis, analysis of ordinal and categorical variables or nonparametric statistical techniques. Offered when student demand is sufficient and matches instructor interests. Topic may vary from semester to semester. May be repeated for credit as course topic changes. Prerequisites: APPL 631, APPL 632 and permission of instructor. Applied Psychology or Certificate in Professional Counseling Studies.

    APPL 641 ORGANIZATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY (3)

    Studies how principal theories and empirical findings from research in organizational psychology are used to improve employee performance and satisfaction. Emphasizes the interactive effects of situational and individual difference variables as they influence organizational behavior. Overview includes motivation, leadership, employee morale, group dynamics and interpersonal communication. Students apply theoretical and empirical findings to solutions of work-related problems in case studies. Lab fee may be required. Prerequisite:This course is open only to the following majors: Applied Psychology or Certificate in Professional Counseling Studies. Other majors may take this course with departmental permission only.

    APPL 642 MOTIVATION, SATISFACTION AND LEADERSHIP (3)

    Critical and in-depth examination of the research evidence for theories of leadership and job satisfaction. Using motivation as a central concept, students gain an understanding of how group dynamics and personal, environmental and cultural factors influence organizational behaviors. Students work in teams to solve performance-related problems presented in case studies. Lab fee may be required. Prerequisite: APPL 641 or approval of program director. This course is open only to the following majors: Applied Psychology or Certificate in Professional Counseling Studies. Other majors may take this course with departmental permission only.

    APPL 643 ADVANCED SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY (3)

    Survey of the theoretical positions, research methodology and current findings seeking to explain how interpersonal interactions affect individual and group behavior. Consideration is given to such constructs as attitudes, attributions and cooperation. Prerequisite:This course is open only to the following majors: Applied Psychology or Certificate in Professional Counseling Studies. Other majors may take this course with departmental permission only.

    APPL 644 PERSONNEL PSYCHOLOGY (3)

    Overview of the area of personnel psychology. Topics include job analysis, personnel selection and placement, training and development and performance appraisal. Special attention to measurement procedures involved in personnel selection and performance appraisal. Equal employment opportunity laws and their effect on personnel practices are discussed. Lab fee may be required. Prerequisite:This course is open only to the following majors: Applied Psychology or Certificate in Professional Counseling Studies. Other majors may take this course with departmental permission only.

    APPL 645 PERSONNEL ASSESSMENT (3)

    Application of the technical material learned in Personnel Psychology related to assessment techniques used to select, promote and evaluate personnel. Hands-on experience with these methods, including development of the most common ones. Assessment techniques discussed may include ability tests, personality and honesty tests, drug testing, work samples, interviews, training and evaluation forms and performance appraisals. Students go through the process of developing surveys for attitude assessment. Lab fee required. Prerequisite: APPL 644 or permission of instructor. This course is open only to the following majors: Applied Psychology or Certificate in Professional Counseling Studies. Other majors may take this course with departmental permission only.

    APPL 646 EMPLOYMENT LAW IN HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT (3)

    Review and analysis of federal laws and their application to human resource management (including employee selection, promotion, performance appraisals, discipline, termination, compensation, benefits and safety). Covers EEO, Affirmative Action, Civil Rights Acts, Americans with Disabilities Act and other antidiscriminatory legislation, as well as FLSA and OSHA. Examines legal issues such as privacy, sexual harassment, drug testing and employees’ rights versus employers’ rights. Addresses strategies for creating policy and legal concerns in a context of organizational behavior and motivation theories. Prerequisite:This course is open only to the following majors: Applied Psychology or Certificate in Professional Counseling Studies. Other majors may take this course with departmental permission only.

    APPL 647 TRAINING AND ORGANIZATIONAL DEVELOPMENT (3)

    Theory, findings and methods relating to how an organization ensures that its employees are equipped to accomplish its mission. Students learn about techniques to assess and implement organizational change. Through hands-on activities, they learn to develop and implement programs such as skills training, team building and management development. Prerequisite:This course is open only to the following majors: Applied Psychology or Certificate in Professional Counseling Studies. Other majors may take this course with departmental permission only.

    APPL 648 EMPLOYEE SELECTION (3)

    Examines testing and decision theory, legality and societal issues involved in matching individual knowledge, skills, abilities and other characteristics with organizational needs. Discussions include employment interviews, cognitive abilities testing, integrity and substance abuse testing, personality measures, biographical data and other procedures. Lab fee may be required. prerequisite: APPL 644. This course is open only to the following majors: Applied Psychology or Certificate in Professional Counseling Studies. Other majors may take this course with departmental permission only.

    APPL 649 SPECIAL TOPICS: INDUSTRIAL/ORGANIZATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY (3)

    Studies a topic of industrial/organizational psychology of mutual interest to students and faculty that is not currently part of course offerings. Topic may vary. May be repeated for credit as course topic changes. Lab fee may be required. Prerequisite:This course is open only to the following majors: Applied Psychology or Certificate in Professional Counseling Studies. Other majors may take this course with departmental permission only.

    APPL 650 WORK GROUPS IN ORGANIZATIONS (3)

    Study of group dynamics in the context of organizations, focusing on the predominant psychological theories and research findings that explain the formation and development of work groups. Emphasis on learning how effective strategies and techniques can be used to enhance teamwork in organizations. Prerequisite:This course is open only to the following majors: Applied Psychology or Certificate in Professional Counseling Studies. Other majors may take this course with departmental permission only.

    APPL 651 JOB ANALYSIS (3)

    Survey of job analysis methodology and issues using experiential projects. Includes tools used in conducting a job analysis: data gathering techniques, legal and technical standards and the Occupational Information Network. Emphasis is on variation in approach dependent on subsequent application of the results. Prerequisite:This course is open only to the following majors: Applied Psychology or Certificate in Professional Counseling Studies. Other majors may take this course with departmental permission only.

    APPL 652 ORGANIZATIONAL THEORY AND DEVELOPMENT (3)

    Survey of organizational theory and techniques used in organizational development. Topics include organizational structure and communication, sources of power, organizational culture, Lewin’s Change Model, Action Research and Schein’s Process Change. Prerequisite:This course is open only to the following majors: Applied Psychology or Certificate in Professional Counseling Studies. Other majors may take this course with departmental permission only.

    APPL 653 CONSULTING SKILLS (3)

    Focuses on the essential skills and abilities needed for successful consulting to organizations. Topics include business development, project management, cost estimation and report writing. Emphasizes learning techniques used for successful group presentations and developing skills for effective oral and written communication. Prerequisite:This course is open only to the following majors: Applied Psychology or Certificate in Professional Counseling Studies. Other majors may take this course with departmental permission only.

    APPL 654 SURVEY DEVELOPMENT AND IMPLEMENTATION (3)

    How to plan, design and implement surveys to assess organizational characteristics. Emphasizes how to collect and analyze survey data and present findings to the organization. Prerequisite:This course is open only to the following majors: Applied Psychology or Certificate in Professional Counseling Studies. Other majors may take this course with departmental permission only.

    APPL 655 PRACTICAL APPLICATIONS IN I/O PSYCHOLOGY (3)

    An opportunity to practice real-world application of the competencies acquired in the degree program. Students propose solutions to simulated or actual challenges faced by organizations and demonstrate their ability to integrate and apply broad knowledge of personnel and organizational psychology. Prerequisites: APPL 632, 642, 645 and 651. This course is open only to the following majors: Applied Psychology or Certificate in Professional Counseling Studies. Other majors may take this course with departmental permission only.

    APPL 657 PERSONALITY AT WORK (3)

    A study of the role that personality plays in an organizational setting. Examines the construct of personality as it relates to job performance and to interpersonal relations at work. Focuses primarily on recent theory, research and findings on the effectiveness of personality in selection with an emphasis on response distortion issues. Students complete several self-report inventories to gain a personal view of how someone with his or her profile would be expected to behave in various work environments. Prerequisite:This course is open only to the following majors: Applied Psychology or Certificate in Professional Counseling Studies. Other majors may take this course with departmental permission only.

    APPL 658 CHANGE MANAGEMENT (3)

    Theory, findings and methods relating to how organizations manage and mismanage change. Students learn about techniques to assess and implement organizational change. Through hands-on activities, they learn to develop and implement change management programs, including skills training and team building. Prerequisite:This course is open only to the following majors: Applied Psychology or Certificate in Professional Counseling Studies. Other majors may take this course with departmental permission only.

    APPL 659 CROSS-CULTURAL ORGANIZATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY (3)

    Examines topics in organizational psychology from a cross-cultural lens, focusing on portability of Western-based theories and practices to other cultures. Topics include cultural values, methodological equivalences, intercultural training, group processes, organizational justice, work-family issues, leadership, negotiations, acculturation and expatriation/repatriation. Prerequisite: APPL 641 or permission from instructor. This course is open only to the following majors: Applied Psychology or Certificate in Professional Counseling Studies. Other majors may take this course with departmental permission only

    APPL 661 DEATH,DYING, LOSS AND GRIEF (3)

    Models of adjustment to loss and their application to counseling individuals and groups who have experienced significant loss through death, illness and injury, divorce and major life transitions. Emphasis on issues related to death and dying (including social, psychological and cultural factors that influence grieving). Also explores significant loss areas to which grief intervention perspectives and techniques can be applied. Prerequisite:This course is open only to the following majors: Applied Psychology or Certificate in Professional Counseling Studies. Other majors may take this course with departmental permission only.

    APPL 662 TREATMENT OF TRAUMA (3)

    Provides students with knowledge and exposure to the current approaches to treatment of trauma used by clinicians. This course is designed to meet the requirements of the Maryland Board of Professional Counselors and Therapists for a course in psychotherapy and treatment of mental disorders. Lab fee may be required. prerequisites: APPL 605, APPL 606 and APPL 610 or their equivalents. This course is open only to the following majors: Applied Psychology or Certificate in Professional Counseling Studies. Other majors may take this course with departmental permission only

    APPL 663 TREATMENT OF DEPRESSIVE DISORDERS (3)

    Provides students with knowledge and skills in current evidence-based approaches to treatment of depressive disorders and of more complex disorders that often present as depression, such as borderline personality disorder. Cognitive and cognitive behavioral treatments are emphasized, though other theoretical approaches are noted. The class is designed for advanced graduate students in counseling and meets the Maryland state LCPC licensure requirement for a course in psychotherapy and treatment of mental disorders. Lab fee may be required. prerequisites: APPL 605, APPL 606 and APPL 610 or their equivalents. This course is open only to the following majors: Applied Psychology or Certificate in Professional Counseling Studies. Other majors may take this course with departmental permission only.

    APPL 664 GEROPSYCHOLOGY: PSYCHOSOCIAL FACTORS (3)

    Survey of the empirical data and theoretical formulations relating to the psychosocial concomitants of aging. Consideration of the interactional effects of individual, familial, social and cultural variables as they influence successful adaptation to later life. Prerequisite:This course is open only to the following majors: Applied Psychology or Certificate in Professional Counseling Studies. Other majors may take this course with departmental permission only.

    APPL 665 CLINICAL SUPERVISION (3)

    Advanced counseling course provides didactic preparation in clinical supervision knowledge and skills. Emphasizes ethics, supervisory relationship dynamics, models of supervision, modes of evaluation, supervision research and tools to conduct effective clinical supervision with counselor trainees. Course is approved by the Maryland Board of Professional Counselors and Therapists as meeting the education requirement for those seeking LCPC board-approved supervisor status. Lab fee. prerequisite: two semesters of APPL 703 or APPL 708 and permission of the instructor.

    APPL 666 TREATMENT OF ANXIETY DISORDERS (3)

    Provides students with a theoretical and empirical understanding of the development, maintenance and current evidence-based treatment of anxiety and related disorders, including cultural and social justice considerations. Behavioral and cognitive-behavioral treatments are emphasized, although other theoretical approaches are discussed as well. The course is designed for advanced graduate counseling psychology students, and meets the State of Maryland LCPC licensure requirement for a course in psychotherapy and treatment of mental disorders. Prerequisites: APPL 605, 606, and 610 or their equivalents.

    APPL 700 SPECIAL TOPICS: APPLIED PSYCHOLOGY (3)

    Readings and discussions of topics in applied psychology. Topic may vary. May be repeated for credit as course topic changes. Lab fee may be required. prerequisites: determined by instructor. Prerequisite:This course is open only to the following majors: Applied Psychology or Certificate in Professional Counseling Studies. Other majors may take this course with departmental permission only.

    APPL 701 SEMINAR IN APPLIED PSYCHOLOGY (3)

    Readings and discussions of research studies and theoretical papers in areas of special interest to seminar participants. prerequisite: completion of 15 hours of Applied Psychology core courses : This course is open only to the following majors: Applied Psychology or Certificate in Professional Counseling Studies. Other majors may take this course with departmental permission only

    APPL 702 FIELD EXPERIENCE (1 - 3)

    Supervised prior-to-practicum experience at a setting that supports preparation for a career in counseling or industrial/organizational psychology. Not a clinical experience. To earn 1 credit, a student spends approximately 60 hours at the site and provides a journal of the experience for the supervising faculty member. The requirements are agreed to in writing prior to registration by the student, supervising faculty member and on-site supervisor. A maximum of 3 credits may be applied to the degree. Course is NOT eligible for a continuing studies grade and does NOT count as part of the 60 credits required to qualify for certification by the State Board of Professional Counselors. Pass/fail grading. prerequisite: prior approval (See above.) Prerequisite:This course is open only to the following majors: Applied Psychology or Certificate in Professional Counseling Studies. Other majors may take this course with departmental permission only.

    APPL 703 PRACTICUM IN COUNSELING PSYCHOLOGY (3)

    Experience in the application of behavioral change methods and skills in a clinical or counseling setting. The student 1) functions as a professional under the supervision and guidance of an on-site director, and 2) attends scheduled group supervision meetings on campus several times during the course of the semester. Students must complete arrangements for the experience with the practicum coordinator in the semester preceding enrollment. Lab fee may be required. A maximum of 6 credits may be applied toward the degree. Eligible for continuing studies grade. Prerequisites: permission of instructor prior to registration and APPL 602, 605, 606 and 610. This course is open only to the following majors: Applied Psychology or Certificate in Professional Counseling Studies. Other majors may take this course with departmental permission only.

    APPL 704 PRACTICUM IN RESEARCH (3)

    Supervised participation in experimental studies designed by either the student or an individual approved by the instructor. A maximum of 6 credits may be applied toward the degree. Eligible for continuing studies grade. prerequisites: APPL 631 and APPL 632 or equivalent and approval of instructor. This course is open only to the following majors: Applied Psychology or Certificate in Professional Counseling Studies. Other majors may take this course with departmental permission only.

    APPL 705 PRACTICUM IN ASSESSMENT (3)

    Supervised experience in the use of assessment procedures in situations relevant to student interest and vocational goals. Students spend the equivalent of one day per week at an approved training site. A maximum of 6 credits may be applied toward the degree. prerequisites: APPL 606 and APPL 619 or APPL 645 or other appropriate coursework in assessment and approval of instructor. Applied Psychology or Certificate in Professional Counseling Studies. Other majors may take this course with departmental permission only.

    APPL 706 PRACTICUM IN APPLIED PSYCHOLOGY (3)

    An opportunity to gain practical experience in the application of psychology at various work settings. The work and/or field research is designed and mutually agreed upon by the student, the practicum coordinator and the workplace supervisor. Includes regular on-campus meetings. Enrollment may be limited by availability of settings. Student must complete arrangements for the experience with the practicum coordinator in the semester preceding enrollment. A maximum of 6 credits may be applied to the degree. Eligible for continuing studies grade. prerequisites: permission of instructor (prior to registration) and coursework deemed pertinent to project by practicum coordinator. Prerequisite:This course is open only to the following majors: Applied Psychology or Certificate in Professional Counseling Studies. Other majors may take this course with departmental permission only.

    APPL 707 PRACTICUM IN INDUSTRIAL /ORGANIZATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY (1 - 4)

    Supervised participation in field research in applied job settings. Hands-on experience with I/O work assignments is performed and evaluated. The work and/or field research is designed by the student or senior personnel and should enhance a student’s vita/resume. Government, industry, public/community service or other settings may be generated by the instructor or the student. Setting and research/job duties must be proposed and agreed upon in writing by the student, the instructor and an authorized representative from the organization. To the extent that settings/positions must be generated by the instructor, enrollment is limited according to availability. A maximum of 6 credits may be applied toward the degree. Eligible for continuing studies grade. prerequisite: permission of instructor. Prerequisite:This course is open only to the following majors: Applied Psychology or Certificate in Professional Counseling Studies. Other majors may take this course with departmental permission only.

    APPL 708 INTERNSHIP IN COUNSELING (1 - 3)

    Builds upon APPL 703, Practicum in Counseling, allowing students to practice and integrate counseling skills in campus or community settings. Students accrue at least 100 hours of supervised clinical experience for each credit taken. Course meets professional counselor licensure requirements for field experience in counseling. prerequisites: APPL 703 and permission of program director. This course is open only to the following majors: Applied Psychology or Certificate in Professional Counseling Studies. Other majors may take this course with departmental permission only.

    APPL 779 DIRECTED STUDY IN APPLIED PSYCHOLOGY (1 - 3)

    The pursuit of independent work under the supervision of a faculty member. This work should relate to a topic not covered by the regular department offerings and may provide a basis for entrance into courses with special prerequisites. The student writes a proposal that is approved by the supervising faculty member and the graduate program director prior to registration. Prerequistes: completion of required core and approval prior to registration. Pass/fail grading. Eligible for continuing studies (CS) grade. Prerequisite:This course is open only to the following majors: Applied Psychology or Certificate in Professional Counseling Studies. Other majors may take this course with departmental permission only.

    APPL 789 RESEARCH PROPOSAL DEVELOPMENT (3)

    Independent study in which the student develops a proposal for research founded in the literature and practice of applied psychology. The student must have the requisite skills for bringing the proposal to completion. The end product of the course is a research proposal that may be presented to the division as a thesis proposal. Course is NOT eligible for continuing studies grade. Pass/fail grading. Prerequisite:This course is open only to the following majors: Applied Psychology or Certificate in Professional Counseling Studies. Other majors may take this course with departmental permission only.

    APPL 798 CONTINUOUS ENROLLMENT (1)

    Provides continuing faculty direction, academic support services and enrollment services for students who have completed all course requirements for the degree but have not completed a thesis or final project. Students continue the independent work leading to finishing the thesis or final project that is significantly under way. Course may be repeated for credit as needed. Eligible for continuing studies (CS) grade; otherwise grading is pass/fail. prerePrerequisite:This course is open only to the following majors: Applied Psychology or Certificate in Professional Counseling Studies. Other majors may take this course with departmental permission only.quisite: completion of all course requirements for degree program.

    APPL 799 THESIS IN APPLIED PSYCHOLOGY (3 - 6)

    An independent and original research effort, supervised closely by full-time faculty. It should be founded in the literature of applied psychology. The student is expected to demonstrate an ability to formulate research questions as testable hypotheses, to analyze data using appropriate research methods and design and statistical tools, and to present the entire work in a well-written document using APA style. The number of credits is determined when the proposal is approved. Eligible for continuing studies (CS) grade; otherwise grading is pass/fail. Prerequisite:This course is open only to the following majors: Applied Psychology or Certificate in Professional Counseling Studies. Other majors may take this course with departmental permission only.

  • COSC: Computer Science

    COSC 789 SPECIAL TOPICS IN COMPUTER SCIENCE (3)

    One or more specific topics in computer science or its applications may be studied by advanced students. Topics arise from mutual interests of faculty and students. May be repeated if topic differs. Lab fee required.

    COSC 790 INDEPENDENT STUDY (1 - 3)

    Problem-solving project, programming project and/or independent research in some aspect of computer science. The topic and number of credits vary with individual student interest and the extent of study. Prior to registration, students submit a written proposal with the consent and advice of a full-time faculty member, who approves it and agrees to supervise the study. Lab fee required.

  • CWPA: Creative Write/Publishing Arts

    CWPA 610 INTRODUCTION TO PUBLICATIONS SOFTWARE (3)

    An introduction to graphics and visual communication principles. This course covers the manipulation of graphic form to convey meaning, strategies for idea generation and development of unique concepts, and the designer's role as visual storyteller. Students explore fundamental design principles through digital visual communication projects.

    CWPA 620 CREATIVITY: WAYS OF SEEING (3)

    Exploration of the creative process, relationships between written and visual expression, sources of inspiration and forms of publishing. Through a series of weekly projects, design experiments and innovative models, students develop new ways of seeing and deepen their understanding of creative expression. Team-taught by a creative writer and a book artist or graphic designer, the course offers a collaborative setting that acknowledges important connections between form and function, materials and subject, and tradition and innovation. Lab fee required.

    CWPA 622 FICTION WORKSHOP (3)

    Exploration of the uses and values of narrative. Combines practice in writing narratives with analysis of the nature and methods of narrative art.

    CWPA 623 POETRY WORKSHOP (3)

    An opportunity to write poetry in a workshop setting. Students write a new poem every week and experiment with a variety of styles, from traditional forms to free verse and spoken word. Students read and study poems by contemporary authors and critique one another's work in order to develop their sense of craft.

    CWPA 626 LITERARY NONFICTION WORKSHOP (3)

    Experimentation in writing various kinds of nonfiction, such as personal essays, travel essays, profiles, culture criticism, memoirs and essay reviews. Focus is on the use of literary techniques within the context of the form’s traditions and contemporary innovations.

    CWPA 627 MEMOIR WORKSHOP (3)

    An opportunity to write a memoir. Students read and study memoirs by contemporary authors to become more familiar with the many possibilities available to writers working in this form. Focus is on issues relevant to the writing of memoir, including craft and techniques, memory and truth-telling, and interior and exterior significance.

    CWPA 628 SCREENWRITING (3)

    Students analyze and write entertainment-oriented scripts for television and film. Emphasizes plot and character development, dialogue, writing for the eye and the ear and following industry script and program conventions.

    CWPA 651 TYPE AND DESIGN FOR CREATIVE WRITERS (3)

    Exploration of the fundamentals of typographic form and function with specific application to literary publishing. The course examines type design and family classification of type and their characteristics as well as organization of visual space and other basic design principles. Lab fee required. prerequisite: knowledge of Adobe lnDesign and Photoshop

    CWPA 720 ADVANCED WRITING WORKSHOP (3)

    Encourages the thoughtful analysis of craft and language in published works to help students develop as writers. Students see their manuscripts through the drafting process, from idea to revision. Through in-person and online workshops, students provide critical feedback on the fiction, poetry and creative nonfiction of their peers. Student establish a set of creative goals for themselves, propose a research project based on those goals, and present the results of their project to their classmates.

    CWPA 752 CREATIVE WRITING: SPECIAL TOPICS (3)

    Intensive exploration of topics in creative writing of special interest to faculty and students. Content varies according to specific interests and trends in creative writing. Possible topics include narrative poetry, gothic or romance novels and stories, detective and mystery fiction and marketing small press books. Specific topic is listed in the schedule of classes. Course may be repeated for credit when topic changes. Lab fee may be required.

    CWPA 753 PUBLISHING ARTS: SPECIAL TOPICS (3) (3)

    Intensive exploration of topics in print publishing, electronic publishing and book arts of special interest to faculty and students. Content varies according to specific interests and trends in publishing arts. Specific topic is listed in the schedule of classes. Course may be repeated for credit when topic changes. Lab fee may be required.

    CWPA 761 TEACHING WRITING (3)

    This course will teach students how to teach writing. It will focus on pedagogical strategies, course planning, and classroom management, and will introduce students to the theory and scholarly debates surrounding these topics. The course will accomplish its goals through readings, discussion, and applied and experiential learning. Prerequisite: None.

    CWPA 775 INTERNSHIP (3)

    Direct experience working in the field of creative writing. Internship opportunities include working for presses, literary agencies, publishers and literary arts organizations, as well as teaching. Eligible for continuing studies grade. May be repeated for credit if the internship is different. Prerequisite: Permission of program director

    CWPA 778 INDEPENDENT STUDY IN PUBLISHING ARTS (1 - 3)

    Production project in an area related to the M.F.A. in Creative Writing & Publishing Arts program. Topics vary with individual student interest. Lab fee required. prerequisite: permission of program director

    CWPA 779 INDEPENDENT STUDY IN CREATIVE WRITING (1 - 3)

    Research or writing in an area related to the M.F.A. in Creative Writing & Publishing Arts program. Topics vary with individual student interest. prerequisite: permission of program director

    CWPA 780 BOOK ARTS (3)

    Hands-on course in which students produce a variety of small literary publications. They serve as editors and designers as well as writers. Also introduces students to book arts, teaching book structure, construction and binding. Lab fee required.

    CWPA 781 ELECTRONIC PUBLISHING (3)

    Exploration of ways for creative writers to write and publish on the Web. Students analyze electronic literary publications, write and produce their own literary Web publications and gain an understanding of the opportunities available to them in electronic publishing. Lab fee required.

    CWPA 782 CREATING THE JOURNAL (3)

    Exploration of processes involved in creating a print journal, from choosing manuscripts to designing and publishing. As a result of participating in the editing process, students gain insight into their own writing, develop their own aesthetic and see how editors make selections. Lab fee required.

    CWPA 783 PRINT PUBLISHING (3)

    How to place creative writing for publication. Topics range from writing a cover letter to finding agents to handling rejection. Students work independently, analyze current print and online publications and develop an extensive and annotated list of appropriate places for their work to appear. Before manuscripts are submitted for publication, they are critiqued by the class.

    CWPA 786 EXPERIMENTAL FORMS (3)

    Examination of selected works that challenge our conventional assumptions about language and form. Emphasis on new forms that re-imagine traditional genres of writing and blur the boundaries between poetry, fiction and nonfiction. Students explore possibilities for appropriating and subverting conventional uses of language as well as mixing and creating new forms in their own writing.

    CWPA 787 SEMINAR IN LITERATURE AND WRITING (3)

    Combining traditional scholarship and creative writing, the course begins with a close study of a seminal literary work or group of works, to be chosen by the instructor. Students explore the nature of these texts per se and how they relate to both current and past literature and to the students’ own work. A final written project integrates original research and the creative interpretation of the ideas developed from reading and discussion.

    CWPA 788 INTERNATIONAL WRITING WORKSHOP (3)

    Focuses on reading the work of writers from around the world, most of it in translation. At the same time, students will explore new subjects and approaches to their own writing. Prerequisite: None

    CWPA 796 MFA THESIS I (3)

    Opportunity to focus intensively on creative writing in a particular genre. Students may revise and edit previously written work as well as create new work, aimed at publication. In addition to expanding and refining their own work, students critique each other's work. A substantial essay focusing on another writer's work or on a topic related to their interests and concerns as writers is also required. prerequisite: two writing workshops in the same genre and permission of the program director

    CWPA 797 THESIS II: WRITING (3)

    Second semester of two-semester thesis sequence. Entering with a completed or nearly completed manuscript written while in the program, students revise and complete their manuscript and prepare it for publication. In addition, they act as peer advisers to one another and are responsible for providing in-depth critiques of each other's work. Prerequisite: All other required courses for the M.F.A. in Creative Writing & Publishing Arts except CWPA 795 seminar in Creative Writing & Publishing Arts, which is taken concurrently, and permission of the program director.

    CWPA 798 THESIS III: DESIGN (3)

    Capstone course for the M.F.A. in Creative Writing & Publishing Arts. Entering the course with a completed or nearly completed manuscript written while in the program, students design and produce a publication consisting of their own original work. In a seminar setting, they act as peer advisers to one another and are responsible for providing in-depth critiques of each other’s work. The course revisits and re-examines concepts introduced in earlier courses. prerequisite: all other required courses for the M.F.A. in Creative Writing & Publishing Arts and permission of the program director

  • CRJU: Criminal Justice

    CRJU 501 PROFESSIONAL SKILLS IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE (3)

    Focuses on professional skills that will prepare students for graduate-level coursework and for future employment. Includes navigating criminal justice databases, interpreting empirical research, writing in a technical style, creating an effective PowerPoint document and strengthening oral presentation skills. Relies on a combination of group and individual exercises in both traditional lecture format and hands-on workshops to address each skill set. Pass/fail grading; to earn a passing grade, students must earn a B or better in this course.

    CRJU 600 Ethical Issue in Criminal Justice (3)

    Examines ethical and moral values and professional responsibilities and decision-making as they pertain to the criminal justice system. Recognize characteristics of an ethical system and ethical frameworks for various criminal justice organizations. Explores ethical implications of discretionary power and various policy issues. Analyzes ethical dilemmas and ethical conduct versus misconduct.

    CRJU 601 CRIME AND POLICY DEVELOPMENT (3)

    Addresses the issue of how crime is measured in the United States and discusses why certain crimes capture the attention of lawmakers and the public more than do others. Examines why lawmakers have adopted certain responses to address crime and critically evaluates whether such strategies are effective in reducing crimes. Students research best practices within the field and are introduced to different analytical techniques to evaluate quantitative crime data. Prerequisites: None

    CRJU 602 RESEARCH TECHNIQUES IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE (3)

    Provides knowledge of and experience with the methods used in studying social science problems. Emphasis is on research, designs and instruments and policy implications. Critical and analytical skills are developed for use in future research and proposal writing. This course is a prerequisite for CRJU 603.

    CRJU 603 CRIMINAL JUSTICE STATISTICS (3)

    Introduces students to the relevance and importance of statistics in studying criminal justice problems. Explores different types of data, data-management techniques and different statistical methods to aid in the preparation of agency and formal research reports. Required for all criminal justice students.

    CRJU 605 GRADUATE INTERNSHIP (3)

    Students will work 120 hours in a selected agency, institution or office within the criminal justice field, and will complete classroom work that focuses on career development and management skills. Required of all students. ( Note: Students who are currently working in the criminal justice field may be waived from this course at the discretion of the program director. Students who are waived must then complete an extra elective.) Prerequisite: Permission of program director.

    CRJU 606 CONTEMPORARY CRIMINAL COURT ISSUES (3)

    In-depth analysis of selected current issues pertaining to criminal court systems. Focuses on the current research literature and considers the operational consequences of alternative responses to the issues discussed.

    CRJU 610 ADMINISTRATION OF JUSTICE (3)

    Analysis of the major conceptions of justice and the ways these conceptions affect the manner in which social and legal systems are constituted. Examines theoretical perspectives with a view to understanding the relationships between various institutions and the administration of justice. Presents a comparative and historical focus on local, national and international systems of justice.

    CRJU 611 CONTEMPORARY ISSUES IN CORRECTIONS (3)

    In-depth analysis of the contemporary structure of the correctional system in the United States. Evaluates the system's issues in managing and supervising a growing offender population. Explorers the latest research on best practice for institutional and community correctional programming.

    CRJU 615 INSIDE-OUT PRISION EXCHANGE PROGRAM (3)

    Inside-Out brings "outside" students college undergraduates and graduates. particularly those pursuing careers in criminal justice and related fields -together with "inside" students -incarcerated men and women -to study as peers behind prison walls. The semester-long course provides a transformative experience that allows the outside students to contextualize and rethink what they have learned in the classroom, gaining insights that will help them pursue the work ofcreating an effective, humane, restorative criminal justice system.

    CRJU 620 MANAGEMENT AND SUPERVISION IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE (3)

    Examines the foundational concepts of management and supervision as applied in criminal justice organizations. Explores organization and policy planning, budgeting, forecasting, human resources, and policy implementation. Emphasis is placed on issues relating to effective management and supervision in criminal justice. Topics covered include managing budgets and strategies on project management, supervising and managing personnel and staff development, setting clear performance goals, and building internal and external partnerships and community relationships to support the mission of an organization.

    CRJU 626 PROFESSIONAL COMMUNICATIIONS IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE (3)

    Examines strategies and techniques used to obtain information in a variety of situations, to differentiate between interview and interrogation, to interact with diverse populations, to communicate with the media and to analyze information for consideration as evidence. Explores how the use of appropriate communications techniques and procedures leads to effective leadership, management and supervision within the criminal justice system. prerequisite: none

    CRJU 631 CONTEMPORARY ISSUES IN POLICING (3)

    Examines the social and political contexts of policing in contemporary society and evaluates current issues law enforcement faces when dealing with crime control, prevention, and maintenance of order. Explores the latest research on the effect of police policies, programs and practices.

    CRJU 632 POLICING SPECIAL POPULATIONS (3)

    Examines the research literature related to the special populations and groups of people that the police organization is mandated to manage based on statutory law, operating policies and procedures, and tradition and custom. Helps students understand how and why police intervene in the way that they do with some subgroups within the broader population.

    CRJU 633 RACE/ETHNICITY AND GENDER ISSUES IN LAW ENFORCEMENT (3)

    Examines the research literature related to the impact of race/ethnicity and gender on the police organization. Examines the various ways that a suspect’s or victim’s race/ethnicity or gender creates problems and makes it difficult for the police organization to effectively meet the law enforcement needs of a particular community.

    CRJU 635 YOUTH PROBLEMS IN SOCIETY (3)

    Discusses the role of demographics, developmental issues, family, school, peers and individual roles in youth behavior. Analyzes the major studies and theoretical foundations of juvenile delinquency and identifies and analyzes the current solutions implemented at both system and community levels. Reviews best practices in the control and prevention of juvenile delinquency.

    CRJU 636 INFORMATION AND TECHNOLOGY IN CRIMINIAL JUSTICE (3)

    Explores how information is developed and processed into data informed decision making and policy. Analyze how to translate data information into knowledge. Presents a variety of criminal justice data information sources to provide an understanding of how data outcomes drive decision-making in the criminal justice system. Engage in more informed strategic and tactical planning and decision making using data systems, data management and data analysis techniques. prerequisite: none

    CRJU 640 MANAGING POLICE ORGANIZATIONS (3)

    Application of managerial and administrative practices to police agencies. Emphasis on executive processes, including planning, decision-making, implementation and evaluation, structuring discretion, providing leadership and dealing with corruption and other abuses. An examination of the role of the police administrator in the community and the governmental structure.

    CRJU 642 MANAGING CORRECTIONAL ORGANIZATIONS (3)

    Application of managerial and administrative practices to correctional agencies, focusing on the particular problems encountered in managing such agencies. Emphasis is on executive processes, including planning, decision-making, implementation and evaluation. Problems specific to secure facilities, probation, parole and community corrections are considered.

    CRJU 666 POLITICS, LEGISLATION AND THE MEDIA IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE (3)

    Examines the influence and process of politics on the criminal justice system, the legislative process and how legislation is enacted, and general policy-making procedures. Includes analysis of the evolution of a crime problem and how it transforms into law, policy and practice and how politics and the media influence perceptions and reactions to criminal behavior that may lead to successful legislative outcomes. Explores the design and implementation of future forecasting models, guided by law and policy, specific to the criminal justice process and offers a problem-oriented approach to effective lobbying and utilization of media resources in policy-making. prerequisite: none.

    CRJU 676 SYSTEMS AND APPLICATIONS IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE (3)

    Students diagnose and analyze real-world crime-related issues and problems in the criminal justice system. Examines decision-making techniques used in time-sensitive situations and crisis management. Offers a problem-oriented approach to effective leadership and management within the criminal justice system. prerequisite: none.

    CRJU 680 FOUNDATIONS & IMPACT OF TRAUMA (3)

    Provides the foundation for understanding trauma and post-traumatic stress disorder in adults and children; examines the impact of trauma as well as describing the short and long term effects of trauma; and explains how past trauma can lead to ongoing problem behaviors. Develops skills and increases awareness of the necessary core competencies in trauma-informed services and administration. Also, provides an understanding of the impact and manifestation of vicarious traumatization and compassion fatigue on professionals. prerequisite: none

    CRJU 682 TRAUMA INFORMED ORGANIZATIONS (3)

    Provides an understanding of how the impact of trauma can manifest behaviorally and may be elicited by normal interactions found within criminal justice system settings, and describes how to use trauma informed responses to reduce the intensity of difficult or dangerous situations. Explains how trauma informed criminal justice system responses can help to avoid re-traumatizing individuals, increase safety, and reduce future involvement in the system. Explains the benefits of capacity building among partners cross systems to link individuals to trauma-informed services and treatment as a means to increase an individual's ability to recover. prerequisite: none

    CRJU 684 RESPONDING TO TRAUMA (3)

    Provides an understanding of trauma symptoms and the needs of trauma survivors; describes approaches for engaging individuals with histories of trauma; describes client·centered communication and interviewing skills for working with trauma; examines tools to identify and screen for trauma and mental health disorders to facilitate early intervention and treatment referrals. Increases knowledge of trauma~specific services, community resources, and self·care methods for reducing symptoms of vicarious trauma and burn-out. prerequisite: none

    CRJU 685 ISSUES IN FORSENICS INVESTIGATION (3)

    Explores investigative theory and issues of forensic investigations. Examines the use of forensic science to various statutory offenses, solving crimes, and legal proceedings. Presents current issues in forensic investigations and analyzes its impact on the processing of criminal law and administration of justice. Chain of command in evidence preservation and the validity of forensic evidence in criminal proceedings are emphasized throughout the course. prerequisites: none

    CRJU 686 TRAUMA INTERVENTIONS AND BEST PRACTICES (3)

    Examines evidence-based trauma interventions and emerging areas of best practices; describes the different models and techniques currently used with different populations and discusses their effectiveness. Examines how culture and ethnicity influence the experience and effects the treatment of trauma. prerequisite: none

    CRJU 702 CONTEMPORARY ISSUES FOR VICTIMS OF CRIME (3)

    Analysis of crime and social reaction from the point of view of the offended. Focuses on the relatively recent emphasis on how crime creates problems for those victimized by criminals and analysis of whole populations victimized by persons known to them. Includes an analysis of the idea of restitution.

    CRJU 703 SEMINAR IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE (3)

    Seminar devoted to a particular topic related to research, theory and/or applications in criminal justice. Sample topics include qualitative research in criminal justice, community crime prevention and juvenile justice history. May be repeated for credit when the topic changes. no prerequisite unless listed in schedule of classes

    CRJU 704 BEST PRACTICES IN VICTIM SERVICES (3)

    Introduces the emerging field of victim services in context with the underlying legal structure of crime victims' rights. The impact of the legal structure of crime victims' rights has influenced both formal and informal responses to crime victims needs. A thorough analysis of the system of services, both with the criminal justice system and through other allied professions, is examined. Best practices in victim assistance programs-- from law enforcement through the courts and corrections systems to financial remedies, community- based advocacy, and treatment and support services- are also examined. Prerequisite: None

    CRJU 705 A DIALOGUE WITH A VICTIM (3)

    Provides a critical and in-depth review of some of the communication barriers criminal justice personnel encounter when interacting with victims and witnesses in the course of an investigation. Critically examines competing narratives (e.g., individual, professional, personal, cultural) often present when interviewing a victim/witness and how these narratives can impede communication flow and the investigative process. Explore strategies to reduce these obstacles. Prerequisite: None.

    CRJU 707 COMMUNITY CORRECTIONS (3)

    Analysis of the types, procedures, problems, theories and evaluation of supervision of adults and juveniles in the various forms of community-based corrections. Students will be responsible for understanding classic and contemporary research on this subject matter.

    CRJU 708 LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE (3)

    Integrates evolving perspectives in leadership, principles of criminal justice administration, and relevant technological innovations and applications. Studies the influence of leadership as it relates to criminal justice organizational culture, governing bodies, strategic planning, succession planning, diversity and globalization. Prerequisite: None.

    CRJU 710 ADVANCED CRIMINOLOGY: THEORY TO PRACTICE (3)

    Discusses classical and contemporary theories of criminal behavior and investigates how political, economic and social factors can cause paradigmatic shifts in how theory is both developed and applied in the real world. Students explore how theories are evaluated empirically and learn to develop and critique contemporary crime prevention and control policies by applying different theoretical models.

    CRJU 713 SEMINAR IN JUDICIAL ADMINISTRATION (3)

    Evaluation of management problems relating to courts and the role of court functions and personnel.

    CRJU 715 STUDIES/READING IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE (1 - 3)

    Designed to give the graduate student academic flexibility. Eligible for continuing studies grades. prerequisite: permission of program director

    CRJU 722 STRATEGIC AND CRISIS MANAGEMENT IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE ORGANIZATIONS (3)

    Examines strategic and crisis management methodologies and tactics employed in criminal justice organizations. Provides foundational skills and financial literacy for managing resources and personnel while managing competing priorities. Identifies conflict management and resolution strategies in justice leadership. Explores the cultural, ethical, social and political effects on organizational management. Discusses the nature and impact of external forces on criminal justice management and leadership and an understanding of the need for organizational change. Prerequisites: none

    CRJU 725 FUNDAMENTALS OF GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SCIENCE AND SYSTEMS (3)

    Provides students with foundational knowledge in both geographic information science and Systems that will allow them to better understand and think critically about the role of "place and space" and to engage in the routine use of basic GIS technology in their studies and workplace. Students will learn to use ESRl's ArcGIS to create maps and analyze geo-data and relationships, and to present their results to others. prerequisites: none.

    CRJU 730 CONTEMPORARY ISSUES IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE (3)

    Examines contemporary issues pertaining to the criminal justice system. Explores the newest research and its impact on laws, policy, and practices. Evaluates the current issues in leading and managing the various complex agencies within the criminal justice system. Prerequisites: none

    CRJU 742 MANAGING CORREC ORG (3)

    No course description available.

    CRJU 777 CAPSTONE IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE (3)

    Capstone course offers students an opportunity to demonstrate their mastery of knowledge in the fields of criminology and criminal justice, gained while working toward completion of the graduate degree. Course is designed to be an integrative experience in which students combine their knowledge of criminological theory and of justice policy with practical skills to develop a comprehensive approach to planned change. Prerequisite: CRJU 601, 602, 603, 610, 708 and 710.

    CRJU 798 CONTINUOUS ENROLLMENT (1)

    Provides continuing faculty direction, academic support services and enrollment services for students who have completed all course requirements for the degree but have not completed a thesis or final project. Students continue the independent work leading to finishing the thesis or final project that is significantly under way. Course may be repeated for credit as needed. Eligible for continuing studies (CS) grade; otherwise grading is pass/fail. prerequisite: completion of all course requirements for degree program

    CRJU 799 THESIS (3 - 6)

    Supervised preparation of an original work displaying research and writing skills. 6 hours, plus defense. Students may register for 3 hours in each of two semesters or 6 hours in one semester. Eligible for continuing studies (CS) grade; otherwise grading is pass/fail. prerequisite: permission of program director

  • DESN: Design

    DESN 615 INTEGRATED DESIGN STUDIO I: PRINCIPLES (3)

    An intensive studio experience addressing visual perception and the principles of design through readings on visual theory. Using primary texts, students explore design principles from key historic, psychological, abstract and artistic points of view. Students complete a major project in their area of specialization. Lab fee required.

    DESN 616 INTEGRATED DESIGN STUDIO ii: TYPOGRAPHY (3)

    An intensive, multilayered studio experience focused on the study of typography at the micro level. Students discuss both classical and contemporary typographic principles based on class and individual reading and research. Students render a typeface design over the course of the semester. Lab fee required. prerequisite: PBDS 645 or equivalent

    DESN 617 CREATIVE CONCEPTS (3)

    Exploration of creative processes and strategies for generating effective visual and verbal ideas. Analysis of creative solutions in various publications supplements practice in applying problem-solving techniques. Lab fee may be required.

    DESN 723 THEORY OF VISUAL COMMUNICATION (3)

    Examines the fundamental characteristics that differentiate visual images from other modes of communication and considers ways that visual elements convey meaning in isolation and in combination. Students study real-world cases to better understand how theoretical concepts and constructs are used to solve communication problems.

    DESN 791 PRACTICUM IN INTEGRATED DESIGN (3)

    Students apply skills and knowledge from coursework to high-level internships. Students interested in careers as professional designers work in design firms and related organizations; students interested in college teaching careers teach classes under faculty supervision. Eligible for continuing studies (CS) grade. prerequisites: permission of program director and all M.F.A. in Integrated Design coursework except DESN 793 and DESN 797

    DESN 793 PROSEMINAR IN INTEGRATED DESIGN (3)

    Provides an overview of proposal development and design research in integrated design anchored in the literature and practice of the field. Students develop the requisite skills for bringing the proposal to completion. The course culminates in a research proposal that may be presented to the division as a thesis proposal. prerequisites: M.F.A. candidacy and permission of program director

    DESN 797 INTEGRATED DESIGN THESIS (6)

    Independent and original design project supervised by one or more faculty members. Product reflects an understanding of graphic design principles and demonstrates excellence in conceptualizing and executing design solutions to communication problems. Finished work is reviewed by a faculty committee. Pass/fail grading. Eligible for continuing studies (CS) grade. Lab fee required. prerequisites: all other M.F.A. in Integrated Design coursework and program director’s approval of thesis topic prior to registration

    DESN 798 CONTINUOUS ENROLLMENT (1)

    Provides continuing faculty direction, academic support services and enrollment services for students who have completed all course requirements for the degree but have not completed a thesis or final project. Students continue the independent work leading to finishing the thesis or final project that is significantly under way. Course may be repeated for credit as needed. Eligible for continuing studies (CS) grade; otherwise grading is pass/fail. Lab fee required. Prerequisite: Completion of all course requirements and candidacy for the degree program.

  • ECON: Economics

    ECON 505 MICRO ECONOMICS (1.50)

    Covers comparative advantage, supply and demand, elasticity, opportunity cost, competition and monopoly, and externalities. Emphasizes understanding concepts that are useful in making effective choices in a variety of economic and managerial situations. prerequisite: graduate standing

    ECON 506 MACRO ECONOMICS (1.50)

    Covers economic growth, monetary and fiscal policy, inflation and unemployment. Emphasizes understanding concepts, such as Federal Reserve policy, that are useful for managerial decision-making. prerequisite: graduate standing

    ECON 605 BUSINESS AND PUBLIC POLICY IN A GLOBAL ECONOMY (1.50)

    This course uses an economic framework to analyze and evaluate public policy issues that may affect businesses. Ethical and managerial implications are integrated. Applications of the framework include globalization, environmental, and health care issues.

    ECON 650 BUSINESS ECONOMICS (3)

    Applies macro-, micro- and global economic theory, drawing on analytical techniques and other business areas, to understand the financial environment of the firm. Based on an understanding of market behavior, the course examines global competitiveness, regulation and pricing. Attention then turns toward the impact of global and macroeconomic forces acting on organizations. Students will be expected to demonstrate analytical skills in solving real-world problems, with an emphasis on the financial conduct and structure of the firm. prerequisites: ECON 505,ECON 506 and OPRE 505, OPRE 506

    ECON 720 INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS AND FINANCE (3)

    Covers the framework of international economics and finance. Topics covered include classical trade theory, balance of payment, models of open economy, export and import economic policies and trade performance, foreign exchange markets, currency options and futures markets, international money markets and capital markets. Specific application will be made to European, Asian and Latin American markets. prerequisite: ECON 505 and ECON 506

    ECON 765 THE HEALTH SERVICES SYSTEMS (3)

    An overview of the U.S. health-care system, including health care as a product and the role of all stakeholders: patients, physicians, staff, hospitals, insurers, employers and the government. Topics include the impact of cost containment and competition on management within hospitals and on physician-hospital relations; alternate delivery systems (HMOs, PPOs); multiunit systems; what makes health care different from standard economic markets; health-care marketing; health insurance, including (a) uninsured/uncompensated care and (b) poorly informed but heavily insured customers; a larger not-for-profit sector and heavy government involvement; and legal aspects of health care, including social, moral and ethical issues. prerequisite: ECON 505 and ECON 506

    ECON 797 SPECIAL TOPICS IN ECONOMIC MANAGEMENT (3)

    Specialized topics in economics allowing flexibility for both the changing developments in business and the educational needs of students. Topic areas may include econometrics, entrepreneurship or organizational architecture. Exact listing of topics and prerequisites may be listed in schedule of classes. prerequisite: ECON 504 or area approval

    ECON 799 INDIVIDUAL RESEARCH (1 - 3)

    Individual research in an area of interest to the student. The expectation is that work equivalent to a regular graduate course will be completed. Formal paper(s) will be written under the supervision of a full-time faculty member. prerequisites: approval of both an economics faculty member and the department chair

  • ENTR: Entrepreneurship

    ENTR 605 CREATIVITY AND THE ENTREPRENEURIAL MINDSET (1.50)

    Focuses on personal and organizational creativity and enables students to recognize and develop creative abilities in organizations. Includes a final team-based new product pitch that allows students to apply creativity in a business context. prerequisite: graduate standing

    ENTR 760 SOCIAL ENTERPRISE AND ENTREPRENEURSHIP (3)

    Provides a study of how successful nonprofit organizations respond to the challenges of expanding their impact, being socially responsible and fiscally accountable, and finding new sources of revenue. The course will investigate innovative ways to generate both financial and social returns on their investments. Students will engage with live social entrepreneurs to evaluate and respond to market opportunities to develop and grow social enterprises. prerequisite: FIN 505 or permission of instructor.

    ENTR 771 THE DESIGN /BUSINESS LINK (3)

    Design could very well be the major competitive strategy for both manufacturing and service companies. This course has two goals: 1) to provide UB students with an understanding of the role of design in today’s business organizations to more effectively use design to achieve the mutual goals of businesspeople and designers, and 2) to teach students how they can invent, produce and distribute their own products and be entrepreneurs. prerequisite: MKTG 505 or area approval

    ENTR 792 Special Topics in Entrepreneurship (1.50)

    As specified in the course syllabus

    ENTR 797 Special Topics in Entrepreneurship (3)

    As specified in the course syllabus

  • FIN: Finance

    FIN 505 ESSENTIALS OF FINANCE (1.50)

    Provides introductory-level coverage of financial management. Topics include financial statement analysis, time value of money, financial markets and interest-rate determination, security pricing and valuation, and decision tools.

    FIN 605 FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT (1.50)

    The course provides intermediate-level coverage of topics in financial statements and their analysis, financial forecasting, security risk and pricing and capital budgeting. The course is designed to build on the basic skills acquired in introductory finance courses. Prerequisites: FIN 505 or permission of MBA program director

    FIN 615 ENTREPRENEURIAL FINANCE (1.50)

    Provides intermediate-level coverage of topics in venture capital and private equity, asset allocation, security risk and pricing, decision-making and nonpublic corporate finance. prerequisite: FIN 605

    FIN 625 CORPORATE FINANCE (1.50)

    Provides advanced-level coverage of capital budgeting and intermediate-level coverage of topics in asset pricing, capital structure, dividend policy, and derivative instruments such as options and futures. prerequisite: FIN 605

    FIN 700 FINANCIAL REPORTING (3)

    Integrates U.S. generally accepted accounting principles and International Financial Reporting Standards to develop students’ understanding of financial accounting transactions, reporting standards and financial statements. Case materials and financial statements of U.S. and international companies are incorporated. Topics include standard setting, financial statement presentation issues, measurement issues (including fair-value accounting) and classification and recognition issues. prerequisites: ACCT 504 or ACCT 505 and FIN 640 or FIN 605

    FIN 704 FINANCIAL MARKETS AND INSTITUTIONS (3)

    Covers the theory and role of efficient financial markets in the general economy; the structure and regulation of the debt, equity and derivative markets; and the functional management of financial institutions, including commercial and investment banks, investment funds and regulatory agencies. prerequisite: FIN 504 or FIN 505

    FIN 705 ADVANCED FINANCIAL ANALYSIS (3)

    Designed to extend the knowledge and skills acquired in FIN 640 by applying the tools of financial analysis and decision-making at an advanced level. A variety of case applications include coverage of diagnostic financial-statement analysis and forecasting; cash-flow measurement and valuation; and management of financial policy. prerequisite: FIN 640 or FIN 605

    FIN 715 INVESTMENT ANALYSIS (3)

    Provides the theory and tools for measuring and managing the risk and return of financial instruments in the context of modern portfolio theory. A variety of stock, bond, option and other financial asset valuation techniques are presented throughout the course. prerequisite: FIN 605

    FIN 720 GLOBAL FINANCE (3)

    Emphasizes two aspects of global finance: 1) international capital market structure, interest rate and exchange rate determination; and 2) international corporate financial management of risk and return. Topics include: interest rate, purchasing power and international Fisher parities; hedging and management of international interest-rate and exchange-rate risk; and foreign exchange forecasting. prerequisite: FIN 605

    FIN 725 RISK MANAGEMENT (3)

    Provides a comprehensive overview of concepts and tools of corporate risk management, including identification and measurement of value-added, risk and managing the trade-off between the two. Topics include: value-at-risk measures; application of options and futures contracts to risk management; and managing interest rate, credit and other forms of operating risk. prerequisite: FIN 605

    FIN 735 PORTFOLIO MANAGEMENT (3)

    Builds upon FIN 715 to address the problems and opportunities of portfolio management rather than individual assets. Topics include both systematic and unsystematic risk and methodologies for making sure that this risk is appropriate for the beneficiaries of the fund. Also addressed are issues in portfolio theory, hedging, macroeconomic analysis, growth versus value stocks and alternative investments as well as staffing and investment policy documentation and compliance. prerequisite: FIN 715

    FIN 750 REAL ESTATE INVESTMENT (3)

    An advanced course in the analysis and valuation of income-producing real property. Topics include real estate cash flow analysis, internal rate of return, analysis under risk and uncertainty, appraisal techniques, alternative financing forms, market analysis and the securitization of real property and mortgages. Both theory and case analysis are employed and students will get an understanding of the value of the ARGUS real estate analysis software. prerequisite: FIN 605

    FIN 770 NEW VENTURE FINANCING (3)

    Covers financing and entrepreneurial organization from startup to initial public offering and beyond. Topics include identification and assessment of capital needs, financial planning, sources of capital and the role of venture capital, and the capital markets in financing entrepreneurial organizations. prerequisite: FIN 640 or FIN 605

    FIN 780 BUSINESS VALUATION (3)

    Business valuation arises in mergers, acquisitions, divestitures, estate taxation, lost profits litigation, buy-out agreements, commercial lending, venture capital, IPOs and other exit strategies. This course addresses valuation modeling, using asset pricing theory and practice and employing advanced applications such as EXCEL and corporate databases. The course material is of interest to students who envision careers as CPAs, business valuation experts, corporate finance analysts and investment bankers. Prerequisite: FIN 605.

    FIN 792 Special Topics in Financial Management (1.50)

    Enables the presentation of specialized topics in finance, allowing flexibility for both the changing developments in finance and the educational needs of students. Topic areas may include entrepreneurial finance, cash and liquidity. Exact topics and prerequisites are posted in the University schedule of classes. May be repeated for credit as topics vary. prerequisite: FIN 640 or FIN 605

    FIN 797 SPECIAL TOPICS IN FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT (3)

    Enables the presentation of specialized topics in finance, allowing flexibility for both the changing developments in finance and the educational needs of students. Topic areas may include entrepreneurial finance, cash and liquidity. Exact topics and prerequisites are posted in the University schedule of classes. May be repeated for credit as topics vary. prerequisite: FIN 640 or FIN 605

    FIN 799 INDIVIDUAL RESEARCH (1 - 3)

    Individual research in an area of interest to the student. The expectation is that work equivalent to a regular graduate course will be completed. Formal paper(s) will be written under the supervision of a full-time faculty member. prerequisites: approval of finance instructor, department chair and academic adviser

  • FSCS: Forensic Science

    FSCS 600 LEGAL ISSUES IN FINANCIAL CRIMES (3)

    Examines the general regulations, general laws, and ethics and business policies associated with financial crimes. Areas of major focus include legal issues facing management and administration, traditional search and seizure as well as privacy issues, manager and supervisor responsibilities, criminal issues and definitions, chain of custody and ethical considerations. This problem-oriented course focuses on applying the holdings of cases and analyses of statutes to different criminal fact patterns. Prerequisite: None

    FSCS 601 LEGAL ISSUES IN HIGH TECHNOLOGY CRIME (3)

    Examines the general regulations, general and computer-related law, and ethics and business policies associated with high technology crime. Areas of major focus include description of legal issues facing management and administration, traditional search and seizure as well as privacy issues, manager and supervisor responsibilities, criminal issues and definitions, chain of custody and ethical considerations. Problem-oriented course that focuses on applying the holdings of cases and analyses of statutes to different criminal fact patterns. Prerequisites: None

    FSCS 602 MONEY LAUNDERING (3)

    An essential element of financial crimes is the ability to move assets in ways that resist detection. Explores frequently used techniques, reviews national and international laws and practices to prevent money laundering, and describes best practices to minimize the ability to use money laundering as part of financial crimes. Prerequisite: None.

    FSCS 610 INDENTIFYING ORGANIZATIONAL LIABILITIES AND CRIME (3)

    Defines problems, logic and theory, research protocols, personal and organizational risks, criminal and civil liabilities, physical security issues, due diligence matters, environmental concerns and sexual harassment issues. Covers responsibilities of the organization and of the individual. Prerequisites: FSCS 601

    FSCS 615 INFORMATION RETRIEVAL : PAPER AND ELECTRONIC (3)

    Explores gathering of information and data, evidence collection, storage and security of records, personnel records and related issues, privacy issues, security of customer information, duties and obligations of the information technology field. Also focuses on legal access to these records. Prerequisite: FSCS 601. Lab Fee

    FSCS 620 FORENSIC INVESTIGATIVE TECHNIQUE I (3)

    Focuses on traditional investigative techniques (interviews and interrogations), simple data collection, physical evidence, fraud detection, data acquisition and computer techniques, reverse engineering, and industrial espionage. Also, examines administrative process, the role of human resources and accounting, organizational processes and structures, and chain of command / management. Intended as an introduction to FSCS 720. Prererequisite: FSCS 601. Lab fee.

    FSCS 630 INTRODUCTION TO CRYPTOGRAPHY (3)

    Provides the historical basis for ciphers and encryption techniques and examines the use of codes and decryption techniques in government and commercial applications. Reviews the responsibilities of a Security Analyst, including recognizing breaches of security, controlling further risk, and identifying methods for gathering forensic evidence. prerequisite: none. Lab Fee

    FSCS 635 IMAGE ANALYSIS (3)

    Examines the effective manipulation of digital images from digital photographs and videotapes. Discusses identification of authenticity and detection of manipulation in addition to detection of fraud and other criminal activity in these digital media. Prerequisite: FSCS 630 Lab Fee.

    FSCS 640 STEGANOGRAPHY (3)

    Steganography is a process by which information is hidden within other media. Presents tools (software) to detect such hidden information, including files, images, network traffic, disks, etc., that masquerade within any system. Also presents the processes of hiding or encrypting data to inhibit a forensic analysis and of the detection and counter-resolution of hidden information. Prerequisite: FSCS 630 and FSCS 635. Lab Fee.

    FSCS 685 ISSUES IN FORENSIC INVESTIGATIONS (3)

    Explores investigative theory and issues of forensic investigations. Examines the use of forensic science to various statutory offenses, solving crimes, and legal proceedings. Presents current issues in forensic investigations and analyzes its impact on the processing of criminal law and administration of justice. Chain of command in evidence preservation and the validity of forensic evidence in criminal proceedings are emphasized throughout the course. prerequisite: none

    FSCS 720 FORENSIC INVESTIGATIVE TECHNIQUES II (3)

    A continuation of FSCS 620 with special attention to computer systems and network systems. Lab Fee required. Prerequisite: FSCS 601 and FSCS 620

    FSCS 724 PROTECTION OF DATA / INFORMATION (3)

    Examines prevention of data / information loss by theft, intrusion, and natural disaster and assessment of vulnerabilities and their remediation. Also presents protocols for security and for effective data storage and examines assessment of risk. Prerequisite: FSCS 615. Lab Fee.

    FSCS 727 COMPUTER AND DIGITAL FORENSICS (3)

    Examines the use of specialized techniques for recovery, authentication, and analysis of electronic data; reconstruction of computer usage; examination of residual data; and authentication of remaining data. Also, examines the effective manipulation of digital images from digital photographs and videotapes. Discusses identifjcation of authenticity and detection of manipulation in addition to detection of fraud and other criminal activity in these digital media. Lab fee required. Prerequisite FSCS 615.

    FSCS 728 INFORMATION SYSTEMS, THREATS, ATTACKS, AND DEFENSE STRATEGIES (3)

    Examines information systems and the threats from malicious activities that attempt to collect data from or disrupt, deny or destroy information within a system. Explores origins of such attacks and effective responses to threat. Also, examines the process of Steganography by which information is hidden within other media. Presents tools (software) to detect such hidden information, including files, images, network traffic, disks, etc., that masquerade within any system. Also presents the processes of hiding or encrypting data to inhibit a forensic analysis and the detection and counter-resolution of hidden information. Lab fee required. prerequisite: FSCS 615 and FSCS 727,

    FSCS 730 INCIDENT RESPONSE (3)

    Explores the development of effective responses to active attacks on computer systems and networks, coupled with analysis of the breakdown of protective measures. Prerequisite FSCS 724

    FSCS 740 GRADUATE INTERNSHIP (3)

    Provides field experience to students through laboratory assignments with various forensic or criminal justice entities. Course is completed at the end of the program and requires submission of a journal and a research paper. Eligible for continuing studies grade. Prerequisite: Successful completion of all foundation courses in MSFS degree program and permission of program director.

    FSCS 750 CAPSTONE COURSE (3)

    Capstone course requires students to integrate and apply knowledge, theories, principles, skills and practical applications learned in Master of Science in Forensic Science- High Technology Crime core courses to actual high technology case scenarios. prerequisite: successful completion of all core courses in M.S. in Forensic Science program and permission of program director.

    FSCS 753 COMPUTER AND DIGITAL SECURITY MANAGEMENT (3)

    A study of the management of networks, types and sources of threats and vulnerabilities, risk management, firewalls and other security issues. Prerequisite: FSCS 615, 727, and 728. Lab Fee.

  • GAHS: Global Affairs/Human Security

    GAHS 504 SEMINAR IN GLOBALIZATION AND SOCIAL CHANGE (3)

    Beginning with an examination of the traditional way of thinking about international relations, this course examines global changes over the past half-century and examines the driving forces of globalization: trade, finance, technology and population growth. The course also explores the impact of globalization on political authority, on conflict between states and groups, on economic and personal well-being and on environmental sustainability. Particular attention is paid to the impact of globalization on state, local and national administrative agencies.

    GAHS 508 INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATION (3)

    Looks broadly at the structure and function of international organization and the pursuit of human security. The course examines a variety of formal institutions, such as the United Nations and its ancillary organizations, the European community and the World Trade Organization, as well as less formal nongovernmental institutions. It also explores international law as a form of organization in addition to international regimes; the implicit norms, rules and processes around which the expectations of global actors converge; and the impact of this complex network of organization via a focus on elements of human security.

    GAHS 510 International Migration and Human Security (3)

    This course will examine international migration from the lens of human security. As such, the course will examine the causes for migration today, the role of the state and international organizations in addressing migrant populations, and the rights and responsibilities of migrants. The course will examine migration from both the perspective of the state and the perspective of the migrant.

    GAHS 600 MANAGING NGOs (3)

    Provides an overview of the nongovernmental sector, nongovernmental organization creation and management of NGOs. The course covers how to create and manage an NGO, the legal requirements for creating an NGO, the roles and responsibilities of members of the board of directors in governing an NGO, managing staff and volunteers, fundraising, income generation possibilities and required reporting.

    GAHS 605 NEW APPROCHES TO ECONOMIC AND SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT (3)

    Critically examines innovative and effective strategies for addressing a variety of social, economic, demographic, urban, ecological and institutional issues in selected nations in Asia, Africa, Latin America and the islands of the Atlantic and Pacific oceans. The course reviews the varied working definitions of "development" using multiple case studies drawn from the work of the World Bank, the Asian and African development banks, the Inter-American Development Bank; the work of Muhammad Yunus and the Grameen Bank; the work of multilateral organizations like the United Nations Development Programme and of a variety of nongovernmental organizations, such as the Institute of International Education, the Academy for Educational Development, the Worldwatch Institute and others. Theories of political economy and local community development are also examined and critiqued.

    GAHS 610 INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT (3)

    Explores the theories, policies and practice of development assistance. As such, the course will enable students to develop their understanding of problems in the field of international development and examine mechanisms for how policies can aid and hinder development in practice. prerequisite: none

    GAHS 740 SEMINAR IN HUMAN SECURITY (3)

    Highly interactive, graduate-level seminar that examines the evolution of human security as a concept distinct from national security and that explores how transnational actors—from global elites to NGOs, intergovernmental organizations to supranational bodies—work together to promote good governance, sustainable development and human well-being. The course pays particular attention to contemporary issues in human security and uses case studies to familiarize students with theories, concepts and ideas as well as their application in the modern world. prerequisite: 24 credits in the M.S. in Global Affairs and Human Security program or permission of the program director

    GAHS 760 LEADERSHIP/ FIELD PLACEMENT SEMINAR (3)

    Graduate-level seminar intended to provide an opportunity to students to integrate learning from their internship/ field placement with course themes and concepts studied in the Global Affairs and Human Security program. prerequisite: permission of the program director

  • HSMG: Health Systems Management

    HSMG 630 THE LEGAL ENVIRONMENT OF HEALTH CARE MANAGEMENT (3)

    Provides a framework for understanding the legal implications of advancing medical technologies and of new forms for health-services financing and delivery systems.

    HSMG 632 Quantitative Tools for Health Systems Management I (3)

    Provides a broad overview of biostatistical methods, concepts and reasoning as applied to decisions in health systems management. Pre-Req: Certification of intermediate level in Excel; or satisfactory completion of the spreadsheet module offered in the HSMG program at UB.

    HSMG 643 EPIDEMIOLOGY OF HEALTH SERVICES (3)

    Provides an introduction to quantitative and methodological approaches to identifying the determinants and distribution of diseases in populations.

    HSMG 650 QUANTITATIVE TOOLS FOR HEALTH SYSTEMS MANAGEMENT II (3)

    Provides an operational understanding of quantitative models to support resource allocation decisions. Students develop an understanding of the process of quantitative modeling; learn to identify appropriate and inappropriate applications of techniques such as linear programming, forecasting, decisions analysis, scheduling and inventory control models; develop a conceptual as well as a computational understanding of these models; and critically evaluate a published operations research application. prerequisite: HSMG 632

    HSMG 660 COMPARATIVE GLOBAL HEALTH AND HUMAN SECURITY (3)

    Examines the social, economic and political determinants of a nation's health-care infrastructure; variations in national capacities and defacto national priorities; the role(s) played by international organizations and initiatives; how wide and persistent disparities influence human security; and the effects that shocks such as regime change or political upheaval, conflict or widespread human rights violations have on health and human security. In addition to basic sanitation ( potable water and managing human waste), access to medicines is emphasized as a fundamental need. Prerequisite: None

    HSMG 691 HEALTH PLANNING & PROGRAM EVALUATION (3)

    Explains the theoretical and historical foundations of health planning, the relationship between health planning and regulation and the application of planning methods.

    HSMG 695 HEALTH CARE MANAGEMENT NFORMATION SYSTEMS (3)

    Provides an extensive overview of information systems in health-care organizations from the perspective of health systems managers.

    HSMG 697 HEALTH INSURANCE AND PRE-PAID HEALTH CARE (3)

    Provides an operational understanding of insurance and alternate payment methods in health care. Includes topics relating to risk management and the roles of government, employers and individuals in the selection and use of insurance products for health care.

    HSMG 698 HEALTH CARE FRAUD AND DETECTION ANALYSIS (3)

    Designed to familiarize students with the working of major federal health programs such as Medicare, Medicaid, and the Children's Health Insurance Program. Identifies patterns of improper and fraudulent payments to providers in these programs, describes the forensic investigative techniques needed to uncover fraudulent financial transactions such as payments, and examines the means to recover payments and to reduce future fraudulent practices. Prerequisites: None.

    HSMG 699 HEALTH FINANCE (3)

    Focuses on selected, topical health-finance issues such as health insurance reform, Medicare finance revisions and emerging health-finance issues, such as preparing and financing a comprehensive national bio-preparedness program.

    HSMG 701 HEALTH ECONOMICS (3)

    An overview of the structure and financing of the U.S. health-care industry. Students learn to apply economic principles to understanding the behavior of consumers, physicians, allied health professionals, hospitals, insurers, employers and government in the health-care market. Examines how the U.S. health-care system compares to health-care systems in other countries.

    HSMG 702 SPECIAL ANALYSIS OF HEALTH CARE FRAUD (3)

    Provides a full understanding of major health-care fraud investigations conducted by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of the Inspector General, and the U.S. Department of Justice Criminal Division . Students study the structure and operation of the Office of the Inspector General and its annual audit activities related to specific health-care programs as well as relevant reports issued by the General Accountability Office pertaining to health-care program improvements that could mitigate health-care fraud. Prerequisite: HSMG 698.

    HSMG 709 INDIVIDUAL RESEARCH (1 - 4)

    Individual research on an academically sound project of interest to the student in consultation with a monitoring faculty member. Depending on the scope and depth of research, from 1 to 4 credits may be earned for successful completion of this course. prerequisite: permission of program director and monitoring faculty member

    HSMG 711 SPECIAL TOPICS IN HEALTH SYSTEMS MANAGEMENT (3)

    This course will cover specific topics, issues and trends in health management that would be of mutual interest to faculty and students alike. This course may substitute for PUAD 75: Policy Issues in Health Care. Prerequisite: None

    HSMG 725 FUNDAMENTALS OF GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SCIENCE AND SYSTEMS (3)

    Provides students with foundational knowledge in both geographic information science and Systems that will allow them to better understand and think critically about the role of "place and space" and to engage in the routine use of basic GIS technology in their studies and workplace. Students will learn to use ESRl's ArcGIS to create maps and analyze geo-data and relationships, and to present their results to others. prerequisite: none

    HSMG 750 HEALTH CARE SYSTEMS, ORGANIZATION AND MANAGEMENT (3)

    Analysis of the structure of the present American health-care system and of the costs, benefits and political realities of possible reforms. The current and future role of public administration, planning and evaluation in American health care.

    HSMG 751 LONG-TERM CARE ADMINISTRATION (3)

    Provides an in-depth knowledge of various long-term care facilities and the relevant administration entities involved. It is the study of the functions of a long-term care facility and its organizational management. It will also discuss the history of long-term care administration and its accreditation entities. prerequisites: none.

    HSMG 752 INTERNSHIP (3)

    Serves to build a bridge between theory and practice. Students have the opportunity to apply their knowledge and acquire insights into the management of health service organizations. prerequisite: completion of 27 graduate credits prior to beginning course or permission of program director

    HSMG 753 POLICY ISSUES IN HEALTH CARE (3)

    Study of a few current policy issues in the American health-care system. Particular attention to the roles and powers of nonmedical participants, including consumers, planners, administrators and policymakers.

    HSMG 755 HEALTH ADMINISTRATION (3)

    Problems and issues with performing such basic managerial functions as direction, control and staffing in health-care institutions. Emphasis on analyzing tools and techniques that are important in fulfilling these managerial functions.

    HSMG 756 MANAGED CARE ADMINISTRATION (3)

    Basic theoretical concepts concerning managed care, practical management issues and areas of controversy as they pertain to managed care. Topics include benefit design in managed care, structure and management of managed-care delivery systems, financing of managed care and future trends in managed care.

    HSMG 757 STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT FOR HEALTH CARE (3)

    Examination of strategic management in health-care organizations. Included are discussions of the nature of strategic management, the environment of health organizations and methods of environmental analysis, and methods of formulating, implementing and controlling the strategic management of health-care delivery. prerequisites: HSMG 632, HSMG 650 and either PUAD 750 or PUAD 751, or permission of M.S. in Health Systems Management program director

    HSMG 766 HEALTH SYSTEMS MGMT: ORGANIZATIONAL DESIGN AND HUMAN RESOURCES (3)

    Builds on PUAD 755 and provides an in-depth examination of organizational design theories, their applicability to various health-care settings and their implications for human resources and labor relations.

  • HSAD: Human Services Administration

    HSAD 600 FUNDRAISING AND GRANT WRITING (3)

    Provides students with a through grounding in the principles and practices of fundraising and grant proposal development. Structured to mirror the process of fundraising management, the course leads students to develop either a fundraising plan or grant proposal for their own nonprofit entity or a case study of the organization. Students consider planning frameworks and a variety of conceptual tools before moving on to consider donor behavior ( the underlying psychology and sociology) and each major form of fundraising in turn. The course concludes with an examination of the critical managerial and sectoral issues impacting fundraising, such as campaign integration, benchmarking of performance , and public trust and confidence.

    HSAD 600 FUNDRISING AND GRANT WRITING (3)

    Provides students with a thorough grounding in the principles and practices of fundrising and grant proposal development. Structured to mirror the process of fundrising management, the course leads students to develop either a fundrising plan or grant proposal for their own nonprofit entity or a case study of the organization. Students consider planning frameworks and a variety of conceptual tools before moving on to consider donor behavior (the underlying psychology and sociology) and each major form of fundrising in turn. The course concludes with an examination of the critical managerial and sectoral issues impacting fundrising, such as campaign integration, benchmarking of performance, and public trust and confidence. Prerequisite: None

    HSAD 602 HISTORY AND FOUNDATION OF HUMAN SERVICES SYSTEMS (3)

    History and foundations of human services practice. Societal factors that have fostered the evolution of human services are emphasized and basic strategies and tactics common to the delivery of human services are reviewed.

    HSAD 603 CONTEMPORARY ISSUES IN HUMAN SERVICE ADMINISTRATION (3)

    Overview of the current status of the field of human services and the political, sociocultural and economic contexts of administration. Discussion of the conceptual and theoretical issues related to the practical skills necessary for administering human services agencies. Offered at Coppin State University. prerequisite: HSAD 602 or permission of instructor

    HSAD 610 Strategies for Human Services Program Planning (3)

    Focuses on the various properties and implications of planned change. Emphasis on models, strategies and roles required when working within organizations and in the community to develop new programs with input from a variety of stakeholders.

    HSAD 611 PROGRAM EVALUATION AND POLICY ANALYSIS (3)

    Study of the conceptual and methodological issues concerning the evaluation of human services programs. Includes focus on statistical and data analysis skills and on the relationships between the program/policy design and analysis/evaluation. Offered at Coppin State University. prerequisite: HSAD 610 or permission of instructor

    HSAD 620 HUMAN SERVICES LEADERSHIP & SUPERVISION (3)

    Theoretical and practical analysis of organizational leadership, personnel (employee and volunteer) supervision, workplace design and the ethical dimension of leadership in human services agencies. Provides training in organizational relationships and staff development. Job-related case studies are used to apply principles of supervision and leadership. Offered at Coppin State University.

    HSAD 621 ADMINISTRATIVE DECISION-MAKING IN HUMAN SERVICE AGENCIES (3)

    Decision-making at the individual, work group, departmental and organizational levels within the context of human services agencies. Emphasizes development of skills necessary for securing consistency of practice, the coordination of various planning units and the economizing of planning efforts. prerequisite: HSAD 620 or permission of instructor

    HSAD 695 FIELD PRACTICUM I: HUMAN SERVICES ADMINISTRATION (3)

    Fieldwork training experience at a human services agency under the guidance of the UB and Coppin State program directors and an on-site agency mentor. Eligible for continuing studies grade. prerequisite: permission of program directors

    HSAD 696 FIELD PRACTICUM II: HUMAN SERVICES ADMINISTRATION (3)

    Continuation of HSAD 695. Fieldwork training experience at a human services agency under the guidance of the UB and CSU program directors and an on-site agency mentor. Eligible for continuing studies grade. Offered at Coppin State University. prerequisites: HSAD 695 and permission of program directors

    HSAD 698 RESEARCH PRACTICUM I: Program Planning, Implementation, Evaluation (3)

    Under the guidance of the program directors and a research committee, the student prepares an original work that displays research and writing skills. Topics include a realistic, feasible plan for a new human services program, implementation of a new program and/or evaluation of a program. Eligible for continuing studies grade. Offered at Coppin State University. prerequisite: permission of program directors

    HSAD 699 RESEARCH PRACTICUM II: PROGRAM PLANNING, IMPLEMENTATION, EVALUATION (3)

    The student continues to prepare the original work begun in HSAD 698 and will then formally defend the work before his/her research committee. prerequisite: HSAD 698

  • INSS: Information Science/Systems

    INSS 605 IT FOR BUSINESS TRANSFORMATION (3)

    Examines the key roles that information systems and technologies play in the current business environment as well as the disruptive and innovative nature of information systems in promoting the fundamental transformation of industries, businesses and society. Covers current major issues in the field of management of information systems, such as social computing, cybersecurity, big data and mobile technologies. Prerequisites: graduate standing.

    INSS 611 Data Science Toolkit I (3)

    This course will introduce the basis of using the python programming language in data science, specifically to collect and manipulate data in preparation for exploratory data analysis and prediction. No prior programming experience is required. Topics will include python data structures, program logic and libraries, as well as data wrangling and data management. Types of data sources covered will include databases as well as unstructured data sources such as social media feeds.

    INSS 612 Data Science Toolkit II (3)

    The effectiveness of business analytics depends on the quality of the data fed into the analytics models used. Data scientists can spend as much as 60% of their time cleaning and organizing data. This course focuses on preparing data for analytics tasks, to improve the accuracy and reliability of the results. Using python students will learn to "wrangle" (clean, transform, merge and reshape) data. Techniques will include data parsing, data correction, and data standardization.

    INSS 621 Digital Transformation (1.50)

    Digital technologies are playing a transformative role in the modern world. The changes associated with digital innovations such as social media, block-chain technology and smart embedded devices are rapidly disrupting a variety of industries across the globe and challenging institutions, organizational structures, and most importantly, the skillset needed for a successful workforce. This course focuses on bleeding-edge technologies and digital business transformation. It enables students to understand the challenges and opportunities of the dynamic complex and disruptive technological business environment of the digital age.

    INSS 622 Digital Innovation (1.50)

    The digital revolution is constantly challenging businesses and managers to adapt to new realities. Many organizations are establishing market leadership in today's competitive environment by mastering digital innovation. This course is designed to assist students in understanding that the fundamental nature of digital innovation is not about information technology, but is about thinking differently about how to organize to create value. It aims to equip students to competently identify technological and organizational opportunities, lead digital initiatives and develop new business models for existing and emerging organizations. Topics include digital disruption and innovation, digital platforms, digital business models and digital product and service development.

    INSS 641 LEADERSHIP OF THE IT FUNCTION (3)

    Focuses on the role of the chief information officer. Today’s CIO proactively assesses and balances the organization’s technological and business environment in a partnership with the CEO. Topics include structure of the IT function, planning and measuring IT-business alignment, enterprise architecture, systems integration, applications portfolio, project planning and management, systems development and implementation, change management, insourcing, outsourcing, vendor management, operations and control management, IT human resource management and legal and ethical issues. Various facets of the CIO’s role are explored through published case studies of real organizations. Background readings are assigned as preparatory work for class-based case discussions. prerequisite: INSS 640 or INSS 605

    INSS 650 NETWORKING AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS (3)

    Provides a solid understanding of fundamentals as well as state-of-the-art networks and telecommunications used in business. Topics include communications layers and architectures, physical and data link layer, network and transport layer, local area networks (LANs), local intranets, wireless LANs, backbone networks, virtual LANs, collapsed backbones, telephone service, voice-over IP, wide area networks, packet-switching concepts, frame relay, ATM, VPN, Internet infrastructure (NAPs, MAEs and backbone), network management and infrastructure security. This course focuses on the TCP/IP architecture, but the OSI model is presented and discussed. It also covers Microsoft Windows networking TCP/IP concepts, including architecture, fixed and dynamic IP addresses, subnet mask calculation, NetBIOS Resolution, IP routing and resolution, and DHCP and DNS services. prerequisite: INSS 605

    INSS 651 DATABASE MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS (3)

    Examines the theories and concepts employed in database management systems (DBMS) and the efficiencies and economics of such systems. The course specifically addresses steps in the database cycle, including normalization, database design, implementation and developing queries using SQL. The functions of various types of DBMS are described, including their purpose, advantages, disadvantages and applications in business. Data administration, data requirements for ERP systems and data security issues are also covered. prerequisite: INSS 640 or INSS 605

    INSS 671 SYSTEMS ANALYSIS AND DESIGN (3)

    Introduces students to key principles and techniques used to develop or modify information systems to support business undertakings. The emphasis is on the determination and modeling of the requirements of information systems and software. Topics include business process re-engineering and the modeling of business processes; data modeling; data gathering and requirements specification; interface design; and the development of systems prototypes, including electronic forms and reports. Students will gain experience with leading industry development tools such as those from Oracle and Peoplesoft. prerequisites: computer literacy and word processing, spreadsheet and database competencies

    INSS 701 INTERNET DEVELOPMENT FOR BUSINESS (3)

    Covers the issues involved with managing an organization’s website. Issues include content management, scalability, security, reliability and usability. Topics include tools and techniques for developing and managing large-scale websites, such as Dreamweaver, ColdFusion and XML. prerequisites: computer, browser and network literacy

    INSS 703 PRINCIPLES OF INFORMATION SECURITY MANAGEMENT (3)

    Awareness and management of information security has become critical to the management of any organization. This course focuses on the need for businesses to adapt to the changing security landscape, and provides an introduction to the different domain areas in information security from a managerial perspective. Topics will include security governance, legal regulations and compliance, environmental security, operations security, access controls, network security, disaster recovery response, and cryptography.

    INSS 722 Visual Business Intelligence (3)

    This course will introduce students to the use of data visualization and visual business intelligence in a business environment. Students will develop a framework and language for analyzing and critiquing the visualization of data, and learn to use data visualizations to effective support decision making. Topics will include data abstraction and validation, and how to handle different types of data, dataset and attribute types. Students will use software tools to create visualizations. Prerequisite: INSS 605

    INSS 737 STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT OF INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY (3)

    Covers information systems strategy and management from a top management perspective. Information technology is an integral part of most products and services of the post-industrial society of the 21st century and has changed the top management job. Topics include business models and organization forms in the information age, IT as a business enabler, IT and competitive strategy, information for management control, analysis and redesign of business structure and processes, knowledge management and information networks, interorganizational networks, sourcing strategies, interfacing with the IT function, reliability and security, and ethical and policy issues. The course relies extensively on the case method, and students supplement their analyses with current information obtained from the Web or directly from the firms under study in the cases. prerequisite: INSS 640 or INSS 605

    INSS 738 ADVANCED DATABASE SYSTEMS (3)

    Examines current trends and major issues in databases, including data warehousing; data mining; data quality; data stewardship; Web-based systems; and object-oriented, distributed and enterprise-wide systems. This course uses software systems like ORACLE and PeopleSoft to demonstrate some of these concepts. prerequisite: INSS 651

    INSS 739 SYSTEMS ARCHITECTURE (3)

    Covers the process and techniques used in the design and implementation of information systems. Emphasis is on systems architecture and on the integration of new systems into an existing infrastructure. Topics include types of system architecture, large-scale system design, including middleware and software components, database design and integration. prerequisite: INSS 671

    INSS 740 INTRODUCTION TO SECURITY MANAGEMENT (3)

    An overview of principles and issues in business and organizational security management. Students examine the challenges embodied in various aspects of security mentioned above. Planning for loss prevention and the protection of assets is examined. Students use situational analyses, case studies and other research-oriented approaches. prerequisite: INSS 640 or INSS 605

    INSS 742 DATA MINING FOR STRATEGIC ADVANTAGE (3)

    An overview of data mining and how these techniques can be used to predict behavior patterns. Emphasizes both theoretical and practical understanding related to pattern recognitions, trends, predictions, categorization and exploration used in data mining. Security, ethical and legal issues related to data mining are examined. Applications of data mining tools in business security, marketing and government are presented. Students use situational analyses, case studies and other research-oriented approaches. prerequisites: OPRE 504 and INSS 640

    INSS 751 OPERATING SYSTEMS (3)

    Provides a solid understanding of modern operating systems (OS) concepts and trends—distributed computing, parallel architecture and open systems. Topics include kernel, process and threads, concurrency and deadlock, scheduling, memory management, storage area network (SAN), network attached storage (NAT), disk performance, redundant array of independent disks (RAID), file systems, symmetric multiprocessing (SMP), clusters, middleware, distributed processing and client/server and OS security. Covers Microsoft Windows and Linux basic concepts including overview at both the graphical user-interface and command-prompt levels, basic tools to manage applications and processes, devices, services, users, drives and partitions, virtual memory (swapfiles), networking and security. This is a project-oriented course, offering hands-on experience in both Windows and Linux. prerequisite: INSS 640 or INSS 605

    INSS 752 WEB SERVER MANAGEMENT AND CGI PROGRAMMING (3)

    Provides an understanding of Web server installation, setup and management (particularly Apache and IIS); developing interactive, server-based applications with the Web Common Gateway Interface (CGI), Active Server Pages (ASP) or PHP; and applications manipulating databases on the Web (particularly MySQL). Topics include HTML and forms review, Apache and IIS Web Server, CGI specifications, Practical Extraction and Report Language (Perl) scripts syntax, commands and CGI libraries, creating and porting CGI scripts, installation and use of MySQL database server, Perl DBI and MySQL, integrating Apache and MySQL, ASP and PHP concepts. prerequisites: INSS 651 and INSS 701

    INSS 753 INFORMATION SECURITY AND BUSINESS CONTINUITY (3)

    This course focuses on information security at a strategic level, particularly information security governance and risk management, and business continuity. The key issues associated with protecting business information assets will be examined, including how risk and security assessments should be done in terms of impact on systems, staff, reputation and market share. Topics will include information security management, disaster recovery response, governance and compliance frameworks, and information security policy. prerequisite: INSS 605

    INSS 765 e-COMMERCE TECHNOLOGIES AND APPLICATIONS (3)

    Provides a managerial and technical perspective on e-commerce applications. Emphasis is on the operational, tactical and strategic applications of e-commerce and the major technologies involved in their development. Covers the different types of e-commerce, the technologies and techniques involved and the major issues facing organizations conducting electronic commerce. Managerial topics include mobile commerce; business, consumer and government e-commerce uses; and legal and regulatory issues. Technical topics include network infrastructure, e-commerce security and data representation, and transformation and exchange technologies such as XML. prerequisite: INSS 605 or INSS 640 or equivalent

    INSS 784 PROJECT MANAGEMENT (3)

    Strong project management is key to a successful IT project. This course examines the principal elements in effective project management as well as tools and techniques for managing the process. Topics include stakeholder analysis, project design and organization, estimating and budgeting, scheduling, identifying and managing risk, project communications and project metrics, and control. prerequisite: INSS 640 or INSS 605

    INSS 792 ADVANCED TOPICS IN DATABASE MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS (3)

    Examines current and emerging trends, technologies and practices in database management systems. Topics may include but are not limited to data warehousing, data mining, distributed database systems, knowledge discovery tools and database design for customer relations management. prerequisite: INSS 738 or permission of the instructor

    INSS 797 ADVANCED TOPICS IN INFORMATION SYSTEMS (1 - 3)

    An exploration of advanced topics in information systems of interest to faculty and students. Topics are selected and printed in the schedule of classes. Pre-requisite: INSS 605 or INSS 640

    INSS 799 INDIVIDUAL .RESEARCH : INFORMATION SYSTEMS (1 - 3)

    Prerequisites: approval of information systems instructor, department chair and academic adviser

  • IMTC: Innovation Mgmt/Tech Commerce

    IMTC 601 BUSINESS FUNDAMENTALS FOR ENTREPRENEURS AND INNOVATORS I (3)

    Designed to be one of the first two courses in business for M.S. in Innovation Management and Technology Commercialization candidates from non-business backgrounds. Topics covered focus on aspects of business and management studies relevant to new venture creation and innovation. These include small-team formation and leadership, creativity, marketing new products and services and other relevant topics. prerequisite: admission to the M.S. in Innovation Management and Technology Commercialization program or permission of instructor

    IMTC 602 BUSINESS FUNDAMENTALS FOR ENTREPRENEURS AND INNOVATORS II (3)

    Designed to be one of the first two courses in business for M.S. in Innovation Management and Technology Commercialization candidates from nonbusiness backgrounds. Topics covered focus on aspects of business and management studies relevant to new venture creation and innovation. These include accounting and finance topics such as accounting for intangibles, valuation, finance, sources of finance and other relevant topics. prerequisite: admission to the M.S. in Innovation Management and Technology Commercialization program or permission of instructor

    IMTC 750 INTRO TO INNOVATION MANAGMENT AND TECHNOLOGY COMMERCIALIZATION (3)

    Designed to be the survey course for the M.S. in Innovation Management and Technology Commercialization program. Topics covered include the innovation process, creativity, research and development, technology transfer and new product development. prerequisite: IMTC 601 or permission of instructor

    IMTC 761 PATENTS, TRADEMARKS AND TECHNOLOGY (3)

    Introduces students to three important areas of intellectual property law: trade secrets, patents, and trademarks. Together, these bodies of law protect the technology, image, and brand for products, processes, and services. The course addresses the policies underlying the protection of intellectual property and compares the different ways intellectual property can be used to protect commercial interests, particularly in rapidly changing technological areas like computers and the Internet. This course is intended for students who want an introduction to intellectual property. prerequisite: IMTC 750 or permission of instructor

    IMTC 790 MANAGING THE GROWING TECHNOLOGY FIRM (3)

    This course addresses the principal business-related issues facing senior- and middle-level managers in growing technology-oriented firms. Topics covered include marketing, strategy, human resources management and managerial accounting as each relates to this organizational setting. prerequisite: IMTC 750 or permission of instructor

    IMTC 791 RESOURCE ACQUISITION FOR TECHNOLOGY VENTURES (3)

    Addresses the processes by which technology ventures acquire resources to implement strategies. Topics covered include bootstrapping, angel financing, venture capital, strategic alliances, corporate venturing, licensing and government financing of technology ventures. prerequisite: IMTC 602 or permission of instructor

    IMTC 792 INNOVATION IN DEVELOPING AND EMERGING ECONOMICS (3)

    Addresses the distinctive innovation practices in developing and emerging economies. Topics covered include frugal production, reverse innovation, and bottom-of-the-pyramid strategies. prerequisite: IMTC 750 or permission of instructor

  • IDIA: Interaction Design/Info Arch

    IDIA 602 GRAPHIC DESIGN PRINCIPLES (3)

    Emphasizes strategies for visual problem-solving and techniques for creating comprehensive layouts using principles of design and typography. Hands-on course for students with a limited background in graphic design. Pass/fail grading. Lab fee required.

    IDIA 612 INTERACTION DESIGN (3)

    Explores electronic environments as fluid spaces where interactions among people, machines and media (words, images, sounds, video, animations, simulations) must be structured for the unforeseen. The course focuses on planning, analyzing, prototyping and integrating interaction design with interface design. Lab fee required. Prerequisite: PBDS 501 or passing score on HTML Proficiency Exam.

    IDIA 614 SEQUENTIAL VISUALIZATION AND ANALYSIS (3)

    Teaches students to use sequential visual narratives—storyboards, flowcharts, prototypes and simulations—as analysis tools for the development of information systems. The course draws on theoretical approaches to film as well as other forms of visual storytelling, including animation, illustration and comics. Through a series of practical, analytical and creative projects, students learn to apply storyboards and limited multimedia prototypes to interface design and develop content. Lab fee required.

    IDIA 616 DESIGNING FOR MOBILE WEB (3)

    Hands-on application and site development for the mobile Web. Students learn current programming languages and development environments for the latest mobile devices and work intensively on a major mobile design project. Lab fee required. prerequisite: PBDS 501 or passing score on the HTML Proficiency Exam

    IDIA 618 DYNAMIC WEB SITES (3)

    Familiarizes students with the basic concepts and vocabulary of website programming, including application scripting, and database management. Provides students with the fundamental skills required to develop and maintain a dynamic, data-driven website. Each student develops a complete website using a simple text editor to create and manipulate relational data, learn a middleware markup language to store and retrieve data and control the rules of interaction, and write HTML to format data and control display. Lab fee required. Prerequisite: PBDS 501 or passing score on HTML Proficiency Exam.

    IDIA 619 PROGRAMMING FOR UX DESIGN (3)

    Practical and theoretical introduction to genres, strategies and techniques for producing client-side interactive projects for the Internet. Students use a scripting language to create interactive information tools such as games, simulations and dynamic websites. Background readings provide theoretical and practical context for development of individual projects. Lab fee required. Prerequisite: PBDS 501 or passing score on HTML Proficiency Exam.

    IDIA 630 INFORMATION ARCHITECTURE (3)

    Teaches students to gather requirements data, model information structures and develop a variety of documents to communicate the information architecture to other participants, including technical experts, usability experts, clients and users. Students learn to determine a target audience, develop personas or user profiles, refine and validate requirements and create site maps and other “specs” and wire frames. Lab fee required. prerequisite: PBDS 660 or passing score on Hypermedia Proficiency Exam

    IDIA 640 HUMANS, COMPUTERS, AND COGNITION (3)

    Introduces concepts, theories and methods that support the study of human-computer interaction and user-centered system design. Students apply concepts from cognitive psychology and visual processing to explore human problem-solving, learning, knowledge representation, and problems of interface design. Prepares students to understand and analyze research based on empirical study of human behavior in its variety and complexity and on models of learning and understanding. Lab fee required.

    IDIA 642 RESEARCH METHODS FOR INTERACTION DESIGN (3)

    Introduces the chief methods for studying users' interactions with software and information resources in ways that support design decisions. Encompasses both quantitative and qualitative methods, including methods such as surveys, focus groups, field studies, and traditional usability studies. Lab fee required.

    IDIA 712 TOPICS IN ADV INTERACTION DESIGN (3)

    Intensive exploration of topics in advanced interaction design of mutual interest to students and faculty. Content varies according to the concurrent interests of faculty and students. Course may be repeated for credit when topic changes. Lab fee required. prerequisite: PBDS 660 or passing score on the hypermedia proficiency exam and IDIA 612

    IDIA 715 MANAGING UX PROJECTS (3)

    Introduces students to managing projects that deal with interaction design, user research, and information architecture. Through project-based assignments, students learn how to scope, manage, and organize user experience teams. Lab fee required.

    IDIA 730 TOPICS IN ADVANCED INFORMATION ARCHITECTURE (3)

    Intensive exploration of topics in advanced information architecture of mutual interest to students and faculty. Content varies according to the concurrent interests of faculty and students. Course may be repeated for credit when topic changes. Lab fee required. Prerequisite: PBDS 501 or passing score on the hypermedia proficiency exam, and lDlA 630.

    IDIA 742 TOPICS IN USER RESEARCH (3)

    Intensive exploration of topics in user research of mutual interest to students and faculty. Content varies depending on the interests of faculty and students. Course may be repeated for credit when topic changes. Lab Fee required. Prerequisite: PBDS 501 or passing score on the hypermedia proficiency exam in addition to IDIA 642

    IDIA 750 SPECIAL TOPICS (3)

    Intensive exploration of topics in hypermedia, information architecture or interaction design of mutual interest to students and faculty. Course may be repeated for credit when topic changes. Lab fee required. prerequisite: PBDS 660 or passing score on Hypermedia Proficiency Exam

    IDIA 790 INDEPENDENT STUDY (1 - 3)

    Research or problem-solving project in some aspect of publications design. Topics and number of credits vary with individual student interests. Eligible for continuing studies grade. Lab fee required. prerequisite: permission of program director

    IDIA 798 CONTINUOUS ENROLLMENT (1)

    Provides continuing faculty direction, academic support services and enrollment services for students who have completed all course requirements for the degree but have not completed a thesis or final project. Course may be repeated for credit as needed. Grading is pass/fail. Prerequisite: completion of all course requirements for degree program.

    IDIA 799 THESIS/ PROJECT (3 - 6)

    Preparation of a work of original research or a substantial interactive or interface project displaying practical knowledge of relevant research. Each student develops a substantial thesis project that incorporates user research. Projects and research are presented to program faculty for critique. Eligible for continuing studies (CS) grade. Lab fee required. Prerequisites: PBDS 501 or passing score on HTML Proficiency Exam, and permission of program director.

  • LEST: Legal Studies

    LEST 500 LEGAL RESEARCH AND ANALYSIS (3)

    Intensive course on the ways law and regulations are made and interpreted, the sources of legal research and proper styles of legal citation. Students are required to learn how to read and analyze court decisions and to write effectively about legal issues. Required of all students in the first semester upon entering the program.

    LEST 501 LEGAL AND ETHICAL FOUNDATIONS (3)

    In-depth exploration of the organization of the American legal system, the practical basis of law, how lawyers think and the workings of the adversarial system. Examines how law is organized as a field of knowledge and practice and how it functions as an instrument of government and arena of dispute resolution. Raises issues of law’s relationship to other disciplines such as philosophy, history and the social sciences and assesses law’s effectiveness in promoting justice and social policies. Grading: letter grade only.

    LEST 506 HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVES (3)

    Explores the Anglo-American legal tradition from a variety of perspectives, including U.S. constitutional history, the role of the common law in the establishment of America’s legal systems and Maryland’s legal history. Considers the broader Western tradition of constitutionalism, limited government, religious toleration and fundamental rights in relation to contemporary legal issues. A research paper is required.

    LEST 507 LEGAL AND ETHICAL ARGUMENTS (3)

    Intensive course on the theory and practice of legal, ethical and policy arguments. Includes case analyses and exercises in the practical application of theories of persuasion. Explores the differing character of arguments for different professional contexts and audiences.

    LEST 508 LAW AND MORALITY (3)

    Study of traditional and contemporary views on the nature of law and the nature of morality, and the ways they relate. Does the American legal system promote goodness and social justice? Topics covered include theories of justice and legitimacy, natural law and natural rights, legal positivism and various applied topics including legal protection of basic rights, equal protection under the law and civil disobedience.

    LEST 600 COMPLEX LEGAL ANALYSIS (3)

    Advanced legal analysis and writing. Emphasizes high-level comprehension of cases and statutes, solidification of good legal research techniques and effective presentation of written legal analysis and argument. Students look at important legal issues, as a means of developing skills useful in law, in a variety of areas as subjects for class discussion and exercises and writing assignments. prerequisite: LEST 500

    LEST 601 ETHICS AND ADVOCACY (3)

    Provides a detailed study of current legal ethics. Promotes understanding of ethical conflicts faced by lawyers in their daily professional and personal lives, demonstrates methods of reconciliation of conflicts among competing ethical rules and standards, and compares and contrasts legal ethics with conventional ethical norms. Surveys the contemporary culture of the legal profession in its various settings, including professional, judicial and educational environments in which legal ethics are embedded. prerequisites: LEST 501, LEST 507 and LEST 508 or permission of program director

    LEST 602 ORIGINS OF LAW (3)

    Examination of the concepts that have been used as the basis for legal systems around the world, including common law, civil law and various non-Western and traditional systems. Considers the legal relationship between the individual and the state in these systems as well as the key elements and procedures used by each and what they can tell us about the essential nature of legal systems and the law itself.

    LEST 603 LAW OF CONTRACTS (3)

    Explores the elements of a legally enforceable agreement, defenses to contract actions and statutory modifications to the common law of contracts. Considers the balancing of different interests in contemporary contract law, including considerations of fairness, social and economic policy objectives, and individuals' freedom to structure commercial and personal relationships.

    LEST 604 LAW OF BUSINESS ORGANIZATIONS (3)

    Introduction to the law of business organizations, including their history, function and public policy implications. Forms covered include individual proprietorships, partnerships and corporations as well as newer variations such as limited liability companies. Topics include methods of finance and control and the rights and obligations of the principals, agents and third parties.

    LEST 605 AREAS OF LAW (3)

    Varying course offering that explores a particular area of law. Course may be repeated for credit when topic differs.

    LEST 606 FAMILY LAW (3)

    The legal problems confronting modem families. Examines the law of marriage, marriage-like relationships, cohabitation and divorce, in the context of the ever-changing definition of family. Also considers legal issues relating to children, including custody, support and the complications arising from reproductive technologies.

    LEST 607 PROPERTY LAW (3)

    Basic law of property, including philosophical and ethical justifications and important historical developments in the scheme of ownership in Anglo-American Law. Focus is on current property law from the viewpoint of its underlying rationales and policy considerations.

    LEST 609 EMPLOYMENT LAW (3)

    The law of employment in its social, ethical and historical contexts. Examines common law principles of employment contracts, the employment at will doctrine and a wide range of regulatory regimes governing work. Students consider leading cases in their economic, social and historical contexts and employment law in its practical and principled applications by taking up the ethics of human resources and industrial relations.

    LEST 610 LEGAL TOPICS (3)

    Varying course offering that explores a particular issue, context or method of the law. Course may be repeated for credit where topic differs.

    LEST 614 TORTS (3)

    The civil law of reparation for harm done by wrongful acts. Examines many of the causes of action available under theories of intentional wrongdoing, negligence and strict liability. Considers the range of problems and issues that arise in contemporary practice as well as their historical roots.

    LEST 615 CRIMINAL LAW (3)

    Substantive, procedural and constitutional criminal law. Criminal law involves those actions that society identifies as particularly contrary to morality and society's best interests. Students study the classification of certain actions as crimes and the rationales for such classification, based on the Model Penal Code and Maryland Criminal Law. Examines the criminal process from investigation through appeal, including features mandated by both state law and the U.S. Constitution. prerequisite: LEST 500

    LEST 616 CONSTITUTIONAL LAW (3)

    The American constitutional form of government and the amendments establishing individual rights. Focuses on the parts of the U.S. Constitution that are concerned with civil liberties but also with the structure in which such liberties are protected. Emphasizes First Amendment, due process and equal protection. prerequisite: LEST 500

    LEST 617 ADMINISTRATIVE LAW (3)

    The history, function and powers of administrative agencies. Covers administrative agencies on the federal level and parallel state and local government level. Examines the function of administrative agencies generally, including their rule-making and adjudicative powers, and practice and procedure before such agencies. Includes the study of judicial review of administrative agency decisions.

    LEST 620 PHILOSOPHY OF LAW (3)

    Jurisprudential approach to both historical and contemporary theories of law, focusing on such problems as the justification of authority, the obligation to obey law, civil disobedience, the relationship between law and morality, problems of interpretation and judicial decision-making, and the role of the Supreme Court in a democratic society.

    LEST 624 PROFESSIONAL ETHICS (3)

    An overview of professional ethics in law, business, finance, health care and other fields. Covers ethical concepts that apply across professions as well as many of the specific ethical rules that apply to particular professions. Considers the rules in the context of important legal cases and controversial contemporary problems. Includes the study of ethical theory as well as applications.

    LEST 625 TOPICS IN APPLIED ETHICS (3)

    Varying course offering that explores a particular topic in applied ethics. Course may be repeated for credit where topic differs.

    LEST 626 THE TRIAL PROCESS (3)

    The procedural, evidentiary and strategic aspects of litigation. Introduces the basics of pleadings, discovery, motion practice, rules of evidence and trial techniques. Covers how court cases are initiated, prepared and tried. Includes participation in a mock trial.

    LEST 628 ENVIRONMENTAL LAW AND ETHICS (3)

    The pressing ethical, legal and political issues facing the world today that have to do with the relationship between humans and the nonhuman world. Explores environmental ethics through classic and contemporary readings from a wide array of philosophic and literary traditions. Examines the role legal institutions play in our efforts (or lack thereof) to deal with ethical issues involving the environment.

    LEST 629 BIOMEDICAL ETHICS (3)

    Explores the ethical considerations that affect legal decision-making on biomedical issues. Among the subjects that may be considered are medical paternalism, patient autonomy and informed consent, research involving human subjects, justice in health care, genetic testing, enhancement, euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide. The focus is on developing an understanding of varied ethical perspectives and how they relate to controversial biomedical issues. prerequisite: none

    LEST 630 LAW AND HISTORY SEMINAR (3)

    Varying course offering that explores a particular topic in legal history. Course may be repeated for credit where topic differs. prerequisites: LEST 501 and 506 or permission of the program director.

    LEST 696 LEGAL STUDIES INTERNSHIP (3)

    Application of legal knowledge and skills at a nonprofit organization, governmental entity or business. Students select an appropriate site with the approval of the program director. Students learn about the role law plays in the activities or services of the site and how law is used to address issues and solve problems. prerequisite: approval of the program director

    LEST 698 INTERNSHIP IN APPLIED ETHICS (3)

    Provides observation and firsthand experience of the practice of ethics at designated profit, nonprofit or government organizations. Students work with a mentor at an appropriate organization they have selected and write an ongoing journal of their involvement as well as a critical essay on applied ethics related to their internship experience. prerequisite: approval of program director

    LEST 699 INDEPENDENT RESEARCH (1 - 3)

    Individual research on an academic project of interest to the student in consultation with a monitoring faculty member. prerequisite: approval of program director

  • MGMT: Management

    MGMT 605 LEADING WITH INTEGRITY (1.50)

    Focuses on leadership, integrity and core management principles. Provides an overview of concepts and practices essential to managerial effectiveness, including developing a vision for the organization in a complex business environment, setting objectives, planning, motivating others, managing for results, and a grounding in ethics at the individual and organizational level. prerequisite: graduate standing

    MGMT 615 MANAGING IN A DYNAMIC ENVIRONMENT (3)

    Covers the processes and necessary skills for leading and managing people in organizations that compete in dynamic environments. Emphasizes leading and motivating diverse employee populations in global organizations, and human resource management issues, including evaluation, rewards, and employment law. prerequisite: MGMT 605 or MGMT 600

    MGMT 625 COLLABORATION, NEGOTIATION AND CONFLICT MANAGEMENT (3)

    Addresses negotiation skills and the capacity to effectively resolve conflicts. Students apply theory and research to the practice of negotiation and conflict management through practical, hands-on experience including simple buyer-seller bargaining; labor-management negotiations; impasse resolution; and complex, multiparty, multiissue negotiations. prerequisite: MGMT 605 or MGMT 600

    MGMT 650 RESEARCH FOR STRATEGIC HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT DECISIONS (3)

    Covers methods and tools used in business research. Topics include locating sources of strategic human resource management information, developing a research project, using the computer to process data and organizing and presenting strategic human resource management reports. prerequisite: OPRE 504 or OPRE 505 and OPRE 506 or equivalent

    MGMT 710 HUMAN RESOURCE AND COMPENSATION MANAGEMENT (3)

    Covers human resource management issues including legal considerations, recruiting, selection, performance appraisal, development and health and safety. Also covers strategic compensation issues, including job evaluation, benefits administration and pay determination strategies. Additional emphasis on workforce diversity, international dimensions and ethical consideration. Prerequisite: MGMT 600 or MGMT 605

    MGMT 712 EMPLOYMENT LAW AND THE HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGER (3)

    Covers employment law as it applies to management decisions in recruitment and promotion as well as in terms of management’s responsibility to comply with federal laws. Topics include legal issues in employment law and the legal consequences of noncompliance, the regulatory model of government control over the employment relationship, equal employment opportunity, safety and health regulations, the Americans with Disabilities Act, pay and benefits law, the Employee Retirement Income Security Act, civil rights of employees (privacy and wrongful discharge), the Family Leave Act, international comparisons and emerging regulatory issues. prerequisite: MGMT 600 or MGMT 605

    MGMT 725 LABOR RELATIONS AND CONFLICT MANAGEMENT (3)

    Focuses on the legal foundations of labor-management relations and the collective bargaining process. Also covers the basic principles of contract negotiation, administration, impasse resolution, comparative labor relations in cross-cultural contexts, and conflict management strategies applied to workplace settings for groups and individuals. prerequisite: MGMT 600 or MGMT 605

    MGMT 730 LEADERSHIP, LEARNING AND CHANGE (3)

    Based on the idea that the deeper we go into the exploration of organizational leadership, learning and change, the more we need to deal with the dimensions of the sense-making, connection-building, choice-making, vision-inspiring, reality-creating roles of leaders. The course involves a series of workshops designed to help students learn something that cannot be taught: leading, learning and changing “from within.” Readings, assignments and Web forum interactions are designed to inspire “practices of deep inflection”: storytelling, historical inquiry, reflective reading and writing, dialogue and action research.

    MGMT 731 LEADERSHIP SEMINAR (3)

    Focuses on the critical issues pertaining to success in operating at the executive level in business and other organizations. Topics include vision, values clarification, knowing the customer, communications for internal motivation and public awareness, ethical responsibilities, decision-making, resource decisions, performance maximization, human asset activities and individual leader behaviors for effectiveness. Prerequisite: Graduate Standing

    MGMT 732 LEADERSHIP: SELF-ORGANIZATION IN THE FIRM (3)

    Covers self-organizing systems, complexity theory in management, dialogue as a management tool, leadership in a complex system, pursuing a personal discovery process and growing new knowledge and innovation. A major objective is to discover the management principles and processes that promote and foster self-organization as an alternative to command-and-control hierarchies. Also draws on the profound implications of self-organization for growing new knowledge and innovation. A second major objective has to do with the process of personal discovery. Parallel principles of spontaneous order operate at the level of the organization and at the level of the individual. As a result, a highly leveraged form of change in an organization is leadership through personal growth and discovery.

    MGMT 741 SPORT IN THE GLOBAL MARKETPLACE (3)

    Offers an interdisciplinary examination of the global flows of sporting capital. It challenges students to consider the social, cultural, technological and economic structures that constitute and are constituted by the expanding international sports industry. Using theories from a number of disciplines, students consider issues related to sport commerce in the global marketplace, including market saturation, just-in-time manufacturing of sporting goods, global sport branding, labor conditions in developing nations, sport in core and periphery economies, international sport regulation, post-industrial sporting economies, sport in the global popular, sport labor migration, sport and the culturalization of economics, global Fordism and the challenges facing the global business of sport. prerequisite: completion of all 500-level fundamental courses

    MGMT 742 SOCIAL AND ETHICAL ISSUES IN SPORT (3)

    An exploration of the incontrovertible link among sport, commerce and culture. Understanding sport forms as cultural and intertwined with business is accomplished through the sociological and philosophical analysis of several sport-related topics. Topics include sport as a mediated spectacle; factors such as race, gender and class; the negotiation of sporting spaces; and human rights. Knowledge of these social and ethical issues is discussed in terms of its practical application to the sport industry setting. prerequisite: completion of all 500-level fundamental courses

    MGMT 745 MANAGING THE SUSTAINABLE ENTERPRISE (3)

    Sustainability is a modem business concept that focuses on development of win-win-win business strategies that respect people, profit and the planet (the “triple bottom line”). This course incorporates the history of capital, business and environmentalism and the triple-bottom-line concept. It enables managers to incorporate sustainability into every phase of the business process and develop appreciation for the competitive implications of a sustainable business strategy.

    MGMT 757 E-COMMERCE AND SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT (3)

    Provides an overview of e-commerce and supply chain management. Covers in detail the role of e-commerce in the design, integration and management of supply chains; topics include logistics networks, business-to-business and business-to-consumer supply chains, decision-support systems for supply chain management, strategic alliances, Internet strategy, e-business models, e-markets (including auctions and exchanges), Internet retailing, dynamic pricing, distribution networks, Internet-based integration of value chains, the role of the Internet infrastructure (banks, utilities and so forth), decision technologies, information goods, the status of brands in the Internet economy, mass customization and various technologies related to e-business. Also covers sustainability; topics include environment and operations management, the design of sustainable products and closed-loop supply chains.

    MGMT 760 ORGANIZATIONAL CREATIVITY AND INNOVATION (3)

    Focuses on strategy and techniques for successfully leading intrapreneurship and innovation in organizations. Covers the role of power, influence and communication in the change process; confrontation and effective intervention; creativity; and acceptance of innovation. Included are individual and group concepts and techniques of organizational development; frameworks for research and experiential exercises. prerequisite: MGMT 600 or MGMT 605

    MGMT 765 MANAGEMENT OF HEALTH CARE ORGANIZATIONS AND PROFESSIONALS (3)

    A two-module course focused on major organization and management issues in health-care service organizations and on the roles and interactions of individual health professionals and their relationships with patients and with the organization’s administration. prerequisite: MGMT 600 or MGMT 605

    MGMT 770 PLANNING, PREVENTION AND RISK MANAGEMENT (3)

    Identifies and defines critical infrastructures and their associated threats and countermeasures. Software applications containing risk-management tools are mastered and provide skills necessary for the comparison and selection of competing proposals designed to optimize infrastructure protection. Industry-specific studies are performed using these risk-management analysis techniques. Contingency and continuity of operation planning (COOP) techniques are also reviewed. Skills acquired during the course are applied to case studies of selected industrial, service and government organizations to practice critical infrastructure planning, protection and risk management. prerequisites: OPRE 505, OPRE 506 and INSS 605

    MGMT 780 LEADING ACROSS CULTURES (3)

    Focuses on leadership challenges and dilemmas of multinational and multicultural organizations within the United States and among other countries. Enhances knowledge and capabilities to more effectively identify, understand and manage the cultural components of organizational and business dynamics. Topics include cultural value awareness, cross-cultural communication skills and cross-cultural leadership skills, including strategic planning, organizational design and creating and motivating a globally competent workforce. Prerequisite: MGMT 600 or MGMT 605.

    MGMT 781 INTERNAT'L BUSINESS STRATEGY (3)

    Draws on the framework of global strategic management to help students integrate the concepts of economics, finance, marketing, technology and operations in a global context. Focuses on market entry issues, transnational structures, operational issues and leadership in cross-cultural settings and provides the framework for a real-world, international business project that may be completed by student teams and which offers the option for a study/analysis trip to another country. prerequisite: all 500-level M.B.A. courses or equivalent

    MGMT 790 STRATEGIC MANAGMENT CAPSTONE (3)

    An experiential capstone in which students assume the perspective of general managers facing decisions of strategic importance to their organizations. Emphasizes the critical functions of goal-setting, strategy formulation, implementation and control processes. prerequisites: ACCT 605, ECON 605, ENTR 605, FIN 605, INSS 605, MGMT 605, MKTG 605, OPRE 605

    MGMT 792 Special Topics in Management (1.50)

    An intensive exploration of topics in the area of management. Topics include e-commerce, e-commerce and supply chain management, e-venturing, leadership, organizational theory and best business practice. Refer to semester class schedule for title of topic offered. May be repeated for credit when the topic varies. prerequisite: to be determined by the instructor

    MGMT 795 ENTREPRENEURSHIP PRACTICUM (3)

    Students are provided the opportunity to work with a new company or product/service division on a real-life entrepreneurship project. Students work together in consulting teams composed of teammates with varying specializations and interests. Projects may deal with market analyses, feasibility studies, distribution analyses or a variety of other specific company needs. prerequisite: department consent

    MGMT 796 GLOBAL BUSINESS PRACTICUM (3)

    Provides students with opportunities for real-world experience working with companies on international projects of real value and priority to the companies. Students choose an international study experience from the participating Merrick School of Business specializations and companies. Student consulting teams work together on a specific corporate project, focusing on a particular country or region of interest to the company. Projects may focus on market analyses, feasibility studies, distribution analyses or a variety of other specific company needs. Students register for this course as a 3-credit elective. prerequisite: department consent

    MGMT 797 SPECIAL TOPICS IN MANAGEMENT (3)

    An intensive exploration of topics in the area of management. Topics include e-commerce, e-commerce and supply chain management, e-venturing, leadership, organizational theory and best business practice. Refer to semester class schedule for title of topic offered. May be repeated for credit when the topic varies. prerequisite: to be determined by the instructor

    MGMT 798 GLOBAL FIELD STUDY (3)

    There is no better way to understand and succeed in global business today than through direct experience, or immersing oneself in a foreign environment. This course will provide an opportunity for lectures and discussion with local experts and students regarding key themes of economic, political and cultural importance to business. The course will also engage students in field visits to companies, government agencies and other organizations located abroad. prerequisite: department consent

    MGMT 799 INDIVIDUAL RESEARCH (1 - 3)

    Investigation into a particular subject in more depth than can be accommodated by an existing course. Students work closely with an individual faculty member. prerequisites: approval of management instructor, department chair and academic adviser

  • MKTG: Marketing

    MKTG 505 MARKETING ESSENTIALS (1.50)

    Covers concepts, processes and institutions necessary for effective marketing of goods and services, including analyses of market opportunities, buyer behavior, product planning, pricing, promotion and distribution. prerequisite: graduate standing

    MKTG 605 MARKETING STRATEGY (1.50)

    Explores the role of marketing in creating value for the firm and its stakeholders and examines market strategy in the context of a dynamic external environment. prerequisite: MKTG 504 or MKTG 505 or permission of the M.B.A. program director

    MKTG 615 ENTREPRENEURIAL MARKETING (1.50)

    Emphasizes market opportunity analysis, product development, creation and formulations of strategic positioning, pricing feasibility, channel strategies and promotion with limited resources in entrepreneurial and intrapreneurial settings. prerequisite: MKTG 605

    MKTG 625 CUSTOMERS AND MARKETS (1.50)

    Focuses on choosing customers and markets through data analysis, building customer loyalty and communicating to current and potential customers in B2C, B2B and nonprofit organizations. prerequisite: MKTG 605

    MKTG 742 SOCIAL, NONPROFIT AND PUBLIC SECTOR MARKETING (3)

    Centers on the application of social marketing principles, frameworks and tools within nonprofit and public-sector organizations to improve performance and foster the successful dissemination of social initiatives to individuals, foundations and corporations. Recognizing that this sector represents many differences in missions, structures and resources, this course emphasizes that effective social marketing requires a change from being organization-centered to becoming audience-centered. prerequisite: MKTG 605

    MKTG 745 STRATEGIC SPORT MARKETING (3)

    Compares and contrasts the field of sport marketing with the practices and applications of mainstream marketing. Includes an overview of the foundations of sport marketing and examines the application of these principles to collegiate and professional sport organizations, special events, facilities, commercial and public organizations, sponsors and corporations, sporting goods manufacturers and the sport enterprise in general. Combines lecture, assigned readings, case studies, research assignments and special projects to strategically assess the current state of sport marketing. prerequisite: MKTG 605 or MKTG 640

    MKTG 755 INTEGRATED MARKETING COMMUNICATIONS (3)

    Analyzes integrated marketing communications (IMC) management and the role it plays in organizations’ marketing plans. Focuses on strategic, synergistic planning to effectively use promotional tools to help the firm achieve their promotion objectives. These tools include advertising, direct marketing, online marketing, sales promotion, personal selling, public relations, buzz marketing, trade shows, etc. Regulation, ethics, social responsibility and economic factors that affect an IMC program will also be examined, as will consideration of the international environment, special decision areas and how the IMC mix may change as a firm goes global. prerequisite: MKTG 605 or MKTG 640

    MKTG 760 GLOBAL MARKETING MANAGEMENT (3)

    The theory and application of marketing in a global context. Topics include international trade and financial markets; market structures of nations; and consumption behavior related to culture, social values and economic conditions. Also considers the political and legal control over marketing activities (advertising, promotion and distribution), the growth of regional marketing arrangements relative to competitive strategies of multinational corporations, the dilemma of marketing ethics in a multicultural world and the cost-benefit of technology transfer. prerequisite: MKTG 605 or MKTG 640

    MKTG 762 MARKET OPPORTUNITY ANALYSIS (3)

    Introduces the subject of opportunity analysis in marketing, intrapreneurship and entrepreneurship as well as the practice of their requisite skills. Includes the analysis of markets, competition, preliminary cost feasibility and intellectual property and also involves the creation and development of strategic positioning appropriate to the marketing opportunity. prerequisite: MKTG 605 or permission of the instructor.

    MKTG 770 PRODUCT AND BRAND DEVELOPMENT AND MANAGEMENT (3)

    Focuses on the firm’s product and brand development and management strategies with a special emphasis on innovative offerings. The influence of the social, legal and technological environment, as well as relationships with users and channel members, on the implementation of product and brand strategies are analyzed and discussed in depth. Encourages the application of the learned concepts to tangible and intangible products such as goods, services and ideas. prerequisite: MKTG 605 or MKTG 640

    MKTG 780 MARKET INFORMATION AND RESEARCH (3)

    Focuses on the acquisition, evaluation and use of competitor and consumer information for goods and services. Explores a variety of methods, including the use of electronic data such as the Internet, computer databases and scanner data as well as behavioral research (e.g., focus groups, observations, survey research and experiments). Emphasis on the timeliness and validity of information in making effective marketplace decisions regarding competitor and consumer behavior. prerequisite: MKTG 605 or MKTG 640

    MKTG 792 Special Topics: (1.50)

    Explores specialized topics in marketing, allowing flexibility for both the changing developments in applied business practice and the educational needs of students. Exact topical coverage and prerequisites are listed in the schedule of classes. prerequisite: MKTG 605 or MKTG 640

    MKTG 796 MARKETING PRACTICUM (3)

    Student teams apply concepts from other courses and from their experience to solve marketing problems. They are provided the opportunity to work with an organization or with a product/service division of same on a real-life marketing project. Students work together in consulting teams composed of teammates with varying interests, backgrounds and academic specializations. Projects may deal with a variety of marketing strategies, including customer and competitive analysis, feasibility studies, product and service development, promotion, pricing, distribution, analyses and a variety of other specific organization or company needs. prerequisite: department consent

    MKTG 797 SPECIAL TOPICS: (3)

    Explores specialized topics in marketing, allowing flexibility for both the changing developments in applied business practice and the educational needs of students. Exact topical coverage and prerequisites are listed in the schedule of classes. prerequisite: MKTG 605 or MKTG 640

    MKTG 799 INDEPENDENT STUDY (1 - 3)

    Prerequisites: Approval of marketing instructor, department chair and academic adviser. MKTG 605

  • CNCM: Negotiations/Conflict Mgmt

    CNCM 504 THE CONFLICT MANAGEMENT PROFESSION (3)

    Explores the diverse activities, roles and tasks of those who work in the conflict management profession. Introduces reflective practice to assist individuals, families, neighborhoods, organizations, regulatory bodies, and social and ethnic groups to take constructive steps toward managing, resolving or transforming conflict situations. Students start understanding and exploring where and how they would like to connect with conflict management as a profession.

    CNCM 506 UNDERSTANDING AND ASSESSING CONFLICT (3)

    Introduces theories of conflict and different perspectives used to understand and assess conflict. Various views of conflict, conflict escalation and resolution are studied, utilizing insights from a range of disciplines including psychology, sociology, communications, cultural studies and law.

    CNCM 508 APPROACHES TO MANAGING CONFLICT/METHODS OF DISPUTE RESOLUTION (3)

    Introduces various approaches to managing conflict and explores the differences among approaches based on domination, compromise and integration. Covers various methods of dispute resolution, including litigation, negotiation, mediation and arbitration.

    CNCM 510 RESEARCH METHODS (3)

    Introduces various methods of research in the social sciences, law and the humanities that students will encounter in the field of conflict studies. Also enables students to utilize a variety of systems of citation and reference.

    CNCM 513 NEGOTIATIONS:THEORY AND PRACTICE (3)

    Introduces the theory and practice of negotiations and explores various models of negotiation and bargaining, highlighting similarities and differences in the models and methods of negotiation. Covers various stages of negotiation, from pre-negotiation to negotiation proper to post-settlement negotiation, and emphasizes the development of skills through the use of role plays to enable the student to apply theory to cases.

    CNCM 515 MEDIATION:THEORY AND PRACTICE (3)

    Introduces the theory and practice of mediation and explores various models of the mediation process as well as diverging views concerning the role of the mediator. Key issues include neutrality and bias on the part of the mediator, confidentiality, codes of ethics for mediators and the current status of legislation concerning the qualifications and licensing of mediators. Students develop and practice mediation skills by acting as mediators in various scenarios that illustrate the process of mediation.

    CNCM 519 ADVANCED MEDIATION SKILLS (3)

    Provides students with the opportunity to develop the advanced skills necessary to function as a mediator in the context of a particular model of mediation. prerequisite: CNCM 515 highly recommended

    CNCM 620 SPECIAL TOPICS: (3)

    Explores topics in the field of negotiations and conflict management. Topics vary according to student interest and faculty member specialization. Course may be repeated for credit when topic differs. prerequisites (if any): to be determined by instructor

    CNCM 710 TERRORISM & COUNTERTERRORISM (3)

    Provides an introduction to current scholarship on terrorism and counterterrorism. Students explore cutting-edge debates that highlight the need for sophisticated conflict analysis in the post-Sept. 11 world. Readings, research, reports, films, discussion and debate, case studies, simulations and other class exercises are used to help students better understand the concept and origins of terrorism, explore similarities and differences in the way terrorists and counterterrorists organize and strategize, approach the problem of securing support, address conflict and, in some cases, resolve their conflicts. prerequisite:none

    CNCM 730 ORGANIZATIONAL CONFLICT AND CONFLICT MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS (3)

    Examines the nature of conflict as it occurs in organizations, how conflict can function both destructively and constructively in that context, and the history of how conflict has traditionally been viewed and managed in organizational contexts. Also considers the theory underlying the creation of integrated conflict management systems in organizations, the nature of such systems and how they are developed, designed and evaluated.

    CNCM 740 ETHNIC & CULTURAL FACTORS OF CONFLICT (3)

    Explores the roles played by ethnicity, race, religion and culture in the generation, resolution and conduct of conflicts within and between groups. Examines physical and symbolic markers of difference to understand both why groups differentiate themselves from one another and how mechanisms such as skin color, religious affiliation, ethnic background or cultural traditions can provide the grist for conflict or the grease that promotes resolution. Primary analysis is based on the examination of cases relevant to the different issues underlying these conflicts. prerequisite: CNCM 506 or permission of instructor

    CNCM 790 INTERNSHIP (3)

    Gives students a clinical, hands-on experience to support both their classroom learning and their career goals. Provides the opportunity to use and further develop applied conflict management skills, apply theory and research skills to the practice environment and network with conflict management professionals. Eligible for continuing studies (CS) grade; otherwise grading is pass/fail. prerequisite: completion of a minimum of 30 credits required for degree program

    CNCM 798 CAPSTONE COURSE (3)

    A reflective paper designed to integrate theory and practice and to equip the student with a well-thought-out approach to future involvement and professional practice in the field. Eligible for continuing studies (CS) grade; otherwise grading is pass/fail.

  • OPM: Operations Management

    OPM 505 INTRODUCTION TO OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT (1.50)

    Overview of the concepts and tools used for the creation and delivery of goods and services. Describes the role of effective operations management for organizational success and competitiveness. Demonstrates approaches for improving quality, productivity, customer service and overall performance. prerequisite: graduate standing

    OPM 615 INNOVATION AND PROJECT MANAGEMENT (3)

    Covers the essentials of innovation and project management from project selection through implementation, monitoring, control and termination. Topics covered include: product/process innovation, project identification, risk and uncertainty in project management, project planning and budgeting, selecting the project team, resource allocation, implementation and control, and project evaluation and termination. prerequisite: OPM 505 or MGMT 506

    OPM 625 OPERATIONS AND SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT (3)

    Provides in-depth coverage of the concepts, techniques and tools used to design, create, control and improve manufacturing and services operations. Topics covered include: operations strategy, quality management, high- and low-contact services, forecasting, smart pricing, procurement, global supply chains, sustainability in manufacturing and services, aggregate sales and operations planning, inventory control and operations scheduling. prerequisite: OPM 505 or MGMT 506

    OPM 792 Special Topics in Operations Management (1.50)

    An extensive exploration of topics in the area of Operations Management. Refer to class schedule and syllabus for title and further description

    OPM 797 Special Topics in Operations Management (3)

    An extensive exploration of topics in the area of Operations Management. Refer to class schedule and syllabus for title and further description

  • OPRE: Operations Research

    OPRE 505 FUNDAMENTALS OF STATISTICS (1.50)

    Emphasizes applications of descriptive statistics in business. Topics include basic probability concepts, summary measures of location and dispersion, discrete and continuous probability distributions, sampling distribution of mean, and introductions to confidence interval estimation and hypothesis testing. Excel-based software is used for computer implementation. prerequisite: graduate standing

    OPRE 506 MANAGERIAL STATISTICS (1.50)

    Emphasizes applications of inferential statistics in business. Topics include confidence interval estimation, hypothesis testing, analysis of variance, simple linear regression and an introduction to multiple regression. Excel-based software is used for computer implementation. prerequisite: OPRE 505

    OPRE 605 BUSINESS ANALYTICS (1.50)

    Explores business analytics and its applications to management decision-making for a range of business situations. Covers problem structuring; big data; data mining; optimization; computer simulation; decision analysis; and predictive modeling. prerequisite: OPRE 504 or OPRE 505 and OPRE 506 or equivalent or permission of the M.B.A. program director.

    OPRE 792 SPECIAL TOPICS IN OPERATIONS RESEARCH (1.50)

    Explores advanced topics in operations research of interest to faculty and students. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisites and topics are selected and printed in the schedule of classes. prerequisite: department consent

    OPRE 797 SPECIAL TOPICS IN OPERATIONS RESEARCH (3)

    Explores advanced topics in operations research of interest to faculty and students. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisites and topics are selected and printed in the schedule of classes. prerequisite: department consent

    OPRE 799 INDIVIDUAL RESEARCH: OPERATIONS RESEARCH (1 - 6)

    Individual research in an area of interest to the student. The expectation is that work equivalent to a regular graduate course will be completed. Formal paper(s) will be written under the supervision of a full-time faculty member. prerequisites: approval of information systems instructor, department chair and academic adviser

  • PUAD: Public Administration

    PUAD 619 PUBLIC MANAGEMENT (3)

    Provides an in-depth study of public organizations and management by integrating organizational theory and public management practice to address problems and issues that managers confront in public organizations. Prerequisites: None

    PUAD 620 PUBLIC POLICY (3)

    Designed to increase understanding of the public policy process. Policy frameworks and models are used to examine policy interventions in the United States. Examines the stages of policy as well as the methods that public administrators use to assess feasibility and implementation of various policies. Prerequisite; PUAD 623- Foundations: Bureaucracy and the Political Process.

    PUAD 621 HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT IN PUBLIC AND NONPROFIT ORGANIZATIONS (3)

    A study in public and nonprofit human resource management policies, practices, laws and regulations. Topics include recruitment and selection, training and development, motivation, compensation, performance appraisal, discipline, and labor relations.

    PUAD 622 PUBLIC BUDGETING AND FISCAL ADMINISTRATION (3)

    Role, dynamics, politics and processes involved in the budgetary function and associated budget preparation methods, and fiscal interrelationships of federal, state and local levels of government.

    PUAD 623 FOUNDATIONS: BUREAUCRACY AND THE POLITICAL PROCESS (3)

    Introduces students to the field of public administration theory and practice and examines the intellectual foundations, democratic context, and practical implications of contemporary public administration. Addresses organizational, functional and administrative aspects of the federal bureaucracy, as well as the interrelationships among federal, state and local agencies, and public administration as a part of the political process. Prerequisite: Students will be required to enroll in the course during their first 15 credit hours.

    PUAD 624 PUBLIC ORGANIZATION THEORY (3)

    Development and evolution of public organizational structures. A study of the postulated models and hypotheses of future needs for government organization.

    PUAD 625 INNOVATIONS IN PUBLIC MANAGEMENT (3)

    Designed to integrate the perspectives of public administration by focusing on the management problems in public agencies. Includes use of emerging techniques in management to address the problems and issues faced by public managers under the changed environment of the public sector.

    PUAD 626 INFORMATION RESOURCES MANAGEMENT (3)

    Role of computers in developing and managing information necessary for decision-making in public organizations. Includes consideration of computer applications, including the development and management of databases and the use of software applications for decision-making in both individual and distributed computing contexts. Also considers implications of computer technology, such as privacy, control and security. Working knowledge of spreadsheets and database software is required. prerequisite: computer competency

    PUAD 627 LEGAL AND ETHICAL ENVIRONMENT OF PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION (3)

    Legal and ethical dimensions of the democratic policy process as it has evolved in the United States. Attention to the manner in which historical as well as contemporary socio-political patterns of governance have shaped the notions of law and ethics that are to provide public administrators with the benchmarks of democratic accountability, responsibility and responsiveness.

    PUAD 628 STATISTICAL APPLICATIONS IN PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION (3)

    Quantitative analysis for public administrators. Topics include statistical analysis, the computer in processing data and the presentation of findings. Students must complete PUAD 628 within the first 15 credit hours.

    PUAD 629 PUBLIC PROGRAM EVALUATION (3)

    Systematic application of quantitative and qualitative research methods to the assessment of public policy interventions. Covers topics within formative and summative evaluation contexts, including needs assessments, impact evaluation and process evaluation. prerequisite: PUAD 628

    PUAD 630 ANALYTICAL TECHNIQUES IN PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION (3)

    Review of analytical techniques conventionally used in the planning, formulation and implementation of public policy. Topics include forecasting techniques, cost-benefit analysis, PERT and other commonly used techniques. prerequisite: PUAD 628

    PUAD 700 CONCEPTS AND PRACTICES OF NONPROFITS (3)

    Nonprofit organizations serve as the foundation for the third sector of the economy. This course explores the history, foundations and types of nonprofit organizations as well as the diverse political, social and economic contexts within which they exist. Prerequisite: None

    PUAD 701 PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION AND PUBLIC FINANCE (3)

    Analysis of revenue forecasting, revenue strategy, impact of inflation, taxation, “back-door” spending, pension funding, user fees and other aspects of governmental finance. Emphasis on the special characteristics of public finance in communities operating with fragmented and multilayered governmental structures.

    PUAD 702 PUBLIC FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT (3)

    Topics include municipal expenditure patterns and revenue sources, taxation at the local level, fiscal and economic aspects of federalism and federal-state-local fiscal coordination, and the role of budget in the determination of policy, in administrative integration and in influencing government operations. Emphasis on the foregoing as they pertain to the Baltimore metropolitan area.

    PUAD 703 URBAN MANAGEMENT (3)

    Topics include municipal, governmental and administrative structures and their inter-relationship in a regional context, the interfacing and management of public services, examination of governmental programs in municipal areas, municipal administrative problems and the attendant role of the public administrator. Emphasis on the foregoing as they pertain to the Baltimore metropolitan area.

    PUAD 704 MANAGING DIVERSITY (3)

    Examines issues of diversity in the workplace, particularly in relation to organizational performance and service delivery among public organizations. Uses historical and legal frameworks to consider the struggles of marginalized groups and employs theoretical and applied perspectives to examine the barriers, challenges and benefits of diversity in the workplace.

    PUAD 705 SPECIAL TOPICS IN PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION (3)

    Coverage of selected topics of current interest to students or of interest to a special segment of students. prerequisite: permission of monitoring faculty member or program director

    PUAD 709 INDIVIDUAL RESEARCH (1 - 3)

    Individual research on an academically sound project of interest to the student in consultation with a monitoring faculty member. Depending on the scope and depth of research, from 1 to 3 credits may be earned for the successful completion of this course. Eligible for continuing studies grade. Prerequisite: approval of M.P.A. program director and monitoring faculty member. Students may only enroll in PUAD 709 once for a total of three credits.

    PUAD 720 URBAN POLITICS AND POLICY PLANNNING (3)

    Study of political institutions in urban areas and the policy responses, processes and problems with reference to such issues as land use, community growth and development, environment, local and state services and regional and national urban policies, with particular focus on the Baltimore Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area.

    PUAD 725 FUNDAMENTALS OF GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SCIENCE AND SYSTEMS (3)

    Provides students with foundational knowledge in both geographic information science and Systems that will allow them to better understand and think critically about the role of "place and space" and to engage in the routine use of basic GIS technology in their studies and workplace. Students will learn to use ESRI's ArcGIS to create maps and analyze geo-data and relationships, and to present their results to others. prerequisites: none

    PUAD 730 STATE & LOCAL PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (3)

    Development and application of personnel systems and procedures in state and local jurisdictions, and how state and local politics and federal laws and regulations impact them.

    PUAD 731 PUBLIC EMPLOYEE UNION LABOR RELATIONS & COLLECTIVE BARGAINING (3)

    Study of the background, extent and nature of the unionization of government employees. Coverage of current regulations involving collective bargaining, adjudication of labor grievances and bargaining tactics.

    PUAD 732 LEADERSHIP AND ORGANIZATIONAL CHANGE (3)

    Nature of technological and environmental change as it affects the management decisions of the agency. Techniques for organizational change, including diversified but integrative decision-making structures and techniques, implementation techniques, enforcement techniques and evaluation tools. The impact of a changing environment on the leadership skills needed in a modern environment.

    PUAD 733 MANAGING PUBLIC SECTOR PROJECTS (3)

    Introduction to the theories and techniques of project management. Covers some standard project analytic techniques (e.g., PERT charts and project management software) but emphasizes recognition of barriers to effective project team functioning and project completion. Students understand and design plans for effective project management and identify and respond to problems in team dynamics and to external problems requiring adaptation.

    PUAD 734 STRATEGIC PLANNING (3)

    Covers the steps involved in developing a strategic plan for public and nonprofit organizations. Students learn how to perform a stakeholder analysis, conduct a situation analysis, develop appropriate mission statements, design effective performance measures and implement a strategic plan.

    PUAD 740 ADMININISTRATIVE LAW AND REGULATION (3)

    Role of administrative law and regulation in the governmental process. An examination of the function of the public administrator in implementing legislation through the formulation of administrative law and regulation, and the rules, procedures and techniques for their formulation.

    PUAD 760 REGULATORY POLICY AND ADMINISTRATION (3)

    Political, legal and economic dimensions of regulation. Includes a delineation of the conceptual framework for government intervention into the marketplace and a determination of the effects of this intervention. Topics include the rise of government regulations, structure and procedures of regulatory agencies, the politics of regulation and the future of regulation.

    PUAD 761 ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY AND ADMINISTRATION (3)

    Overview of environmental law, institutions and regulation and the factors that have shaped environmental policy at the federal, state and local levels. Assesses the impact of environmental policy at these levels and the impact of environmental legislation on the behavior of administrators responsible for its implementation and administration. Examines the major policy processes in controlling pollution standard-setting and compliance.

    PUAD 763 PUBLIC POLICYMAKING (3)

    Overview of the process of public policymaking, including the formulation of public issues, the consideration of issues and the adaptation of solutions to public problems. Emphasis on actors in the policy process and the environment within which they function.

    PUAD 764 PUBLIC POLICY IMPLEMENTATION (3)

    Review of the diverse conceptualization frameworks of analyzing the implementation of public programs. Emphasis is on the analysis and integration of the subsequent political, economic, social, cultural and managerial factors that impact the implementation of public policies.

    PUAD 770 GOVERNMENT-BUSINESS COOPERATION IN COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT (3)

    Review of the relations of institutions in the private and public relations of private-sector decisions to public-sector decisions and the impact of public-sector decisions on private-sector institutions. Introduces research topics related to government and business cooperation in community development. Provides a forum for the exchange of ideas between spokespersons of public- and private-sector institutions. Students write and present analytical research papers on pertinent topics.

    PUAD 775 INTERGOVERNMENTAL ADMINISTRATION (3)

    Evaluation, growth, present status and characteristics of the U.S. federal system of government. Topics include federal-state relations, state-local relations, regionalism, councils of government, interstate cooperation, grants-in-aid and revenue sharing.

    PUAD 776 LEGAL ASPECTS OF NONPROFIT ADMINISTRATION (3)

    Surveys the legal structure that defines and regulates the nonprofit sector and examines the fundamental governance issues in nonprofit corporations. Emphasizes the board of directors (trustees) and the executive director, and their collective fiduciary responsibilities established both by law and by the moral imperative derived from acting in the public interest. Prerequisites: none

    PUAD 777 POLITICAL ECONOMY OF NONPROFIT ORGANIZATIONS (3)

    Study of the role of nonprofit activity in the development and administration of public policy. Topics include the political economy of nonprofit organizations and the nonprofit sector. Nonprofit management and the relationships among government, business and nonprofit activity are examined within the current context of issues and future trends.

    PUAD 781 INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY: PUBLIC SECTOR APPLICATIONS (3)

    Design and implementation of public-sector IS and IT projects, including current developments and issues in the application of available technology to public-sector management. The role of technology in enhancing intergovernmental coordination, improving service, increasing efficiency and reducing government spending. Technologies examined include distributed transaction-oriented databases; data warehousing, management information systems and executive- and group-decision support systems; geographic information systems; office automation, voice response systems and document imaging; electronic data interchange and kiosks; and electronic commerce over public networks.

    PUAD 785 PUBLIC SECTOR PERFORMANCE MEASUREMENT (3)

    Structuring data collection and analysis techniques to determine precisely what an agency is attempting to do and what it accomplishes through its outputs. Emphasis is on shaping the outputs to have a measurable positive impact on customers and other stakeholders.

    PUAD 790 INTERNSHIP (3)

    Designed to broaden the educational experience of students through work assignments with appropriate governmental agencies. Eligible for continuing studies grade. Required of all pre-service students. prerequisite: approval of program director and monitoring faculty member

    PUAD 797 NONPROFIT MANAGEMENT: APPLIED SKILLS SEMINAR (3)

    Exploration of topics in nonprofit management of mutual interest to faculty and students, such as program evaluation, risk management, communications and board management. Content varies according to demand. Specific topic is listed in the schedule of classes. May be repeated for credit as topics change.

    PUAD 798 PROBLEM SOLVING SEMINAR IN PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION (3)

    Capstone course requires students to integrate and apply analytical skills, knowledge bases, managerial principles and normative frameworks learned in M.P.A. core courses to concrete management situations. Student must earn a B grade or better to graduate. prerequisites: completion of PUAD 621, PUAD 622, PUAD 623, PUAD 624, PUAD 625, PUAD 627, PUAD 628, PUAD 629 and PUAD 630 with grades of B- or better prior to enrolling in course (students may be concurrently enrolled in PUAD 626) or permission of Master of Public Administration program director

  • PBDS: Publications Design

    PBDS 501 INTRODUCTION TO WEB DEVELOPMENT (3)

    Introduction to the fundamentals of front-end Web design. Students learn how to write basic HTML and CSS. Emphasis on preparing media for Web use, HTML tags, CSS attribute and how the two languages work together to create functional and visual front-end Web design. Grading: pass/fail; credits do not count toward a UB graduate degree or certificate. Lab fee required.

    PBDS 502 INTRODUCTION TO GRAPHIC DESIGN PRINCIPLES (3)

    Hands-on course for students with a limited background in graphic design. Emphasis on basic strategies for visual problem-solving and techniques for preparing comprehensive layouts. Pass/fail grading. Lab fee required.

    PBDS 503 WORKSHOP IN WRITTEN COMMUNICATION (3)

    Practicum in the skills of writing and research. Instruction focuses on projects in the student’s subject field. Emphasis on revising, proofreading, editing, adapting and translating for different media and audiences. Recommended for students in all graduate programs who wish additional work in writing, with permission of the graduate program director. Grading: credit/no credit or letter grade.

    PBDS 505 SHORT COURSE IN WRITING (1)

    Intensive course meeting three hours per week for five weeks and focusing on a specialized aspect of professional writing. Content varies according to the concurrent interests of faculty and students. May be repeated for credit when the topic changes. Grading: credit/no credit or letter grade. Lab fee may be required.

    PBDS 506 SHORT COURSE IN WRITING (1)

    Intensive course meeting three hours per week for five weeks and focusing on a specialized aspect of professional writing. Content varies according to the concurrent interests of faculty and students. May be repeated for credit when the topic changes. Grading: credit/no credit or letter grade. Lab fee may be required

    PBDS 508 SHORT COURSE IN GRAPHICS (1)

    Intensive course meeting three hours per week for five weeks and focusing on a specialized aspect of graphic design or graphic production. Content varies according to the concurrent interests of faculty and students. May be repeated for credit when the topic changes.

    PBDS 509 SHORT COURSE IN GRAPHICS (1 - 3)

    Intensive course meeting three hours per week for five weeks and focusing on a specialized aspect of graphic design or graphic production. Content varies according to the concurrent interests of faculty and students. May be repeated for credit when the topic changes.

    PBDS 600 MEDIA DESIGN (3)

    Examination of light, space, motion and sound—their manipulation and use in designing intentional communications and their interrelationships with words and graphics. Also examines the production process, from needs assessment and proposal writing to storyboards and finished program. Lab fee may be required.

    PBDS 601 WORDS AND IMAGES: CREATIVE INTEGRATION (6)

    Building on a foundation of rhetorical theory, students explore imaginative ways of communicating with audiences, both visually and verbally. Experimenting with brainstorming strategies prepares them to draw on their own creative resources as they develop original solutions to challenging communication problems. Publications Design students must earn a B (3.0) or better in this course. Lab fee required. prerequisite: PBDS 615

    PBDS 602 INTRODUCTION TO DIGITAL VIDEO (3)

    Introductory course in video and audio production. Students learn to shoot, light, edit, and record sound in a digital environment. They also gain experience in producing for videotape, CD-ROM, DVD and the Web. Lab fee required.

    PBDS 603 EDITORIAL STYLE (3)

    Editorial style as a total concept, including the historical context of the written word, styles and methods of editing, and special skills such as proofreading, line-by-line editing, reorganizing, rewriting, working with writers and artists and editing as management. Each student becomes the editor of his/her own special project. Lab fee may be required.

    PBDS 604 WRITING FOR THE MARKETPLACE (3)

    Writing for various freelance markets, including features and reviews, poetry, fiction, public relations and advertising. Analysis of the audiences to which various publications appeal and development of a proposed publication aimed at a specific audience. Each student conducts a thorough investigation of a self-selected market and prepares what is intended to be a publishable manuscript for that readership.

    PBDS 605 PUBLIC AND PRIVATE LANGUAGES (3)

    Examination of the “private” or specialized languages of various professions (e.g., science, medicine, education, government and politics) and the means by which these languages may be translated for the public. Each student investigates, through intensive reading, study and imitation, at least one specialized language and attempts to become proficient in adapting and/or decoding that language for public consumption.

    PBDS 610 VISUAL & VERBAL RHETORIC (3)

    Analysis and evaluation of visual and verbal texts composed in a variety of media—both traditional and electronic—in light of classical and contemporary theories of communication. Completion of a major project based on substantial primary and secondary research and tailored for a specific audience.

    PBDS 611 THE CRAFT OF POPULARIZATION (3)

    Writing for a lay audience about subjects that are technically or scientifically challenging or normally fall within the province of the scholar and specialist or otherwise inhibit instant understanding. Emphasis on clarity, precision and grace of expression.

    PBDS 612 CREATIVE METHODOLOGIES (3)

    Provides an overview of key concepts in creative design methodologies and explores these concepts during the design process for critique and reflection. Following a learning-by-doing model of instruction this course is grounded in both theory and practice. Both attuned to a human-centered approach that is design driven, user oriented and process based.

    PBDS 613 DESIGN WRITING (3)

    Introduces students to the practices and processes of various design-focused writing genres (criticism, features, online posts, personal and academic essays) as they examine the issues and policies that shape the designed environment. Employing various writing genres, students explore the designed environment with special emphasis on its contexts and consequences.

    PBDS 615 TYPOGRAPHY I (3)

    Exploration of the fundamentals of typographic form and function, progressing through the history, physical characteristics and implementation of type. Projects include the application of basic principles to an increasingly complex set of typographic problems. Knowledge of Adobe InDesign is required for this class, which must be taken within the first 9 credits of study. Lab fee required.

    PBDS 622 DESIGN FOR DIGITAL ENVIRONMENT (3)

    A digital interface design course focusing on design principles, elements, and typography applied to interactive sites and other dynamic media. This course will explore visually striking identity development and content styles. Students will design mock-ups using creative software implementing designs across digital environments. Emphasis is on creative conceptualization, branding across media, designing with Web standards, implementing information architecture and user experiences successfully, and effective visual communications. Pre-requisites: PBDS 601 Words & Images: Creative Integration, PBDS 615 Typography I, and PBDS 660 Digital Development, or permission of instructor. Lab Fee required

    PBDS 638 DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY (3)

    Explores the endless possibilities of digital imaging. Beginning with acquisition, students learn about composition, lighting, depth of field and the substantive differences between digital and more traditional methods of photography. Students follow their images through the digital darkroom stage, exploring a variety of digital manipulation techniques to produce material for print and Web distribution. Emphasis on the development of portfolio-quality pieces. Lab fee required.

    PBDS 639 VIDEO AESTHETICS & TECHNIQUE (3)

    In-depth analysis of the aesthetic variables affecting video programs. Advanced video and audio projects culminating in a thesis-quality production. Lab fee required. prerequisite: PBDS 602

    PBDS 640 DESIGN PRINCIPLES AND STRATEGIES (3)

    Exploration through hands-on design projects of the roles of typography, photography and illustration in graphic communication. Analysis of audience, context, goals, market, competition and technical constraints. Brainstorming and problem-solving in groups and individually. Projects are suitable for inclusion in the student’s portfolio. Lab fee required. prerequisites: PBDS 615 and PBDS 601

    PBDS 641 MAGAZINE DESIGN (3)

    Intensive focus on the creative writer’s forum—the literary magazine—or on consumer and trade publications. Purpose, philosophy, cover and content design, typography, production and other aspects of small press and consumer publications are covered. A final project, chosen by the individual student, is completed during the semester. Lab fee required. prerequisites: PBDS 615 and PBDS 612

    PBDS 642 BOOK DESIGN (3)

    Exploration of books and book jackets as objects to be planned and produced, with emphasis on appropriate design choices and creative solutions. Lab fee required. prerequisites: PBDS 615 and PBDS 612

    PBDS 645 TYPOGRAPHY II (3)

    An advanced exploration of typographic form and function, beginning with the physical characters of letterforms and progressing to the application of typographic principles to more complex problems such as information hierarchies, narrative sequencing, message and creative expression. The course will expand the class scope of Typography I. Projects in this course will be suitable for portfolio use. Lab fee required. prerequisites: PBDS 615 and PBDS 612

    PBDS 647 INFORMATION DESIGN (3)

    The first priority of designers and writers is presenting information clearly. Students explore how typography, color, symbols, language and imagery can be strategically used to communicate complex information, underscore a message or tell a story more effectively. Students plan, write and design projects suitable for inclusion in their portfolios, all with the aim of elaborating their ability to organize information and solve problems. Lab fee required. prerequisites: PBDS 615 and PBDS 612

    PBDS 649 DESIGNER'S SURVIVAL GUIDE (3)

    Students develop design strategies that consider their clients’ needs and constraints, utilize professional design software to execute comprehensive layouts capable of being printed on a conventional printing press, communicate with print vendors using standard printing terminology and troubleshoot basic prepress issues. Lab fee required. prerequisites: PBDS 612 and 615

    PBDS 650 ADVANCED GRAPHIC DESIGN (3)

    Through a series of progressively more sophisticated assignments, students develop design solutions that resolve a range of problems normally faced by clients. Projects include institutional and corporate brochures, identity programs, posters and a variety of other communications materials. Lab fee required. prerequisites: PBDS 615 and PBDS 612

    PBDS 660 WEB DEVELOPMENT (3)

    Introduction to current standards and best practices for Web design. Emphasis on frameworks, content management systems and tools available for building and maintaining dynamic Web sites. Students must pass the pretest or pass PBDS 501 before registering for this course. lab fee required.

    PBDS 661 ADVANCED WEB DEVELOPMENT (3)

    Continues and builds upon the fundamental concepts and skills developed in PBDS 660 Web Development. Students learn the skills needed to apply complex specifications for digital media. Emphasis on advanced Web design using CSS, current scripts and plug-ins, content management systems and Web analytics to create more complex sites for diverse digital environments. lab fee required. prerequisites: PBDS 612, PBDS 615 and PBDS 660, or permission of the instructor

    PBDS 662 DESIGN FOR DIGITAL ENVIRONMENTS (3)

    A digital interface design course focusing on design principles, elements and typography applied to interactive sites and other dynamic media. Students explore visually striking identity development and content styles, design mock-ups using creative software and implement designs across digital environments. Emphasis is on creatively conceptualizing, branding across media, designing with Web standards, implementing information architecture and user experiences successfully, and creating effective visual communications. Lab fee required. prerequisites: PBDS 612, PBDS 615

    PBDS 670 MOTION GRAPHICS FOR INTERACTIVE MEDIA (3)

    Students explore the relationship between graphic design and time-based interactive media while examining the history and fundamentals of animation. Students use current industry software to produce a range of motion graphics projects for the Web and other interfaces. Special attention is given to the creative processes and developing an appropriate conceptual, technical and aesthetic critical sense within the language of motion design for dynamic media. Lab fee required. prerequisites: PBDS 615, PBDS 612, Adobe CS4 competency and one of the following: PBDS 645, DESN 616 or permission of program director

    PBDS 671 MOTION GRAPHICS I (3)

    After examining ways that motion graphics—logos, titles, etc.—differ from static graphics, and after learning various tools and animation techniques, students conceptualize, storyboard and produce motion graphics for video and other screen-based delivery systems. Lab fee required. prerequisites: PBDS 601, PBDS 602, PBDS 615 and PBDS 645

    PBDS 672 MOTION GRAPHICS II (3)

    Continues and builds upon the fundamental concepts and skills developed in PBDS 671 Motion Graphics I. Students learn the skills needed to apply complex animation techniques and narratives to notion graphic projects. Emphasis on advanced motion graphics that employ 3D workflows to create more complex screen-based projects for diverse environments. Lab fee required. Prerequisites: PBDS 612, PBDS 615 and PBDS 671, or permission of the instructor.

    PBDS 680 ADVANCED PR STRATEGIES (3)

    Overview of how to create and implement appropriate communications and marketing plans for both for-profit and nonprofit organizations. Emphasis is on research techniques, concept development and copywriting for all environments: online, print, video and animation. Other areas covered include writing proposals, making oral presentations and working with designers, artists and clients. Lab fee may be required.

    PBDS 691 ART OF THE INTERVIEW (3)

    A face-to-face interview is essential for journalists and authors of books and articles dealing with current affairs and real-life issues, documentary filmmakers and even for public relations writers. In all these fields, you often need to gather information directly from people—orally. This course addresses how to research an interview, the ethics of an interview and how to distill information from an interview and write it up in a coherent, compelling fashion.

    PBDS 692 WRITING FOR DIGITAL ENVIRONMENT (3)

    Writing for all contemporary digital forms, including websites, landing pages, e-mail, social media, blogs and more. Students also explore how content and technology interact. Students complete a series of professional-level assignments using the forms individually and in combination. Understanding the roles of research, search engine optimization, information design and strategic thinking in writing for the Web is also emphasized.

    PBDS 693 MAGAZINE WRITING (3)

    Understanding, conceiving, writing and selling various types of magazine articles, including some of the following: trend stories, service stories, profiles, Talk of the Town, short features, personal essays. Readings include essays about the craft of journalism and books of narrative nonfiction. Prerequisite: None.

    PBDS 704 COPYRIGHT AND PUBLISHING (3)

    Introduction to media law, particularly as it relates to the field of publications. Provides a broad historical and theoretical overview and requires students to apply legal theory through the use of case studies and examples drawn from the business of media. Explores the impact of technology on the evolution of media law and considers ethical issues currently faced by professionals in publications and communications.

    PBDS 705 DESIGN-BUSINESS LINK (3)

    Relying largely on case histories and class discussions, this course examines the role of design as a competitive business strategy, with an emphasis on the many ways that designers and business people can work together to provide the synergies that successful design can bring to any organization.

    PBDS 712 TOPICS IN ADVANCED INTERACTION DESIGN (3)

    Intensive exploration of topics in advanced interaction design of mutual interest to students and faculty. Content varies according to the concurrent interests of faculty and students. Course may be repeated for credit when topic changes. Lab fee required. prerequisite: PBDS 660 or passing score on the hypermedia proficiency exam and IDIA 612

    PBDS 712 HISTORY OF GRAPHIC DESIGN (3)

    History of graphic design in Europe and in America, centering on the modern period but also dealing with design influences from earlier periods and from other cultures. Provides a background of visual solutions on which students may draw to solve their own publications design problems.

    PBDS 719 DESIGN THINKING (3)

    Introduces design concepts to those with minimal or no background in design and builds an awareness of the importance and breadth of design throughout our culture. Focuses on developing creative-thinking skills and visual literacy. Areas of design covered include graphic, information, digital, environmental and industrial design. Also examines and discusses design ethics, design sustainability and the evolving role of design thinking in business. Lab fee required.

    PBDS 720 THE DIGITAL ECONOMY (3)

    Impact of the digital revolution in a number of areas—how we make a living, how we govern ourselves and how we create values for ourselves. Provides students with an understanding of the way the digital economy creates a unique business culture and establishes (and reflects) a network of new economic values. Prepares students to effectively invest their time, talent and imagination in the new culture and economy of digital technology.

    PBDS 731 SEMINAR IN CREATIVE WRITING AND PUBLISHING (6)

    The capstone course for the specialization in Creative Writing and Publishing. Entering the course with a completed or nearly completed manuscript written while in the program, students revise, design and produce a publication consisting of their own original work. Ina a seminar setting, they act as peer advisors to one another and are responsible for providing in-depth critiques of each other's work. Team taught by a creative writer and a book artist or graphic designer, the course revisits and re-examines concepts introduced in earlier courses. Lab fee required.

    PBDS 735 PORTFOLIO (3)

    Capstone experience during which each student prepares a professional portfolio that demonstrates mastery of the skills in writing and design emphasized throughout the program. In addition to refining work produced in earlier courses, each student produces a personal identity package and an electronic version of the portfolio. Lab fee required. prerequisites: PBDS 615 and PBDS 612

    PBDS 740 SEMINAR IN PUBLICATIONS DESIGN (3)

    Culminating course in the master’s program in publications design tests and stretches all knowledge and skills students have been learning up to this point. Students conceive a solution to a particular communications problem, work in teams to analyze its audience(s), develop a plan for making it public via print and/or other media, and design and write a prototype. Lab fee required. prerequisites: PBDS 615 and PBDS 601; course should be taken in a student’s final semester

    PBDS 750 WRITING: SPECIAL TOPICS (3)

    Intensive exploration of topics in writing of mutual interest to students and faculty. Content varies according to the concurrent interests of faculty and students. Specific topic is listed in the schedule of classes. Course may be repeated for credit when topic changes. Lab fee may be required.

    PBDS 751 GRAPHIC DESIGN: SPECIAL TOPICS (3)

    Intensive exploration of topics in graphic design of mutual interest to students and faculty. Content varies according to the concurrent interests of faculty and students. Specific topic is listed in the schedule of classes. Course may be repeated for credit when topic changes. Lab fee may be required. prerequisites: PBDS 615 and 601

    PBDS 753 MEDIA: SPECIAL TOPICS (3)

    Intensive exploration of topics in communication and media of mutual interest to students and faculty. Content varies according to specific interests and trends in communication. Specific topic is listed in the schedule of classes. Course may be repeated for credit when topic changes.

    PBDS 754 BUSINESS PRACTICES: SPECIAL TOPICS: (3)

    Intensive exploration of topics in the business of a publications enterprise that are of special interest to faculty and students. Possible topics include managing a publications department, design studio or magazine, market research, and marketing and legal issues in publications. Specific topic is listed in the schedule of classes. Course may be repeated for credit when topic changes. Lab fee may be required.

    PBDS 755 BACKGROUNDS AND IDEAS: SPECIAL TOPICS: (3)

    Intensive exploration of cultural trends, historical developments, ideas or systems of communication that have influenced or informed creative work in a variety of visual and verbal media. Content varies according to the concurrent interests of faculty and students. Topic appears under that name in the schedule of classes. Course may be repeated for credit when topic changes. Lab fee may be required.

    PBDS 756 HYPERMEDIA: SPECIAL TOPICS (3)

    Intensive exploration of topics in hypermedia of mutual interest to students and faculty. Course may be repeated for credit when topic changes. Lab fee may be required. prerequisites: PBDS 615 and 612

    PBDS 775 INTERNSHIP (3 - 6)

    Direct experience working with a publications staff. Internship opportunities include working with private advertising and public relations firms, nonprofit agencies at the federal and state levels or private business and professional agencies that maintain publications staffs. Eligible for continuing studies grade. Lab fee may be required. prerequisite: permission of program director

    PBDS 779 INDEPENDENT STUDY (1 - 3)

    Research or problem-solving project in some aspect of publications design. Topics and number of credits vary with individual student interests. Eligible for continuing studies grade. Lab fee may be required. prerequisite: permission of program director

    PBDS 789 CREATIVE THESIS (3)

    Independent project, closely supervised by a faculty adviser. The thesis consists of a substantial body of creative writing (a volume of poems, a collection of stories or other prose, a novel), as well as the design for the cover, title page and one inside spread. Finished work is reviewed by a faculty committee. Eligible for continuing studies (CS) grade; otherwise grading is pass/fail. Lab fee may be required. prerequisite: permission of program director

    PBDS 797 INTEGRATED DESIGN THESIS (3)

    Independent and original design project supervised by a faculty member. This work should reflect an understanding of graphic design principles and demonstrate excellence in conceptualizing and executing design solutions to communication problems. Finished work is reviewed by a faculty committee. Pass/fail grading. prerequisite: program director’s approval of topic prior to registration

    PBDS 798 CONTINUOUS ENROLLMENT (1)

    Provides continuing faculty direction, academic support services and enrollment services for students who have completed all course requirements for the degree but have not completed a thesis or final project. Students continue the independent work leading to finishing the thesis or final project that is significantly under way. Course may be repeated for credit as needed. Eligible for continuing studies (CS) grade; otherwise grading is pass/fail. Lab fee required. prerequisite: completion of all course requirements for degree program

    PBDS 854 ADVANCED WORKSHOP: PUBLISHING (3)

    Organized around publishing projects initiated by students in the doctoral program. Work is independently developed but critiqued by the class, the instructor and outside professionals. Course may be repeated for credit only with the approval of the instructor and the director of the doctoral program. Lab fee required.

  • TAXA: Taxation

    TAXA 650 TAX RESEARCH AND WRITING (3)

    Covers research and writing projects on federal tax subjects with analysis and instruction in tax research techniques, materials and methodology. Students are required to prepare legal memoranda.

    TAXA 651 FUNDAMENTALS OF FEDERAL INCOME TAX I (3)

    Covers basic concepts in federal income taxation, including gross income, exclusions, adjusted gross income, deductions, exemptions, credits, assignment of income, identification of the taxpayer, tax rates, depreciation and the alternative minimum tax.

    TAXA 652 CORPORATE TAXATION (3)

    Covers federal income taxation of corporations and their shareholders with emphasis on the formation of the corporation, capital structure, operational alternatives, distributions, partial and complete liquidations, personal holding companies and the accumulated earnings tax. Formation, operation and liquidation of S corporations discussed briefly.

    TAXA 653 PARTNERSHIP TAXATION (3)

    Explores problems encountered in the formation, operation and liquidation of a partnership, including the acquisition of partnership interests, compensation of the service partner, the treatment of partnership distributions and problems associated with the disposition of partnership interests or property by sale.

    TAXA 654 TAX PRACTICE & PROCEDURE (3)

    Covers aspects of practice before the Internal Revenue Service, including ruling requests, handling of audits, assessment of deficiencies and penalties, closing agreements, tax liens, statutes of limitations, claims for refunds, appeals conferences and practice before the U.S. Tax Court, U.S. District Courts, Claims Court and appellate courts. Also includes analysis of the problems encountered in parallel civil and criminal proceedings, problems involving government investigatory powers and taxpayer rights and privileges.

    TAXA 655 TAX POLICY (3)

    A study of the evolution and structure of the federal income tax system from a public-policy perspective with a focus on legal, economic, social and practical considerations. Alternatives, including current legislative proposals, are considered. Students prepare a paper on a tax policy issue approved by the professor.

    TAXA 660 ESTATE AND GIFT TAXATION (3)

    Covers the basic principles of federal estate and gift taxation, including computation of the taxable estate, inter vivos transfers, transfers in contemplation of death, transfers with retained interests or powers, joint interests, life insurance proceeds, property subject to powers of appointment, the marital deduction and the unified credit.

    TAXA 662 FOREIGN TAXATION (3)

    Analysis of the federal income tax provisions applying to U.S. inbound and outbound transactions and investments. Course covers U.S. resident status, source-of-income rules, graduated tax on effectively connected income, withholding tax on FDAP income, branch profits tax, FIRPTA, tax treaties, foreign tax credit, foreign earned income exclusion, Subpart F and transfer pricing.

    TAXA 663 QUALIFIED PENSION AND PROFIT-SHARING PLANS (3)

    An introduction to pension and profit-sharing law with particular emphasis on Title 2 (IRS) of ERISA. Geared toward understanding all of the pension and profit-sharing rules that must be met for plan qualification, with emphasis on qualified plan planning for both incorporated and unincorporated forms of business.

    TAXA 664 EXECUTIVE COMPENSATION (2)

    Covers methods of providing tax-free and tax-deferred compensation to employees, including section 83 tax planning, stock option tax planning, incentive compensation arrangements and methods of funding nonqualified plans.

    TAXA 665 TAX EXEMPT ORGANIZATIONS (2)

    An analysis of provisions relating to the qualification for exemption from federal income tax, with emphasis on section 501(c)(3) organizations, private foundations and the treatment of unrelated business income.

    TAXA 667 ESTATE PLANNING (972) (3)

    Examines methods of disposing of estates by will, life insurance, inter vivos arrangements and the consideration of resulting tax and administrative problems. Also focuses on gathering and analyzing facts in the planning and drafting of trusts, wills and related documents. additional prerequisite: TAXA 660

    TAXA 668 BUSINESS PLANNING WORKSHOP (3)

    An integrated study of the impact of tax, securities, corporate law and partnership law on business transactions. Topics include selection of the form of business enterprise, acquisitions and dispositions of business interests, and professional responsibility issues. Students prepare writing projects relating to the course material. additional prerequisites: TAXA 652 and TAXA 653

    TAXA 670 INCOME TAXATION OF ESTATES AND TRUSTS (3)

    Covers federal income taxation of decedents’ estates, simple and complex trusts, charitable trusts and grantor trusts. Also covers the preparation of fiduciary income tax returns with emphasis on unique tax issues such as income in respect of a decedent, distributable net income and fiduciary accounting.

    TAXA 671 CORPORATE REORGANIZATIONS (3)

    An analysis of the tax treatment of corporations and shareholders in corporate acquisitions, divisions, reincorporations and recapitalizations, including a discussion of section 338. Review of the net operating loss carryover and collapsible corporation rules. additional prerequisite: TAXA 652

    TAXA 672 STATE AND LOCAL TAXATION (3)

    Explores federal constitutional and statutory limitations on state authority to tax a multistate business. Specific topics include the Commerce Clause, sales and use tax nexus and PL 86-272 limitations on state income taxation. Also covers apportionment of income derived from a multistate business and combined versus separate entity reporting. Maryland state and local taxation also are examined briefly.

    TAXA 674 CONSOLIDATED CORPORATIONS (2)

    An analysis of the techniques used by multiple, related corporations to report income and losses. Detailed examination of the consolidated income tax regulations and consideration of other problems encountered by affiliated groups of corporations. additional prerequisite: TAXA 652

    TAXA 675 ADVANCED REAL ESTATE TAXATION (2)

    An analysis of the effect of income taxes on real estate transactions; a comparison of the various entities used for the ownership and development of real estate; real estate syndications, basis and basis adjustments; alternative financing techniques such as the sale-leaseback; depreciation, amortization and obsolescence; passive activity and at-risk rules; and REITS. additional prerequisite: TAXA 678

    TAXA 676 FEDERAL TAX LEGISLATION WORKSHOP (3)

    A workshop course that examines the process of formulating and enacting federal tax legislation, as well as areas ripe for current federal tax legislative proposals; these areas may include income tax rates, capital gains taxation, tax expenditures, and the federal estate tax. Students will engage in drafting and other exercises that simulate the process of creating such legislation from the standpoint of staffers on Congressional committees. Prerequisite: Fundamental Federal Income Tax I

    TAXA 678 FUNDAMENTALS OF FEDERAL INCOME TAX II (3)

    A continuation of basic tax concepts, including cash and accrual methods, capital gains and losses, 1231 transactions, recapture, original issue discount and imputed interest, below-market loans, installment sales, like-kind exchanges, involuntary conversions, at-risk rules and passive loss rules.

    TAXA 679 WELFARE BENEFIT PLANS (2)

    Welfare benefit plans are employee-sponsored plans that provide employees with benefits other than pension and retirement plans and deferred compensation. Welfare benefit plans include life insurance, health insurance, disability insurance, vacation pay, severance pay, educational reimbursement, group legal services and dependent assistance care plans. This course focuses on federal income tax requirements for various welfare benefit plans, including fringe benefits and health-care continuation coverage under COBRA. Examines the income tax consequences to employers who sponsor, and employees who participate in, welfare plan benefits. Discusses the various mechanisms for offering welfare benefit plans, such as cafeteria plans under section 125 and VEBAs under section 501(c)(9).

    TAXA 680 ADVANCED QUALIFIED PENSION AND PROFIT-SHARING PLANS (3)

    Building on the foundation provided by Qualified Pension and Profit-Sharing Plans, this in-depth examination of defined contribution and defined benefit plans includes current IRS positions; final, proposed and temporary regulations; and developing case law. Tax sheltered annuities are considered. additional prerequisite: TAXA 663

    TAXA 682 BANKRUPTCY TAXATION (2)

    An introduction to the basics of bankruptcy law and creditors’ rights and an analysis of tax issues that arise.

    TAXA 684 S-CORPORATIONS (1)

    Covers federal income taxation of S corporations and their shareholders with emphasis on the creation of the S corporation, capital structure, operational alternatives, distributions and liquidations.

    TAXA 689 ADVANCED PARTNERSHIP TAXATION (3)

    This course builds upon the ideas presented in Partnership Taxation and provides students with additional skills that are valuable when practicing in the area of partnership taxation. Requires an ability and willingness to engage in critical thinking and problem-solving. Topics covered include the issues surrounding family limited partnerships; transferring property into and out of a partnership on a tax-deferred basis; recognizing transactions considered tax shelters or “abuses of subchapter K” under the current climate; and the international tax concepts. additional prerequisite: TAXA 653

    TAXA 690 STATE TAX POLICY ISSUES SEMINAR (2)

    This advanced state and local tax seminar consists of discussions of articles written by leading state tax theoreticians and practitioners regarding the present condition and likely future of state taxation in the 21th century. Each student will be expected to moderate at least one group discussion during the semester. The grade will be based on class participation and the completion of one publishable paper on a state tax policy topic of the student's choice, subject to the instructor's approval.

    TAXA 692 INTRODUCTION TO THE TAXATION OF FINANCIAL PRODUCTS (2)

    Study of the taxation of basic financial building blocks (equity, debt, options, notional principal contracts and forward contracts) and their various combinations. Financial equivalencies among traditional and derivative instruments that are taxed under widely varying tax regimes. Use of financial instruments to change the timing, character and source of income. Gaps in existing law, possible future tax regimes and emerging financial products.

    TAXA 799 INDEPENDENT STUDY (1 - 2)

    Students may study an area of particular interest to them, not covered in a significant way elsewhere in the program, via an independent study. To qualify, students must submit a written proposal and obtain the consent of a faculty member who supervises the project. The proposal must be approved by both the supervising faculty member and the program director.